Date published: 
3 July 2020
Media type: 
Transcript
Audience: 
General public

DAVID CAMPBELL:

Now, state governments are scrambling to contain Victoria's virus crisis as it explodes across borders. Cases now confirmed in both New South Wales and the NT. And this morning, word even more Melbourne suburbs could go into lockdown.

ALLISON LANGDON:

Joining us is Deputy Chief Medical Officer Professor Michael Kidd in Canberra. Professor, thank you for your time this morning. At least 60 of Victoria's new cases over the past two days have been detected outside of these quarantined suburbs. Does that mean more lockdowns are inevitable?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Well clearly, the Victorian health authorities and the Victorian Government will be monitoring very closely what's happening with the pattern of transmission that we're seeing in Melbourne at this time. It's very concerning that, obviously, that the outbreak continues and we need to see what happens over the next few days, of course, before decisions like that will be made.

DAVID CAMPBELL:

Sure, but it has spread interstate now. How was a man who tested positive in hotel quarantine, then just let out, cleared to fly to Sydney, without another test?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Well, the pattern when people have been diagnosed with COVID-19 is that they are required- we follow them for ten days and see what's happened with them, and as long as they've been clear of symptoms for 72 hours then they're regarded as no longer being infectious to other people. I don't know the details of the person who was released from quarantine in Melbourne but we'll find out more about that, I expect, during the coming hours.

ALLISON LANGDON:

Well, what we do know is that 50 people at Woolworths in Balmain where he works now have to self-isolate, and everyone in that suburb are being told: if you have any symptoms get tested. I mean, it's a monumental stuff up.

MICHAEL KIDD:

Absolutely, and the message there, of course, is for everyone in Australia, anyone who has symptoms, no matter how middle of cold or flu or fever, should be staying at home and arranging to get tested. And of course, that applies with the outbreaks that we're seeing, but it also applies to all of us across the country.

DAVID CAMPBELL:

We also hear about this woman who got on a train to Sydney after getting a COVID test, she's waiting for the test results. People just- you know, there's a call from Gladys Berejiklian yesterday, we need to trust people to do the right thing; but people aren't doing the right thing. They're starting to relax, they're desperate to get out of quarantine themselves or the restrictions. So do we need to put the stronger measures back?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Well, I think that what we're seeing with the outbreak in Melbourne is, I hope, giving a bit of jolt to everyone right across the country. We are living with COVID-19, this pandemic is certainly not over when you look at what's happening, both within our country and overseas as well. We all still need to be taking this really seriously, David, and all of us need to be doing our part to continue to stop the spread. I think when the restrictions initially started to be lifted, perhaps many people did think that this was over, but it isn't. We're living with this at the moment, and of course we will be for some time to come.

DAVID CAMPBELL:

We had Jacqui Lambie this morning and she was calling that maybe we should all start wearing masks again when we go out - do you think that's the right thing to do?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Well, the advice from the AHPPC is that we don't recommend mask wearing unless you're in an area where there is community transmission occurring, or if you are getting into a situation where you are unable to maintain physical distancing. For example, getting onto crowded public transport, and you may feel comfortable wearing a mask. So certainly, for people in the lockdown areas in Melbourne, it would be totally appropriate for people to be wearing masks when they are outside their homes, especially if they're going into a situation where they feel they may not be able to maintain the physical distancing. But, not in other parts of the country at this time.

ALLISON LANGDON:

Professor, you're talking about how we all need to take this seriously. I just don't think people are any more, or that people have this sense that the rules apply to everyone else and not to them. The problem we've got, is when we see these mistakes being made, when we see someone let out of hotel quarantine when they've still got coronavirus and travelling interstate, when we see someone then arrive in the Northern Territory from Melbourne, a place that hasn't had a case since early April; these mistakes affect all of us and they are incredibly costly.

MICHAEL KIDD:

They are indeed. I think the example, though, of the man who went to the Northern Territory, soon as he developed symptoms, he did exactly the right thing. He arranged to get tested, he stayed in isolation, and so that allows the authorities to very quickly follow up with any contacts he may have had. So, many people are doing the right thing, many people are adhering to the measures which have been in place now for a considerable time. We all know what we should be doing, Ally, and I think that what we've been seeing over the last week, hopefully this will reinforce that for everybody. We've all got to do our part if we're going to stop the spread of COVID-19 and the impacts.

The other thing we saw, of course, yesterday, we've got an increase in the number of people now in hospital and in intensive care units in Australia which reinforces just how serious this disease is. And of course, we now have 300,000 people in lockdown, and we're very concerned about the mental health and wellbeing of those people. So, this is really serious. It may not be affecting you or your family right now, but it could be. So, please continue to adhere to the measures that we all need to do.

ALLISON LANGDON:

And super quickly, you still believe schools are safe?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Yes, we know that schools are safe and we've seen that over recent months. We know that the level of transmission between children is very, very low.

ALLISON LANGDON:

Okay. Alright, Professor, thanks for joining us this morning, we appreciate it.

Now, state governments are scrambling to contain Victoria's virus crisis as it explodes across borders. Cases now confirmed in both New South Wales and the NT. And this morning, word even more Melbourne suburbs could go into lockdown.

ALLISON LANGDON:

Joining us is Deputy Chief Medical Officer Professor Michael Kidd in Canberra. Professor, thank you for your time this morning. At least 60 of Victoria's new cases over the past two days have been detected outside of these quarantined suburbs. Does that mean more lockdowns are inevitable?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Well clearly, the Victorian health authorities and the Victorian Government will be monitoring very closely what's happening with the pattern of transmission that we're seeing in Melbourne at this time. It's very concerning that, obviously, that the outbreak continues and we need to see what happens over the next few days, of course, before decisions like that will be made.

DAVID CAMPBELL:

Sure, but it has spread interstate now. How was a man who tested positive in hotel quarantine, then just let out, cleared to fly to Sydney, without another test?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Well, the pattern when people have been diagnosed with COVID-19 is that they are required- we follow them for ten days and see what's happened with them, and as long as they've been clear of symptoms for 72 hours then they're regarded as no longer being infectious to other people. I don't know the details of the person who was released from quarantine in Melbourne but we'll find out more about that, I expect, during the coming hours.

ALLISON LANGDON:

Well, what we do know is that 50 people at Woolworths in Balmain where he works now have to self-isolate, and everyone in that suburb are being told: if you have any symptoms get tested. I mean, it's a monumental stuff up.

MICHAEL KIDD:

Absolutely, and the message there, of course, is for everyone in Australia, anyone who has symptoms, no matter how middle of cold or flu or fever, should be staying at home and arranging to get tested. And of course, that applies with the outbreaks that we're seeing, but it also applies to all of us across the country.

DAVID CAMPBELL:

We also hear about this woman who got on a train to Sydney after getting a COVID test, she's waiting for the test results. People just- you know, there's a call from Gladys Berejiklian yesterday, we need to trust people to do the right thing; but people aren't doing the right thing. They're starting to relax, they're desperate to get out of quarantine themselves or the restrictions. So do we need to put the stronger measures back?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Well, I think that what we're seeing with the outbreak in Melbourne is, I hope, giving a bit of jolt to everyone right across the country. We are living with COVID-19, this pandemic is certainly not over when you look at what's happening, both within our country and overseas as well. We all still need to be taking this really seriously, David, and all of us need to be doing our part to continue to stop the spread. I think when the restrictions initially started to be lifted, perhaps many people did think that this was over, but it isn't. We're living with this at the moment, and of course we will be for some time to come.

DAVID CAMPBELL:

Now, state governments are scrambling to contain Victoria's virus crisis as it explodes across borders. Cases now confirmed in both New South Wales and the NT. And this morning, word even more Melbourne suburbs could go into lockdown.

ALLISON LANGDON:

Joining us is Deputy Chief Medical Officer Professor Michael Kidd in Canberra. Professor, thank you for your time this morning. At least 60 of Victoria's new cases over the past two days have been detected outside of these quarantined suburbs. Does that mean more lockdowns are inevitable?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Well clearly, the Victorian health authorities and the Victorian Government will be monitoring very closely what's happening with the pattern of transmission that we're seeing in Melbourne at this time. It's very concerning that, obviously, that the outbreak continues and we need to see what happens over the next few days, of course, before decisions like that will be made.

DAVID CAMPBELL:

Sure, but it has spread interstate now. How was a man who tested positive in hotel quarantine, then just let out, cleared to fly to Sydney, without another test?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Well, the pattern when people have been diagnosed with COVID-19 is that they are required- we follow them for ten days and see what's happened with them, and as long as they've been clear of symptoms for 72 hours then they're regarded as no longer being infectious to other people. I don't know the details of the person who was released from quarantine in Melbourne but we'll find out more about that, I expect, during the coming hours.

ALLISON LANGDON:

Well, what we do know is that 50 people at Woolworths in Balmain where he works now have to self-isolate, and everyone in that suburb are being told: if you have any symptoms get tested. I mean, it's a monumental stuff up.

MICHAEL KIDD:

Absolutely, and the message there, of course, is for everyone in Australia, anyone who has symptoms, no matter how middle of cold or flu or fever, should be staying at home and arranging to get tested. And of course, that applies with the outbreaks that we're seeing, but it also applies to all of us across the country.

DAVID CAMPBELL:

We also hear about this woman who got on a train to Sydney after getting a COVID test, she's waiting for the test results. People just- you know, there's a call from Gladys Berejiklian yesterday, we need to trust people to do the right thing; but people aren't doing the right thing. They're starting to relax, they're desperate to get out of quarantine themselves or the restrictions. So do we need to put the stronger measures back?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Well, I think that what we're seeing with the outbreak in Melbourne is, I hope, giving a bit of jolt to everyone right across the country. We are living with COVID-19, this pandemic is certainly not over when you look at what's happening, both within our country and overseas as well. We all still need to be taking this really seriously, David, and all of us need to be doing our part to continue to stop the spread. I think when the restrictions initially started to be lifted, perhaps many people did think that this was over, but it isn't. We're living with this at the moment, and of course we will be for some time to come.

DAVID CAMPBELL:

We had Jacqui Lambie this morning and she was calling that maybe we should all start wearing masks again when we go out - do you think that's the right thing to do?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Well, the advice from the AHPPC is that we don't recommend mask wearing unless you're in an area where there is community transmission occurring, or if you are getting into a situation where you are unable to maintain physical distancing. For example, getting onto crowded public transport, and you may feel comfortable wearing a mask. So certainly, for people in the lockdown areas in Melbourne, it would be totally appropriate for people to be wearing masks when they are outside their homes, especially if they're going into a situation where they feel they may not be able to maintain the physical distancing. But, not in other parts of the country at this time.

ALLISON LANGDON:

Professor, you're talking about how we all need to take this seriously. I just don't think people are any more, or that people have this sense that the rules apply to everyone else and not to them. The problem we've got, is when we see these mistakes being made, when we see someone let out of hotel quarantine when they've still got coronavirus and travelling interstate, when we see someone then arrive in the Northern Territory from Melbourne, a place that hasn't had a case since early April; these mistakes affect all of us and they are incredibly costly.

MICHAEL KIDD:

They are indeed. I think the example, though, of the man who went to the Northern Territory, soon as he developed symptoms, he did exactly the right thing. He arranged to get tested, he stayed in isolation, and so that allows the authorities to very quickly follow up with any contacts he may have had. So, many people are doing the right thing, many people are adhering to the measures which have been in place now for a considerable time. We all know what we should be doing, Ally, and I think that what we've been seeing over the last week, hopefully this will reinforce that for everybody. We've all got to do our part if we're going to stop the spread of COVID-19 and the impacts.

The other thing we saw, of course, yesterday, we've got an increase in the number of people now in hospital and in intensive care units in Australia which reinforces just how serious this disease is. And of course, we now have 300,000 people in lockdown, and we're very concerned about the mental health and wellbeing of those people. So, this is really serious. It may not be affecting you or your family right now, but it could be. So, please continue to adhere to the measures that we all need to do.

ALLISON LANGDON:

And super quickly, you still believe schools are safe?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Yes, we know that schools are safe and we've seen that over recent months. We know that the level of transmission between children is very, very low.

ALLISON LANGDON:

Okay. Alright, Professor, thanks for joining us this morning, we appreciate it.

DAVID CAMPBELL:

Now, state governments are scrambling to contain Victoria's virus crisis as it explodes across borders. Cases now confirmed in both New South Wales and the NT. And this morning, word even more Melbourne suburbs could go into lockdown.

ALLISON LANGDON:

Joining us is Deputy Chief Medical Officer Professor Michael Kidd in Canberra. Professor, thank you for your time this morning. At least 60 of Victoria's new cases over the past two days have been detected outside of these quarantined suburbs. Does that mean more lockdowns are inevitable?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Well clearly, the Victorian health authorities and the Victorian Government will be monitoring very closely what's happening with the pattern of transmission that we're seeing in Melbourne at this time. It's very concerning that, obviously, that the outbreak continues and we need to see what happens over the next few days, of course, before decisions like that will be made.

DAVID CAMPBELL:

Sure, but it has spread interstate now. How was a man who tested positive in hotel quarantine, then just let out, cleared to fly to Sydney, without another test?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Well, the pattern when people have been diagnosed with COVID-19 is that they are required- we follow them for ten days and see what's happened with them, and as long as they've been clear of symptoms for 72 hours then they're regarded as no longer being infectious to other people. I don't know the details of the person who was released from quarantine in Melbourne but we'll find out more about that, I expect, during the coming hours.

ALLISON LANGDON:

Well, what we do know is that 50 people at Woolworths in Balmain where he works now have to self-isolate, and everyone in that suburb are being told: if you have any symptoms get tested. I mean, it's a monumental stuff up.

MICHAEL KIDD:

Absolutely, and the message there, of course, is for everyone in Australia, anyone who has symptoms, no matter how middle of cold or flu or fever, should be staying at home and arranging to get tested. And of course, that applies with the outbreaks that we're seeing, but it also applies to all of us across the country.

DAVID CAMPBELL:

We also hear about this woman who got on a train to Sydney after getting a COVID test, she's waiting for the test results. People just- you know, there's a call from Gladys Berejiklian yesterday, we need to trust people to do the right thing; but people aren't doing the right thing. They're starting to relax, they're desperate to get out of quarantine themselves or the restrictions. So do we need to put the stronger measures back?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Well, I think that what we're seeing with the outbreak in Melbourne is, I hope, giving a bit of jolt to everyone right across the country. We are living with COVID-19, this pandemic is certainly not over when you look at what's happening, both within our country and overseas as well. We all still need to be taking this really seriously, David, and all of us need to be doing our part to continue to stop the spread. I think when the restrictions initially started to be lifted, perhaps many people did think that this was over, but it isn't. We're living with this at the moment, and of course we will be for some time to come.

DAVID CAMPBELL:

We had Jacqui Lambie this morning and she was calling that maybe we should all start wearing masks again when we go out - do you think that's the right thing to do?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Well, the advice from the AHPPC is that we don't recommend mask wearing unless you're in an area where there is community transmission occurring, or if you are getting into a situation where you are unable to maintain physical distancing. For example, getting onto crowded public transport, and you may feel comfortable wearing a mask. So certainly, for people in the lockdown areas in Melbourne, it would be totally appropriate for people to be wearing masks when they are outside their homes, especially if they're going into a situation where they feel they may not be able to maintain the physical distancing. But, not in other parts of the country at this time.

ALLISON LANGDON:

Professor, you're talking about how we all need to take this seriously. I just don't think people are any more, or that people have this sense that the rules apply to everyone else and not to them. The problem we've got, is when we see these mistakes being made, when we see someone let out of hotel quarantine when they've still got coronavirus and travelling interstate, when we see someone then arrive in the Northern Territory from Melbourne, a place that hasn't had a case since early April; these mistakes affect all of us and they are incredibly costly.

MICHAEL KIDD:

They are indeed. I think the example, though, of the man who went to the Northern Territory, soon as he developed symptoms, he did exactly the right thing. He arranged to get tested, he stayed in isolation, and so that allows the authorities to very quickly follow up with any contacts he may have had. So, many people are doing the right thing, many people are adhering to the measures which have been in place now for a considerable time. We all know what we should be doing, Ally, and I think that what we've been seeing over the last week, hopefully this will reinforce that for everybody. We've all got to do our part if we're going to stop the spread of COVID-19 and the impacts.

The other thing we saw, of course, yesterday, we've got an increase in the number of people now in hospital and in intensive care units in Australia which reinforces just how serious this disease is. And of course, we now have 300,000 people in lockdown, and we're very concerned about the mental health and wellbeing of those people. So, this is really serious. It may not be affecting you or your family right now, but it could be. So, please continue to adhere to the measures that we all need to do.

ALLISON LANGDON:

And super quickly, you still believe schools are safe?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Yes, we know that schools are safe and we've seen that over recent months. We know that the level of transmission between children is very, very low.

ALLISON LANGDON:

Okay. Alright, Professor, thanks for joining us this morning, we appreciate it.

We had Jacqui Lambie this morning and she was calling that maybe we should all start wearing masks again when we go out - do you think that's the right thing to do?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Well, the advice from the AHPPC is that we don't recommend mask wearing unless you're in an area where there is community transmission occurring, or if you are getting into a situation where you are unable to maintain physical distancing. For example, getting onto crowded public transport, and you may feel comfortable wearing a mask. So certainly, for people in the lockdown areas in Melbourne, it would be totally appropriate for people to be wearing masks when they are outside their homes, especially if they're going into a situation where they feel they may not be able to maintain the physical distancing. But, not in other parts of the country at this time.

ALLISON LANGDON:

Professor, you're talking about how we all need to take this seriously. I just don't think people are any more, or that people have this sense that the rules apply to everyone else and not to them. The problem we've got, is when we see these mistakes being made, when we see someone let out of hotel quarantine when they've still got coronavirus and travelling interstate, when we see someone then arrive in the Northern Territory from Melbourne, a place that hasn't had a case since early April; these mistakes affect all of us and they are incredibly costly.

MICHAEL KIDD:

They are indeed. I think the example, though, of the man who went to the Northern Territory, soon as he developed symptoms, he did exactly the right thing. He arranged to get tested, he stayed in isolation, and so that allows the authorities to very quickly follow up with any contacts he may have had. So, many people are doing the right thing, many people are adhering to the measures which have been in place now for a considerable time. We all know what we should be doing, Ally, and I think that what we've been seeing over the last week, hopefully this will reinforce that for everybody. We've all got to do our part if we're going to stop the spread of COVID-19 and the impacts.

The other thing we saw, of course, yesterday, we've got an increase in the number of people now in hospital and in intensive care units in Australia which reinforces just how serious this disease is. And of course, we now have 300,000 people in lockdown, and we're very concerned about the mental health and wellbeing of those people. So, this is really serious. It may not be affecting you or your family right now, but it could be. So, please continue to adhere to the measures that we all need to do.

ALLISON LANGDON:

And super quickly, you still believe schools are safe?

MICHAEL KIDD:

Yes, we know that schools are safe and we've seen that over recent months. We know that the level of transmission between children is very, very low.

ALLISON LANGDON:

Okay. Alright, Professor, thanks for joining us this morning, we appreciate it.

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