For health professionals

Health workers, nurses and doctors can work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families to prevent and treat ear disease. Care for Kids’ Ears resources can support you to educate parents, carers and children on how to keep ears healthy.

How you can help

Health workers, nurses and doctors who work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families can help prevent ear disease and hearing loss by:

  • checking children’s ears whenever they visit the health service (even if they are there for another reason)
  • explaining how to prevent ear disease
  • explaining the symptoms of ear disease, including that it doesn’t always cause pain or other symptoms
  • explaining the link between ear disease and hearing loss
  • explaining that ear disease and hearing loss are not normal and need treatment.

'Kids’ ears should be checked every time they’re at the clinic. If they’re coming in for an immunisation, a chest infection, or even a splinter on their toe – check their ears. A quick 10-minute test can make all the difference. It’s impossible to overestimate the importance of kids’ hearing.' Sandi Nelson – ear and hearing health worker, NT

How Care for Kids’ Ears resources can help

Educating parents and carers about ear health is a big part of preventing ear disease.

The Care for Kids’ Ears resources can help do this in a way that is engaging and easy to understand. They can help you explain:

  • how to keep ears healthy
  • how to recognise ear disease
  • what to do if children have a sore ear
  • the importance of having regular ear checks.

The talking book provides these messages in 21 Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander languages.

Resources

Care for Kids’ Ears – Order resources

If you care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, you can order Care for Kids' Ears resources for free, including brochures, booklets, activity books, crayons and stickers. You can also download and print as many copies as you like.

The Otitis Media Guidelines help health professionals deliver effective and appropriate care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with otitis media.

PLUM and HATS tools help health and early childhood workers ask family members the right questions to find out whether children are on track with their listening and talking. 

HealthInfoNet shares and exchanges evidence-based, quality-assured research to support people who work in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, including in ear and hearing health.

Last updated: 
20 September 2021

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