Influenza vaccination in pregnancy

A flu vaccination during pregnancy protects you and your newborn for their first six months.

Influenza is a serious disease for pregnant women and their babies

Influenza is not just a cold. It is a serious disease for pregnant women and the developing and newborn baby.

A flu vaccination during pregnancy not only protects you, it also protects your newborn for their first six months.

It's free for pregnant women under the National Immunisation Program (NIP).

Read more about immunisation during pregnancy

Why you should vaccinate against influenza in pregnancy

Influenza vaccination is safe, free and recommended for pregnant women in each pregnancy.

Receiving the influenza vaccine when pregnant is the best way to protect your newborn baby against influenza and other complications that can harm developing babies.

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A flu vaccination while pregnant protects you and protects your newborn for their first six months.

Flu vaccination is safe at every trimester and it’s free for pregnant women.

Speak to your health professional.

Authorised by the Australian Government, Canberra.

Vaccination when pregnant protects your baby

By getting vaccinated, you pass on protective antibodies to your baby through the placenta which protects them in their first few months of life, when they are most vulnerable and too young to have the influenza vaccine themselves.

The whooping cough (pertussis) vaccine is also recommended and provided free for pregnant women.

Our maternal vaccinations consumer brochure has more information on flu and vaccination in pregnancy.

Influenza vaccination is safe at any stage of pregnancy

Vaccination during pregnancy is a safe and effective way to protect pregnant women and their babies against flu.

Studies of women vaccinated in pregnancy have found no evidence that the flu vaccine harms their developing babies.

Find out more about vaccine safety in Australia

Authorised by the Australian Government, Canberra