Basic daily fee supplements for aged care

The Australian Government is committed to improving food and nutrition in aged care and is providing additional funding to all residential aged care services to deliver better care to residents.

As of 1 October 2022 the 2021 BDF supplement has been rolled into the AN-ACC funding for residential aged care services, ensuring it has an enduring impact in improving food and nutrition standards.

MPS and NATSIFACP services will continue to receive the BDF as a discrete payment from 1 October 2022.

Food and nutrition reporting has been strengthened and is now mandatory for all residential aged care services (including MPS and NATSIFAC) reflecting the Government’s commitment to improved accountability in aged care.

Food and Nutrition reporting is completed through the Quarterly Financial Report (QFR), and is now mandatory for all residential aged care providers.

Reporting for Quarter 2 is due on 15 February 2023. The reporting form will be available from 1 January 2023on the Department’s Forms Administration website. All reports must be submitted via the QFR.

Completion of this report is mandatory for all services, including MPS and NATSIFACP services.

Background

The 2021 Basic Daily Fee (BDF) supplement supported aged care providers to deliver better care and services to residents, with a focus on food and nutrition. 

From 1 July 2021 eligible residential aged care providers who entered into an agreement with the Department (known as an undertaking) were receiving an additional $10 per day, per resident.

The 2021 BDF supplement was available to eligible:

  • residential and respite aged care services
  • flexible care services that are Multi-Purpose Services (MPS)
  • services providing residential care under the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Aged Care Program (NATSIFACP).

As of 1 October 2022 the 2021 BDF supplement has been rolled into the AN-ACC funding for residential aged care services, ensuring it has an enduring impact in improving food and nutrition standards.

MPS and NATSIFACP services will continue to receive the BDF as a discrete payment from 1 October 2022.

Reporting requirements

Food and Nutrition reporting is now completed through the Quarterly Financial Report (QFR). The reporting form is available on the Department’s Forms Administration website. All reports must be submitted via the QFR.

The QFR must be submitted four times throughout the financial year. Submission dates are legislated and for the 2022-23 financial year are as follows:

Reporting periods and deadlines

Quarter Reporting period Reporting deadline

Quarter 2

1 October – 31 December 2022

14 February 2023

Quarter 3

1 January – 31 March 2023

5 May 2023

Quarter 4

1 April – 30 June 2023

4 August 2023

If you have queries regarding the Food and Nutrition reporting requirements, please email: nutritioninagedcare@health.gov.au.

How to submit a report

The Food and Nutrition reporting forms a portion of the overall QFR. This will be accessible to providers to complete from the first day of the following quarter, on the Department’s form administration site.

What to report on

The report will include information about resident expenses relating to food and nutrition:

  • Allied Health costs and hours
  • Food preparation model and catering type
  • Food catering costs
  • Food preparation hours

Data analysis – 12 months of food and nutrition reporting

In 2021-22, providers received $699.7 million under the BDF supplement to improve Food and Nutrition services in Residential Aged Care.

We analysed food and nutrition reports from over 2,700 residential services. Based on the past 12 months of self-reported data, our results show that:

  • An average of $14.46 was spent on food per resident per day in 2021-22, calculated from all services who reported.
    • For services reporting expenditure on food and ingredients only, the average was $12.54 per resident per day in 2021-22.
  • 75% of services, with expenditure on food and ingredients only, spent more than $10 per day in the six months to June 2022 (up from 67% in previous six months).
  • The average spend per resident per day increased quarter on quarter for all catering types, with quarter 3 showing a substantial increase of over 8% for services reporting expenditure on contract catering.
  • Food expenditure models did not change much across the year, with the proportion of services reporting expenditure on food and ingredients only, and the proportion of services reporting expenditure on contract catering remaining consistent.

The reporting also highlighted the commitment that services have shown to improve food, nutrition and the dining experience. These included:

  • inclusion of cultural or religious values
  • further specific education and training
  • development of a tool to measure food wastage
  • implementation of ‘Food Focus Communities’.

The full report includes key next steps on how we utilise the data to help inform policy options. These can further improve food and nutrition outcomes for older Australians.

This is the second and final report in the series under the Basic Daily Fee reporting model.

Read the first Food and Nutrition Report.

Food and Nutrition Report 2021–2022

The Food and Nutrition Report 2021–2022 details reporting outcomes and trend analysis from the 2021 Basic Daily Fee (BDF) Supplement in Residential Aged Care. This report is the second and final report of the series using the BDF and captures reporting outcomes across the full 2021–22 financial year

How else is the Australian Government improving food, nutrition and the dining experience?

The Australian Government is implementing a multi-faceted response to improving the quality of life for older Australians by driving better practices in residential aged care through a range of food and nutrition related initiatives.

  • Strengthening the capability of aged care cooks and chefs by working with the Maggie Beer Foundation to undertake sector education and training on how to source, prepare and serve more nutritious and appetising food, including training on texture modification and diversity in aged care.
  • New quality indicators for residential aged care which requires residential aged care services to report against critical care areas which food and nutrition can directly impact. These include unplanned weight loss, consecutive unplanned weight loss, falls and major injury and pressure injury through the National Aged Care Mandatory Quality Indicator Program (QI Program).
  • An urgent review of the Aged Care Quality Standards with a focus on key areas including food and nutrition, including the introduction of a dedicated food standard. This review provides an opportunity to enhance the measurability and detail expected of residential aged care services including in the delivery of food and nutrition and the dining experience to better reflect the expectations of older Australians.
  • Asking older Australians in residential aged care if they like the food and publishing this on My Aged Care through the Star Ratings using the results from consumer experience interviews (CEIs). The experiences of older Australians residing in aged care give vital insight into the quality of services they receive. The voice of older Australians is being returned to the centre of aged care services by reinstating CEIs. CEIs will be undertaken by a third party workforce independent of regulatory processes and published through the Star Ratings for residential aged care on the My Aged Care website by December 2022, enabling consumers, and their families, to make more informed and confident decisions about aged care services.

2012 basic daily fee supplement

The previous basic daily fee supplement (now called the 2012 basic daily fee supplement) helps residents who did not get any financial support to meet the 2012 fee increase. There is no change to the 2012 basic daily fee supplement, you do not need to apply for this supplement. Services Australia automatically pays this supplement for eligible care recipients.

View the 2012 basic daily fee supplement rate in the Schedule of Subsidies and Supplements.  

Resident eligibility

Your residents are eligible for the 2012 basic daily fee supplement if, on 1 July 2012, they did not have: 

  • an age pension
  • a service pension
  • a seniors supplement
  • a seniors health card.

You must have: 

  • received a subsidy for the resident under Chapter 3 of the Aged Care Act 1997 between 1 July 2012 and 30 June 2014 
  • received a subsidy for the resident under Chapter 3 of the Aged Care (Transitional Provisions) Act 1997 since 1 July 2014.

Full eligibility criteria is in Section 39 of the Aged Care (Transitional Provisions) Principles 2014. 

For these residents, you cannot charge more than 84% of the single basic age pension. The fee amount changes with the pension amount every March and September. 

The 2012 basic daily fee supplement is not available for respite care. 

Contact

Aged care subsidies and supplements contact

Email us (subsidiesandsupplements@health.gov.au) if you have questions about aged care subsidies or supplements for approved providers.
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