Coronavirus (COVID-19) current situation and case numbers

We are managing the COVID-19 outbreak in Australia as a health emergency. We will update this page every day by 9 pm AEST with the current situation, latest case numbers and related information.

At a glance

The first confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Australia were reported in late January 2020. This page provides a number of visual representations of information about COVID-19 in Australia. Our data is collated and updated every day by 9pm AEST and reflects the previous 24 hours.

Further reports on the incidence, severity and distribution of COVID-19 within Australia are published in the Communicable Diseases Intelligence (CDI) Journal. Additionally, the Coronavirus (COVID-19) common operation picture provides a traffic light report of the COVID-19 situation across Australia.

COVID-19 summary data tables are available through the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS).

COVID-19 summary statistics

The below tiles show the:

  • total number of COVID-19 cases, active cases and deaths recorded in Australia since the first case was reported. Note: the number of active cases is an estimate as states and territories differ in how they collect this data
  • number of locally acquired, including under investigation and overseas acquired cases in the last 24 hours
  • current number of hospitalised cases and tests conducted in the last 24 hours
  • number of locally acquired, including under investigation and overseas acquired cases in the last 7 days.

 

Note: States and territories provide these figures daily. Due to the dynamic nature of case data, state and territory health departments may revise their daily numbers, where historic cases may be added or previously reported cases excluded after further investigation. *Locally acquired cases reported in the last 24 hours and in the last 7 days includes cases reported as under investigation.

covid-19
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Read transcript

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[Music]

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vaccines are one of the most effective

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ways to protect against diseases

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like covert 19. before covert 19

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vaccines can be given to people in

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australia

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they must first be approved by our world

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leading regulator

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the therapeutic goods administration

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known as the tga

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they regulate and approve all vaccines

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medicines and other medical goods in

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australia

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all potential covert 19 vaccines are

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currently going through

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rigorous testing processes they'll be

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carefully assessed for

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safety quality and effectiveness before

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they can be approved

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covet 19 vaccines will only be approved

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if clinical trials can show the benefits

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to australians against covert 19.

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to be approved it must pass a

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comprehensive six-stage

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process and the tga will not cut corners

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[Music]

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a pharmaceutical company or sponsor must

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submit a pre-application

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the tga will look at this against

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clinical data and the need for the

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vaccine

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if the application meets the tga's

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requirements

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the sponsor can then apply to register

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the vaccine for use in australia

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at this point they must include a

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significant amount of clinical and

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non-clinical information

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to support the request

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next the experts at the tga look at the

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available data

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they can ask for more information to

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fill any gaps

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and they can also ask for independent

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advice

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once the vaccine is fully evaluated the

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tga will decide whether to provide

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what they can for an initial

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registration

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the vaccine can now be registered and be

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supplied in australia

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all registered vaccines are closely

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monitored by the tga

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who will respond to any safety issues

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covert 19 vaccines

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will be no different the cga will also

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be checking all

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the covert 19 batches before they are

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released for rollout

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the first approved vaccines will go to

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priority groups

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until we all get vaccinated it's

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important that we continue to be covert

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safe

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by practicing good hygiene physical

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distancing and getting tested

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to learn more visit tga.gov.edu

English (auto-generated)

We are no longer displaying the ‘at a glance’ infographic on this page. Instead, you can view the daily infographics on the collection page.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) at a glance infographic collection

A collection of daily infographics providing a quick view of the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation in Australia each day since 5 April 2020.

Cases, active cases and deaths by state and territory

Locally and overseas acquired COVID-19 cases and deaths by states and territories

This table shows the number of locally or overseas acquired cases, active cases in the last 24 hours, and the total number of confirmed cases and deaths that have occurred in Australia.

Expand description of Locally and overseas acquired COVID-19 cases and deaths by states and territories

State and territory totals reflect where a person has been tested and public health management occurred, which may differ from their normal place of residence.

The majority of total confirmed cases and deaths are from Victoria.

The number of confirmed cases and deaths reported in each state and territory since the first case was reported in late January 2020. State and territory totals reflect where a person has been tested and public health management occurred, which may differ from their normal place of residence.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 confirmed case is a person who:

  • tests positive to a validated specific SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test or
  • has the virus isolated in cell culture, with PCR confirmation using a validated method or
  • undergoes a seroconversion to or has a significant rise in SARS-CoV-2 neutralising or IgG antibody level (e.g. four-fold or greater rise in titre).

Probable and historical cases are currently included in the total number of cases reported by some jurisdictions, these are defined as per the COVID-19 national guidelines.

A COVID-19 death is defined for surveillance purposes as a death in a probable or confirmed COVID-19 case, unless there is a clear alternative cause of death that cannot be related to COVID19 (e.g. trauma). There should be no period of complete recovery from COVID-19 between illness and death. Where a Coroner’s report is available, these findings are to be observed.

The method used to estimate the number of active cases varies by jurisdiction.

Find out more about the current situation in your state or territory:

Daily reported cases

Daily and cumulative number of reported COVID-19 cases in Australia

This graph shows the total number of new COVID-19 cases in Australia reported each day by states and territories and the cumulative number of confirmed COVID-19 cases reported over time. These figures are collated and updated by 9 pm AEST each day and reflect the previous 24 hours.

Expand description of Daily and cumulative number of reported COVID-19 cases in Australia

This bar chart shows the newly confirmed COVID-19 cases by notification received date.

The line graph shows the cumulative number of newly confirmed COVID-19 cases by notification received date.

The horizontal axis shows the date of notification to state and territory health departments.

The vertical axis on the left shows the number of new COVID-19 cases, represented by the bars.

The vertical axis on the right shows the cumulative number of COVID-19 cases, represented by the line.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 confirmed case is a person who:

  • tests positive to a validated specific SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test or
  • has the virus isolated in cell culture, with PCR confirmation using a validated method or
  • undergoes a seroconversion to or has a significant rise in SARS-CoV-2 neutralising or IgG antibody level (e.g. four-fold or greater rise in titre).

The first cases of COVID-19 in Australia were identified in late January 2020. Following a peak of cases at the end of March, low numbers of cases were reported each day until early-June 2020. From mid-June 2020, cases increased and peaked in early August 2020 and then declined. Since late-September 2020, a low number of new cases continue to be reported each day. 

Cases by source of infection

COVID-19 cases by source of infection

This table shows the total number of COVID-19 cases in each state and territory as well as nationally, since the first case was reported, by source of infection.

Expand description of COVID-19 cases by source of infection

This table shows the total number of COVID-19 cases in each state and territory as well as nationally, since the first case was reported, by source of infection.

The source of infection for confirmed cases of COVID-19 can be described as:

  • overseas acquired – the person was infected while overseas (including at sea)
  • locally acquired – known contact – the person was infected in Australia through contact with someone confirmed to have COVID-19
  • locally acquired – unknown contact – the person was infected in Australia, but the source of infection is not known
  • locally acquired –interstate travel – the person was infected in Australia, but not in the reporting jurisdiction
  • under investigation – the source of infection has not yet been determined, but is currently being investigated through public health actions.

The majority of confirmed cases since late October have been overseas acquired.

The number of cases currently under investigation should ideally be as low as possible.

Knowing the source of infection assists in stopping the spread of COVID-19.

Cases and deaths by age and sex

COVID-19 cases by age group and sex

This graph shows the number of COVID-19 cases for males and females by age group since the first case was reported.

Expand description of COVID-19 cases by age group and sex

This bar chart shows the number of COVID-19 cases for males and females by age group since the first confirmed cases were reported in late January 2020.

The horizontal axis shows the age breakdown in 10-year intervals from zero years old to greater than 90 years old.

The vertical axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 confirmed case is a person who:

  • tests positive to a validated specific SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test or
  • has the virus isolated in cell culture, with PCR confirmation using a validated method or
  • undergoes a seroconversion to or has a significant rise in SARS-CoV-2 neutralising or IgG antibody level (e.g. four-fold or greater rise in titre).

The proportion of COVID-19 cases in males and females is roughly equal, however the ratio does differ across the age groups presented.

Cases have been reported across all age groups. The majority of all cases are reported in those aged 20 to 59 years. The number of cases is highest in the 20–29 years age group.

COVID-19 deaths by age group and sex

This graph shows the number of COVID-19 associated deaths in Australia for males and females by age group since the first case was reported.

Expand description of COVID-19 deaths by age group and sex

This bar chart shows the total number of COVID-19 associated deaths in Australia by age group and sex since the first confirmed cases were reported in late January 2020.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 death is defined for surveillance purposes as a death in a probable or confirmed COVID-19 case, unless there is a clear alternative cause of death that cannot be related to COVID19 (e.g. trauma). There should be no period of complete recovery from COVID-19 between illness and death. Where a Coroner’s report is available, these findings are to be observed.

Deaths have been reported in those aged in their 20s to their 100s. The majority of deaths have been reported in people aged 70 years and over.

The horizontal axis shows the age breakdown in 10-year intervals from zero years old to greater than 90 years old.

The vertical axis shows the number of confirmed COVID-19 deaths.

Tests conducted and results

COVID-19 tests conducted in total in the last 7 days and results

This table shows the number of COVID-19 tests conducted in total and in the last 7 days, the rate of tests in the last 7 days per 100,000 population and the percentage that returned a positive result by state and territory and in Australia, since the first case was reported.

Expand description of COVID-19 tests conducted in total in the last 7 days and results

This table shows the number of tests conducted in Australia and in each state and territory, since the first case was reported in late January 2020 in total and in the last 7 days. This number is not reflective of the number of people that have been tested, but the total number of tests conducted, as individuals may have been tested multiple times. The data are based on information reported by states and territories.

Tests in the last 7 days per 100,000 population represent the number of tests conducted by each state and territory in the last 7 days as a rate of the number of people in the jurisdiction.

The testing positivity rate is also displayed. This positivity rate represents the proportion of all tests that have returned a positive result for COVID-19.

To date, over 13 million tests have been conducted nationally. Of those tests conducted, less than 1% have been positive.

Cases admitted to hospital

Current COVID-19 cases in hospitals and Intensive Care Units (ICUs)

This graph shows the number of COVID-19 cases currently admitted to hospital, including cases in ICUs, in Australia and each state and territory.

Expand description of Current COVID-19 cases in hospitals and Intensive Care Units (ICUs)

This chart shows the number of COVID-19 cases currently in hospital, including cases in ICU, in Australia and each state and territory.

Each bar represents those in ICU and those not in ICU by state and territory.

The horizontal axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases currently hospitalised.

The vertical axis shows the Australian total and each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.

Cases in aged care services

COVID-19 cases in aged care services – residential care

This graph shows the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for people living in Australian Government–subsidised residential aged care facilities.

Expand description of COVID-19 cases in aged care services – residential care

This graph shows the number of confirmed cases, deaths and cases recovered since late January 2020 in those who receive Australian Government–subsidised residential care in each state and territory.

Residential care means people who live in an Australian Government–subsidised aged care facility.

Each bar represents the number of active cases, recovered cases and deaths.

The bottom axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases.

The vertical axis shows the Australian total and each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.

The majority of cases and deaths reported in residential care in Australia have occurred in Victoria.

COVID-19 outbreaks in Australian residential aged care facilities

Read the weekly report that provides a snapshot of data on the impact of COVID-19 in residential aged care facilities nationally.

The report includes data on the number of services impacted and number of staff and resident cases, as well as workforce, testing and PPE provided to affected services to support them.

COVID-19 cases in aged care services – in-home care

This graph shows the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for people receiving Australian Government–subsidised care in their own home.

Expand description of COVID-19 cases in aged care services – in-home care

The number of confirmed cases, deaths and cases recovered since late January 2020 in those who receive Australian Government–subsidised in-home care in Australia and in each state and territory.

In-home care means people who receive Australian Government subsidised care in their own home.

Each bar represents the number of active cases, recovered cases and deaths.

The bottom axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases.

The vertical axis shows the Australian total and each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.

The majority of cases reported in In-home care in Australia are in Victoria.

How Australia compares with the world

Learn more about the international situation from the World Health Organization (WHO). Read their weekly situation reports and check the WHO COVID-19 dashboard.

Last updated: 
3 March 2021

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