Population health studies

The Australian Government funds the following studies, surveys, reporting and analysis to inform policy and planning, help people manage their health and prevent chronic disease.

Intergenerational Health and Mental Health Study (IHMHS)

The IHMHS run by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) will collect data on about 60,000 Australians starting from 2021. The data will focus on:

  • mental health
  • general health
  • risk factors
  • nutrition
  • physical activity
  • biomedical health status.

More information is available at Intergenerational Health and Mental Health Study.

Australian Health Biobank

The Australian Health Biobank is being set up to provide a national collection of biological samples from the Australian population. This will provide a unique resource for researchers in the future to undertake a wide range of research projects to improve the health and wellbeing of Australians.

The Australian Health Biobank is being funded by the Australian Department of Health which has contracted the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) to act as the Australian Health Biobank Custodian.

At this stage, participation in the Australian Health Biobank is only available for Australians who have been randomly selected to take part in the National Health Measures Survey (NHMS), conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

More information is available on the CSIRO website.

Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health

The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, run by the University of Newcastle and the University of Queensland, is a long-term population-based study. The study looks at the physical and mental health of about 57,000 Australian women. It began in 1995 and follows 4 cohorts of women, born in 1921-26, 1946-51 and 1973-78 and 1989-95.

More information is available on the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health website.

Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health

The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health (Ten to Men), run by the Australian Institute of Family Studies, collects data on the health of Australian males and the factors that affect their quality of life across 3 age groups. It examines the social, economic, environmental and behavioural factors of about 16,000 Australian males aged 10–14 years; 15–17 years and 18–55 years at baseline.

More information is available on the Ten to Men website.

Australian Burden of Disease Study

The Australian Burden of Disease Study, run by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW), estimates the years of healthy life lost in Australia from living with, or dying early from, 219 diseases and injuries. The study examines the negative impact of 40 risk factors (such as tobacco use, alcohol use and obesity) and expenditure for the included diseases and injuries.

The latest reports and interactive data are available on the AIHW website.

National Health Survey

The National Health Survey, run by the ABS, collects data on the health of Australians including health conditions, health risk factors and demographic and socio-economic information. It is part of a series of national health surveys by the ABS since 1977.

More information is available on the ABS website.

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey

The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey, run by the ABS, collects information from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people on health measures. These measures include general health and wellbeing, health risk factors and health service usage.

More information is available on the ABS website.

Australian Health Survey

The Australian Health Survey, run by the ABS, collected data on Australians from 2011 to 2013. The data focused on:

  • health status
  • risk factors
  • socioeconomic circumstances
  • health related actions
  • nutrition and physical activity
  • biomedical information.

More information and reports are available on the ABS website.

Public Health Information Development Unit (PHIDU)

The PHIDU provides interactive social health atlases that present Australian public health data by geographic level in maps, graphs and data tables. The atlases can display location-specific data on hundreds of indicators, for example disease prevalence, disability, health risk factors, and health service use. The information includes differences by age, sex and socio-demographic measures.

More information and access to the atlases is available on the PHIDU website.

AIHW National Centre for Monitoring Chronic Conditions

The AIHW National Centre for Monitoring Chronic Conditions provides analysis and reporting on chronic conditions, comorbidity and risk factors. This includes monitoring for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, chronic respiratory conditions and chronic musculoskeletal conditions.

The centre uses a range of data sources including ABS surveys, administrative datasets and population health studies.

Published reports by topic are available on the AIHW website.

National injury surveillance and reporting

National injury surveillance and reporting is undertaken by the AIHW in collaboration with the National Injury Surveillance Unit at Flinders University. It provides data on the nature, extent and consequences of injury in Australia to support injury prevention and safety promotion policies and programs.

More information and reports are available on the AIHW website.

Australian Immunisation Register – Multi-Agency Data Integration Project (AIR-MADIP)

The Australian Bureau of Statistics’ (ABS) Multi-Agency Data Integration Project (MADIP) links the Australian Immunisation Register (AIR) with other Australian Government datasets. This allows more complex immunisation analysis and reporting by population characteristics to inform policy decision-making and evaluation.

Analysis is underway on a range of topics including factors impacting uptake of COVID-19 vaccines in Australia. We are analysing preliminary COVID-19 vaccine coverage estimates for some vulnerable and priority population groups, such as people from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

More information is available at Australian Immunisation Register linked to the Multi-Agency Data Integration Project.

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