Coronavirus (COVID-19) current situation and case numbers

This page provides updates about the current situation, latest case numbers and related information. It is updated every day by 9 pm AEST and reflects the previous 24 hours.

We are managing the COVID-19 outbreak in Australia as a health emergency.  This page provides a number of visual representations of information about COVID-19 in Australia.

COVID-19 summary statistics

The below tiles show the:

  • number of locally acquired, overseas acquired and under investigation cases in the last 24 hours
  • current number of active cases, hospitalised cases and tests conducted in the last 24 hours. Note: the number of active cases is an estimate as states and territories differ in how they collect this data
  • total number of cases, deaths and tests.

Note: States and territories provide these figures daily. Due to the dynamic nature of case data, state and territory health departments may revise their daily numbers, where historic cases may be added or previously reported cases excluded after further investigation.

Daily data on the status of Australia's COVID-19 vaccine rollout is now available. This includes a detailed infographic and breakdown of vaccine doses administered across Australia. See the latest data on Australia's vaccine rollout.

Dr Lucas de Toca
8:09
Read transcript

Hello. I am Lucas de Toca from the Department of Health in Canberra. Welcome to top three. Today I want to provide an update and answer the questions you might have about the changes to the ATAGI advice on the use of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine. As usual, I’m joined by Linda who will be doing Auslan interpreting.

First question, what is the new ATAGI advice?

So the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation, or ATAGI, which is the group of experts that provides advice to governments about immunisation programs including the COVID-19 vaccine program, have updated their advice and they now recommend that Pfizer is the preferred vaccine for everyone aged under 60 years. People 60 years and over can continue to receive the AstraZeneca vaccine but they have now made clear that the preferred vaccine for people under 60 is Pfizer, raising that from the original advice of Pfizer being used in people under 50. Why has this advice changed? Well the ATAGI group as well as the TGA, the Therapeutic Goods Administration, continuously review the evidence, both internationally and domestically, about the vaccine, their effectiveness and their safety. ATAGI has been meeting weekly to review any new cases of adverse events associated with the use of the vaccines, including their newly identified thrombosis thrombocytopenia syndrome, or TTS, which is a very rare but serious blood clotting condition that has been associated with the AstraZeneca vaccine in infrequent cases. Their weekly reviews that ATAGI do allows all the experts to get the latest information on what's happening in Australia and overseas. And what they have observed is that the rate, so the incidence, the amount of people who get TTS in 50 to 59 year olds, is higher though than it was originally observed and it's higher than what was observed in international data. This might be partly to the fact that Australia is becoming really good at identifying this condition and identifying it early, but based on that and our epidemiological situation, the context of Covid in Australia, ATAGI has recommended that for people 50 to 59 years of age, the risk benefit analysis for the use of the AstraZeneca vaccine with this very rare side effect versus using a different one, just doesn't add up, and as part of that they've updated their advice to recommend that that group, so anyone under 60, get preferentially the Pfizer vaccine. This does not change the advice for people 60 years and over. This also does not change the advice about who's eligible for the vaccine. The same people who were eligible yesterday are eligible now but it's just different, that people 50 to 59 will now be recommended to get the Pfizer vaccine as opposed to the AstraZeneca vaccine.

Second question, what if I’ve already had a dose of AstraZeneca?

If you have already had one dose of AstraZeneca and you did not experience severe side effects or any contraindication, there is no reason that you cannot receive a second dose, regardless of your age. The ATAGI advice has not changed that full completion of an immunisation course requires two doses of the same vaccine, whether it's AstraZeneca or Pfizer, which are the two that are authorised in Australia. So if you had your first AZ dose, you don't have a contraindication and you didn't experience a severe side effect, regardless of your age, we strongly encourage you to get your second dose when it's due, because only then you can achieve the full protection that the vaccines grant, which is very good for both vaccines. This advice is for people who have not received a first dose and if they're under 60 then they are recommended to get the Pfizer vaccine instead. But if you had your first doze of AZ and you're due for your second please do not put it back if you didn't have a severe side effect associated with the vaccine, like the immense majority of people who got it, please get your second dose.

And finally, I’m in the 50 to 59 age group, how do I access a Pfizer vaccine?

Yeah so like with any changes in the program, things might take a little bit to adjust to the new advice. One thing that the Australian government is doing is ensuring that everyone in Australia has access to the most up-to-date information in the most transparent way possible, and that's why the advice from ATAGI was made public as soon as it landed. That means that sometimes the program might take a little bit, a few days, to catch up to the new and updated advice. From tomorrow, all 21 Commonwealth vaccination clinics that are already providing access to Pfizer, will be able to take or we will be accepting people in the 50 to 59 year old group and we will be making changes to the Eligibility Checker on health.gov.au in the coming days to reflect that updated eligibility. We will also continue to work with the states and territories to understand what the changes to the eligibility are in the coming days to ensure that people 50 to 59 years of age, newly eligible for Pfizer, have access to that vaccine. We're also working to transition the GPs that are currently providing access to the vaccine through offering the AstraZeneca vaccine, to also be able to offer Pfizer. That will be a gradual process by which all the over 4000 participating GPs get the option to also offer the Pfizer vaccine in the coming months, but we will start with 1300 of those in July. So from the 5th of July, we will see over three weeks, more and more GPs having access to deliver the Pfizer vaccine to anyone who is eligible, until we reach 1300 by the third week of July and then the rest of the GPs will be transitioning all the way through to October to expand that eligibility of Pfizer across the country. Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services are also starting to transition to be able to also offer the Pfizer vaccine on top of the AstraZeneca vaccine to the appropriate age cohort, and with a few already having that capacity and we're expecting that the rest will be able to make the transition over July and early August. So if you're 50 to 59 check the Eligibility Checker in the next few days, see where Pfizer is available for you to access and if you don't see a clinic or there's no appointments near you, just check in a few days, as more and more appointments will become available as more clinics are able to offer Pfizer to the newly eligible Pfizer cohort following the updated ATAGI advice. That's all for our questions today. We understand that there will be a lot more questions on this, every time there's a change we get a lot of questions and it's really important that we keep engaging in that manner. Thank you for continuing to tune in, thank you for staying CovidSafe, as we know really important in New South Wales, in Victoria, in Queensland, but everywhere in Australia as community transmission might be happening without us knowing, and if you're offered a vaccine and you're eligible and in the age group within the recommendations, they're voluntary but please consider having one because it's the best way to protect yourself, your loved ones and the broader community. Thank you very much. Thank you Linda and stay CovidSafe.

We are no longer displaying the ‘at a glance’ infographic on this page. Instead, you can view the daily infographics on the collection page.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) at a glance infographic collection

A collection of daily infographics providing a quick view of the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation in Australia each day since 5 April 2020.

Recently reported cases by state and territory and source of infection

Local, overseas acquired and under investigation cases by states and territories

This table shows the number of cases by source of infection in the last 24 hours and last 7 days as well as the number of active cases that have occurred in Australia.

Expand description of Local, overseas acquired and under investigation cases by states and territories

State and territory totals reflect where a person has been tested and public health management occurred, which may differ from their normal place of residence.

The majority of total confirmed cases and deaths are from Victoria.

The number of confirmed cases and deaths reported in each state and territory since the first case was reported in late January 2020. State and territory totals reflect where a person has been tested and public health management occurred, which may differ from their normal place of residence.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 confirmed case is a person who:

  • tests positive to a validated specific SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test or
  • has the virus isolated in cell culture, with PCR confirmation using a validated method or
  • undergoes a seroconversion to or has a significant rise in SARS-CoV-2 neutralising or IgG antibody level (e.g. four-fold or greater rise in titre).

Probable and historical cases are currently included in the total number of cases reported by some jurisdictions, these are defined as per the COVID-19 national guidelines.

Probable and historical cases are currently included in the total number of cases reported by some jurisdictions, these are defined as per the COVID-19 national guidelines.

The method used to estimate the number of active cases varies by jurisdiction.

Find out more about the current situation in your state or territory:

Daily reported cases

Daily and cumulative number of reported COVID-19 cases in Australia

This graph shows the total number of new COVID-19 cases in Australia reported each day by states and territories and the cumulative number of confirmed COVID-19 cases reported over time. These figures are collated and updated by 9 pm AEST each day and reflect the previous 24 hours.

Expand description of Daily and cumulative number of reported COVID-19 cases in Australia

This bar chart shows the newly confirmed COVID-19 cases by notification received date.

The line graph shows the cumulative number of newly confirmed COVID-19 cases by notification received date.

The horizontal axis shows the date of notification to state and territory health departments.

The vertical axis on the left shows the number of new COVID-19 cases, represented by the bars.

The vertical axis on the right shows the cumulative number of COVID-19 cases, represented by the line.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 confirmed case is a person who:

  • tests positive to a validated specific SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test or
  • has the virus isolated in cell culture, with PCR confirmation using a validated method or
  • undergoes a seroconversion to or has a significant rise in SARS-CoV-2 neutralising or IgG antibody level (e.g. four-fold or greater rise in titre).

The first cases of COVID-19 in Australia were identified in late January 2020. Following a peak of cases at the end of March, low numbers of cases were reported each day until early-June 2020. From mid-June 2020, cases increased and peaked in early August 2020 and then declined. Since late-September 2020, a low number of new cases continue to be reported each day. 

Total COVID-19 cases in Australia by source of infection

Total COVID-19 cases in Australia by source of infection

This table shows the number of COVID-19 cases by source of infection for each state and territory, since the first case was reported. The table also shows the total number of cases and deaths by state and territory.

Expand description of Total COVID-19 cases in Australia by source of infection

This table shows the number of COVID-19 cases by source of infection for each state and territory, since the first case was reported. The table also shows the total number of cases and deaths by state and territory.

The source of infection for confirmed cases of COVID-19 can be described as:

  • overseas acquired – the person was infected while overseas (including at sea)
  • locally acquired – known contact – the person was infected in Australia through contact with someone confirmed to have COVID-19
  • locally acquired – unknown contact – the person was infected in Australia, but the source of infection is not known
  • locally acquired –interstate travel – the person was infected in Australia, but not in the reporting jurisdiction
  • under investigation – the source of infection has not yet been determined, but is currently being investigated through public health actions.

The majority of confirmed cases since late October have been overseas acquired.

The number of cases currently under investigation should ideally be as low as possible.

Knowing the source of infection assists in stopping the spread of COVID-19.

A COVID-19 death is defined for surveillance purposes as a death in a probable or confirmed COVID-19 case, unless there is a clear alternative cause of death that cannot be related to COVID19 (e.g. trauma). There should be no period of complete recovery from COVID-19 between illness and death. Where a Coroner’s report is available, these findings are to be observed.

Cases and deaths by age and sex

COVID-19 cases by age group and sex

This graph shows the number of COVID-19 cases for males and females by age group since the first case was reported.

Expand description of COVID-19 cases by age group and sex

This bar chart shows the number of COVID-19 cases for males and females by age group since the first confirmed cases were reported in late January 2020.

The horizontal axis shows the age breakdown in 10-year intervals from zero years old to greater than 90 years old.

The vertical axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 confirmed case is a person who:

  • tests positive to a validated specific SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test or
  • has the virus isolated in cell culture, with PCR confirmation using a validated method or
  • undergoes a seroconversion to or has a significant rise in SARS-CoV-2 neutralising or IgG antibody level (e.g. four-fold or greater rise in titre).

The proportion of COVID-19 cases in males and females is roughly equal, however the ratio does differ across the age groups presented.

Cases have been reported across all age groups. The majority of all cases are reported in those aged 20 to 59 years. The number of cases is highest in the 20–29 years age group.

Cases by age group and sex

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of COVID-19 cases for males and females by age group since the first case was reported.

Expand description of Cases by age group and sex

The data is shown in 3 columns:

  • age group ranges
  • male
  • female.

COVID-19 deaths by age group and sex

This graph shows the number of COVID-19 associated deaths in Australia for males and females by age group since the first case was reported.

Expand description of COVID-19 deaths by age group and sex

This bar chart shows the total number of COVID-19 associated deaths in Australia by age group and sex since the first confirmed cases were reported in late January 2020.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 death is defined for surveillance purposes as a death in a probable or confirmed COVID-19 case, unless there is a clear alternative cause of death that cannot be related to COVID19 (e.g. trauma). There should be no period of complete recovery from COVID-19 between illness and death. Where a Coroner’s report is available, these findings are to be observed.

Deaths have been reported in those aged in their 20s to their 100s. The majority of deaths have been reported in people aged 70 years and over.

The horizontal axis shows the age breakdown in 10-year intervals from zero years old to greater than 90 years old.

The vertical axis shows the number of confirmed COVID-19 deaths.

Deaths by age group and sex

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of COVID-19 associated deaths in Australia for males and females by age group since the first case was reported.

Expand description of Deaths by age group and sex

The data is shown in 3 columns:

  • age group ranges
  • male
  • female.

Tests conducted and results

COVID-19 tests conducted in total in the last 7 days and results

This table shows the number of COVID-19 tests conducted in total and in the last 7 days, the rate of tests in the last 7 days per 100,000 population and the percentage that returned a positive result by state and territory and in Australia, since the first case was reported.

Expand description of COVID-19 tests conducted in total in the last 7 days and results

This table shows the number of tests conducted in Australia and in each state and territory, since the first case was reported in late January 2020 in total and in the last 7 days. This number is not reflective of the number of people that have been tested, but the total number of tests conducted, as individuals may have been tested multiple times. The data are based on information reported by states and territories.

Tests in the last 7 days per 100,000 population represent the number of tests conducted by each state and territory in the last 7 days as a rate of the number of people in the jurisdiction.

The testing positivity rate is also displayed. This positivity rate represents the proportion of all tests that have returned a positive result for COVID-19.

To date, over 13 million tests have been conducted nationally. Of those tests conducted, less than 1% have been positive.

Cases admitted to hospital

Current COVID-19 cases in hospitals and Intensive Care Units (ICUs)

This graph shows the number of COVID-19 cases currently admitted to hospital, including cases in ICUs, in Australia and each state and territory.

Expand description of Current COVID-19 cases in hospitals and Intensive Care Units (ICUs)

This chart shows the number of COVID-19 cases currently in hospital, including cases in ICU, in Australia and each state and territory.

Each bar represents those in ICU and those not in ICU by state and territory.

The horizontal axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases currently hospitalised.

The vertical axis shows the Australian total and each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.

Cases admitted to hospital

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of COVID-19 cases currently admitted to hospital, including cases in ICUs, in Australia and each state and territory.

Expand description of Cases admitted to hospital

The data is shown in 3 columns:

  • jurisdiction – with Australia in total first, then each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.
  • the number of cases not in ICU
  • the number of cases in ICU.

Cases in aged care services

COVID-19 cases in aged care services – residential care

This graph shows the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for people living in Australian Government–subsidised residential aged care facilities.

Expand description of COVID-19 cases in aged care services – residential care

This graph shows the number of confirmed cases, deaths and cases recovered since late January 2020 in those who receive Australian Government–subsidised residential care in each state and territory.

Residential care means people who live in an Australian Government–subsidised aged care facility.

Each bar represents the number of active cases, recovered cases and deaths.

The bottom axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases.

The vertical axis shows the Australian total and each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.

The majority of cases and deaths reported in residential care in Australia have occurred in Victoria.

Cases in aged care services – residential care

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for people living in Australian Government–subsidised residential aged care facilities.

Expand description of Cases in aged care services – residential care

The data is shown in 4 columns:

  • jurisdiction – with Australia in total first, then each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.
  • active cases
  • recovered cases
  • deaths.

COVID-19 outbreaks in Australian residential aged care facilities

Read the weekly report that provides a snapshot of data on the impact of COVID-19 in residential aged care facilities nationally.

The report includes data on the number of services impacted and number of staff and resident cases, as well as workforce, vaccine rollout, testing and PPE provided to affected services to support them.

COVID-19 cases in aged care services – in-home care

This graph shows the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for people receiving Australian Government–subsidised care in their own home.

Expand description of COVID-19 cases in aged care services – in-home care

The number of confirmed cases, deaths and cases recovered since late January 2020 in those who receive Australian Government–subsidised in-home care in Australia and in each state and territory.

In-home care means people who receive Australian Government subsidised care in their own home.

Each bar represents the number of active cases, recovered cases and deaths.

The bottom axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases.

The vertical axis shows the Australian total and each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.

The majority of cases reported in In-home care in Australia are in Victoria.

Cases in aged care services – in-home care

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for people receiving Australian Government–subsidised care in their own home.

Expand description of Cases in aged care services – in-home care

The data is shown in 4 columns:

  • jurisdiction – with Australia in total first, then each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.
  • active cases
  • recovered cases
  • deaths.

How Australia compares with the world

Learn more about the international situation from the World Health Organization (WHO). Read their weekly situation reports and check the WHO COVID-19 dashboard.

Last updated: 
18 June 2021

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