Coronavirus (COVID-19) case numbers and statistics

This page provides updates about the current situation, latest case numbers and related information. It is updated every day by 9 pm AEST and reflects the previous 24 hours.

We are managing the COVID-19 outbreak in Australia as a health emergency.  This page provides a number of visual representations of information about COVID-19 in Australia.

COVID-19 summary statistics

 

 

The above tiles show the:

  • number of locally acquired, overseas acquired and under investigation cases in the last 24 hours
  • current number of active cases, hospitalised cases and tests conducted in the last 24 hours. Note: the number of active cases is an estimate as states and territories differ in how they collect this data
  • total number of cases, deaths and tests.

Note: States and territories provide these figures daily. Due to the dynamic nature of case data, state and territory health departments may revise their daily numbers, where historic cases may be added or previously reported cases excluded after further investigation.

NSW locally acquired figures include those reported as locally acquired - investigation ongoing. ACT and Victoria cases reported as under investigation likely represent cases that are locally acquired, however their links to other cases are still under investigation.

Daily data on the status of Australia's COVID-19 vaccine rollout is now available. This includes a detailed infographic and breakdown of vaccine doses administered across Australia. See the latest data on Australia's vaccine rollout.

Top 3 – Dr Steph Davis
8:06
Read transcript

My name is Steph Davis I'm a Deputy Chief Medical Officer at the Commonwealth Department of Health. Thank you all for joining us for these top three questions today. Before I go any further I would just like to acknowledge that here in Canberra today I'm speaking from Ngunnawal country and I would like to pay my respects to the traditional custodians of this land and extend those respects to traditional custody and on the land of which others are tuning into this video from today and also to extend those respects to any Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

who are watching or in the room with us today.

My shout out today is to all the carers in our community. It is Carers

Week this week. I found out today there are over 2.65 million carers in Australia. I can just say that it is an amazing job you are doing and I just want to thank you all for the amazing and ongoing support and love you give to those you care for. So, thank you.

So, the first question I got today is, what is the difference between vaccination and immunisation?  And it's a really good question. Because although the terms are often used interchangeably, they actually mean slightly different things. So, vaccination is the process by which we get the vaccine. They can be injected into your arm, or your leg if you were a baby, or it can be given orally like some vaccines are. Immunisation includes both the process by which we get the vaccine and also the process by which our body develops an immune response. So, what I mean by this, this really comes back to the basics of what the vaccine does. The vaccine primes our body so that if we come into contact with the disease, we are already ready to fight it. So, when you get a vaccine, it tells our body exactly what it shows our body how to recognise the disease when we come into contact with it. It primes it to fight the disease which means it will either stop us getting infected with the disease or stop us from getting

severely unwell with the disease. And when it is finished the process of telling our body how to fight it, that is the process of immunisation compared with vaccination, which is just getting the vaccine itself. So, coming back to the COVID-19 vaccine, vaccination of COVID-19 vaccine is getting it in your arm. Immunisation is the process by which your body develops an immune response to the COVID-19 disease and will stop you from either getting the disease and particularly stops you from getting really severely unwell from the disease or dying from the disease. As always, have to do my shout out here and remind everyone if you haven't got your COVID-19 vaccine yet and you are able to do so, please book in as soon as you can. It's really important both for you and for our community generally.

So, my second question today, is what is myocarditis and pericarditis and does the COVID-

19 vaccine cause these?

Myocarditis is the inflammation of the heart muscle. Pericarditis is inflammation of the thin sack

which surrounds the heart. So, both myocarditis and pericarditis have been linked to mRNA - containing vaccines. That is the Pfizer vaccine and the Moderna vaccine's. They seem to

be particularly common or more common in males under the age of 30. So it sounds pretty scary when you talk about heart inflammation being linked to a vaccine but we need to keep a couple of things in context here. First of all, the vast majority of people who have had pericarditis or myocarditis

after receiving their vaccine have had very, very mild cases of the disease in which they recover completely, with no ongoing long-term effects. The second thing to remember is that these are

extremely, extremely rare complications. The overall rate amongst those who have received the Pfizer vaccine appears to be about 2.7 per 100,000 people, who get the vaccine. And this is the third point, which is the most important, is that this rate is much lower than the rate of pericarditis and

myocarditis from getting COVID-19 disease itself. The rate of that is about 11 per 100,000 people. So again, for the vast majority of people, the benefits of getting the vaccine are going to outweigh the potential risks of getting the vaccine. Really important to know again that these kind of safety signals are people are keeping a very close eye on them both in the Therapeutic Goods Administration, and ATAGI, the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation, meet regularly to discuss any kind of signals that could indicate any side effects or other kind of effects which are occurring due to the vaccine and take all of these into consideration in their ongoing recommendations.

Now, my third question today is, does the level of protection from COVID-19 vaccine weaken over time and does it matter?

Again, a really good question. So, the answer to this one is we don't absolutely know at the

moment. I know that's not a very satisfying answer but as with so many things in this pandemic we are learning as we go, and that is just the nature of a new disease. So, there are a couple more things to say about that. Look, there is a lot of research going on in this area. As I mentioned before, the

Therapeutic Goods Administration and ATAGI, the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation, are constantly looking at whether or not or how long protection from vaccines lasts and whether or not it means we need a booster shot. There is a lot of ongoing work looking at what is being done overseas and that is looking at both peoples immune response to the vaccine and also whether or not they actually get the disease after a period of time. You may have read or seen that 1/3 shot is being currently recommended for some Australians. This was a recommendation that came from ATAGI about a 1/3 shot being for those people who suffer from immunocompromised. There are various conditions that might lead you to being immunocompromised, things like receiving chemotherapy for cancer, some other conditions receiving very high-dose steroids and other particular medications or diseases that might could cause you to be immunocompromised and therefore not being able to mount that immune response. In response to the vaccine itself. A 1/3 shot is

been recommended for this group not as a booster but to bring their levels of protection up to that of the general Australian population. So it is really completion of the primary course that is, most of us get two shots for our primary course. People who are immunocompromised need three shots for the same level of protection, rather than being a booster in and of itself. In terms of boosters for the rest of the population, it's really going to be a matter of watching this space

and it's going to a matter of watching this space for a while. As to whether we will need a single booster, more than one booster or whether it's going to turn into a annual or slightly less.

frequently than annual shot. For example, like the flu vaccines. So, that is my top three questions for today.

Thank you very much to everyone who has joined in. I hope this was helpful. Thank you particularly, to Linda who is always very patient with me and does such a great job of interpreting and hopefully I will see you all again soon.

We are no longer displaying the ‘at a glance’ infographic on this page. Instead, you can view the daily infographics on the collection page.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) at a glance infographic collection

A collection of daily infographics providing a quick view of the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation in Australia each day since 5 April 2020.

Recently reported cases by state and territory and source of infection

Local, overseas acquired and under investigation cases by states and territories

This table shows the number of cases by source of infection in the last 24 hours and last 7 days as well as the number of active cases that have occurred in Australia.

Expand description of Local, overseas acquired and under investigation cases by states and territories

State and territory totals reflect where a person has been tested and public health management occurred, which may differ from their normal place of residence.

The majority of total confirmed cases and deaths are from Victoria.

The number of confirmed cases and deaths reported in each state and territory since the first case was reported in late January 2020. State and territory totals reflect where a person has been tested and public health management occurred, which may differ from their normal place of residence.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 confirmed case is a person who:

  • tests positive to a validated specific SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test or
  • has the virus isolated in cell culture, with PCR confirmation using a validated method or
  • undergoes a seroconversion to or has a significant rise in SARS-CoV-2 neutralising or IgG antibody level (e.g. four-fold or greater rise in titre).

Probable and historical cases are currently included in the total number of cases reported by some jurisdictions, these are defined as per the COVID-19 national guidelines.

Probable and historical cases are currently included in the total number of cases reported by some jurisdictions, these are defined as per the COVID-19 national guidelines.

The method used to estimate the number of active cases varies by jurisdiction.

Find out more about the current situation in your state or territory:

Daily reported cases

Daily and cumulative number of reported COVID-19 cases in Australia

This graph shows the total number of new COVID-19 cases in Australia reported each day by states and territories and the cumulative number of confirmed COVID-19 cases reported over time. These figures are collated and updated by 9 pm AEST each day and reflect the previous 24 hours.

Expand description of Daily and cumulative number of reported COVID-19 cases in Australia

This bar chart shows the newly confirmed COVID-19 cases by notification received date.

The line graph shows the cumulative number of newly confirmed COVID-19 cases by notification received date.

The horizontal axis shows the date of notification to state and territory health departments.

The vertical axis on the left shows the number of new COVID-19 cases, represented by the bars.

The vertical axis on the right shows the cumulative number of COVID-19 cases, represented by the line.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 confirmed case is a person who:

  • tests positive to a validated specific SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test or
  • has the virus isolated in cell culture, with PCR confirmation using a validated method or
  • undergoes a seroconversion to or has a significant rise in SARS-CoV-2 neutralising or IgG antibody level (e.g. four-fold or greater rise in titre).

The first cases of COVID-19 in Australia were identified in late January 2020. Following a peak of cases at the end of March, low numbers of cases were reported each day until early-June 2020. From mid-June 2020, cases increased and peaked in early August 2020 and then declined. Since late-September 2020, a low number of new cases continue to be reported each day. 

Total COVID-19 cases in Australia by source of infection

Total COVID-19 cases in Australia by source of infection

This table shows the number of COVID-19 cases by source of infection for each state and territory, since the first case was reported. The table also shows the total number of cases and deaths by state and territory.

Expand description of Total COVID-19 cases in Australia by source of infection

This table shows the number of COVID-19 cases by source of infection for each state and territory, since the first case was reported. The table also shows the total number of cases and deaths by state and territory.

The source of infection for confirmed cases of COVID-19 can be described as:

  • overseas acquired – the person was infected while overseas (including at sea)
  • locally acquired – known contact – the person was infected in Australia through contact with someone confirmed to have COVID-19
  • locally acquired – unknown contact – the person was infected in Australia, but the source of infection is not known
  • locally acquired –interstate travel – the person was infected in Australia, but not in the reporting jurisdiction
  • under investigation – the source of infection has not yet been determined, but is currently being investigated through public health actions.

The majority of confirmed cases since late October have been overseas acquired.

The number of cases currently under investigation should ideally be as low as possible.

Knowing the source of infection assists in stopping the spread of COVID-19.

A COVID-19 death is defined for surveillance purposes as a death in a probable or confirmed COVID-19 case, unless there is a clear alternative cause of death that cannot be related to COVID19 (e.g. trauma). There should be no period of complete recovery from COVID-19 between illness and death. Where a Coroner’s report is available, these findings are to be observed.

Cases and deaths by age and sex

COVID-19 cases by age group and sex

This graph shows the number of COVID-19 cases for males and females by age group since the first case was reported.

Expand description of COVID-19 cases by age group and sex

This bar chart shows the number of COVID-19 cases for males and females by age group since the first confirmed cases were reported in late January 2020.

The horizontal axis shows the age breakdown in 10-year intervals from zero years old to greater than 90 years old.

The vertical axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 confirmed case is a person who:

  • tests positive to a validated specific SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test or
  • has the virus isolated in cell culture, with PCR confirmation using a validated method or
  • undergoes a seroconversion to or has a significant rise in SARS-CoV-2 neutralising or IgG antibody level (e.g. four-fold or greater rise in titre).

The proportion of COVID-19 cases in males and females is roughly equal, however the ratio does differ across the age groups presented.

Cases have been reported across all age groups. The majority of all cases are reported in those aged 20 to 59 years. The number of cases is highest in the 20–29 years age group.

Cases by age group and sex

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of COVID-19 cases for males and females by age group since the first case was reported.

Expand description of Cases by age group and sex

The data is shown in 3 columns:

  • age group ranges
  • male
  • female.

COVID-19 deaths by age group and sex

This graph shows the number of COVID-19 associated deaths in Australia for males and females by age group since the first case was reported.

Expand description of COVID-19 deaths by age group and sex

This bar chart shows the total number of COVID-19 associated deaths in Australia by age group and sex since the first confirmed cases were reported in late January 2020.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 death is defined for surveillance purposes as a death in a probable or confirmed COVID-19 case, unless there is a clear alternative cause of death that cannot be related to COVID19 (e.g. trauma). There should be no period of complete recovery from COVID-19 between illness and death. Where a Coroner’s report is available, these findings are to be observed.

Deaths have been reported in those aged in their 20s to their 100s. The majority of deaths have been reported in people aged 70 years and over.

The horizontal axis shows the age breakdown in 10-year intervals from zero years old to greater than 90 years old.

The vertical axis shows the number of confirmed COVID-19 deaths.

Deaths by age group and sex

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of COVID-19 associated deaths in Australia for males and females by age group since the first case was reported.

Expand description of Deaths by age group and sex

The data is shown in 3 columns:

  • age group ranges
  • male
  • female.

Tests conducted and results

COVID-19 tests conducted in total in the last 7 days and results

This table shows the number of COVID-19 tests conducted in total and in the last 7 days, the rate of tests in the last 7 days per 100,000 population and the percentage that returned a positive result by state and territory and in Australia, since the first case was reported.

Expand description of COVID-19 tests conducted in total in the last 7 days and results

This table shows the number of tests conducted in Australia and in each state and territory, since the first case was reported in late January 2020 in total and in the last 7 days. This number is not reflective of the number of people that have been tested, but the total number of tests conducted, as individuals may have been tested multiple times. The data are based on information reported by states and territories.

Tests in the last 7 days per 100,000 population represent the number of tests conducted by each state and territory in the last 7 days as a rate of the number of people in the jurisdiction.

The testing positivity rate is also displayed. This positivity rate represents the proportion of all tests that have returned a positive result for COVID-19.

To date, over 13 million tests have been conducted nationally. Of those tests conducted, less than 1% have been positive.

Cases admitted to hospital

Current COVID-19 cases in hospitals and Intensive Care Units (ICUs)

This graph shows the number of COVID-19 cases currently admitted to hospital, including cases in ICUs, in Australia and each state and territory.

Expand description of Current COVID-19 cases in hospitals and Intensive Care Units (ICUs)

This chart shows the number of COVID-19 cases currently in hospital, including cases in ICU, in Australia and each state and territory.

Each bar represents those in ICU and those not in ICU by state and territory.

The horizontal axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases currently hospitalised.

The vertical axis shows the Australian total and each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.

Cases admitted to hospital

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of COVID-19 cases currently admitted to hospital, including cases in ICUs, in Australia and each state and territory.

Expand description of Cases admitted to hospital

The data is shown in 3 columns:

  • jurisdiction – with Australia in total first, then each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.
  • the number of cases not in ICU
  • the number of cases in ICU.

Cases in National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) services

This table shows the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for NDIS participants and workers since March 2020*.

Source: NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission 18/10/2021

State

Participant Active

Worker Active

Participant Recovered

Worker Recovered

Participant Deaths

Worker Deaths

ACT

10

13

5

12

-

-

NSW

145

185

110

149

12

-

NT

-

-

-

-

-

-

QLD

-

-

-

-

-

-

SA

-

-

-

5

-

-

TAS

-

-

-

-

-

-

VIC

144

110

170

199

12

-

WA

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total

299

308

286

372

24

-

  • Note: Table does not show counts less than 5
  • * Only registered NDIS providers are required to notify the NDIS Commission for services regulated by the NDIS Commission. Therefore, these figures do not represent all NDIS participants or all people with disability (who may not be NDIS participants).

Cases in aged care services

COVID-19 cases in aged care services – residential care

This graph shows the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for people living in Australian Government–subsidised residential aged care facilities.

Expand description of COVID-19 cases in aged care services – residential care

This graph shows the number of confirmed cases, deaths and cases recovered since late January 2020 in those who receive Australian Government–subsidised residential care in each state and territory.

Residential care means people who live in an Australian Government–subsidised aged care facility.

Each bar represents the number of active cases, recovered cases and deaths.

The bottom axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases.

The vertical axis shows the Australian total and each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.

The majority of cases and deaths reported in residential care in Australia have occurred in Victoria.

Cases in aged care services – residential care

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for people living in Australian Government–subsidised residential aged care facilities.

Expand description of Cases in aged care services – residential care

The data is shown in 4 columns:

  • jurisdiction – with Australia in total first, then each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.
  • active cases
  • recovered cases
  • deaths.

COVID-19 outbreaks in Australian residential aged care facilities

Read the weekly report that provides a snapshot of data on the impact of COVID-19 in residential aged care facilities nationally.

The report includes data on the number of services impacted and number of staff and resident cases, as well as workforce, vaccine rollout, testing and PPE provided to affected services to support them.

COVID-19 cases in aged care services – in-home care

This graph shows the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for people receiving Australian Government–subsidised care in their own home.

Expand description of COVID-19 cases in aged care services – in-home care

The number of confirmed cases, deaths and cases recovered since late January 2020 in those who receive Australian Government–subsidised in-home care in Australia and in each state and territory.

In-home care means people who receive Australian Government subsidised care in their own home.

Each bar represents the number of active cases, recovered cases and deaths.

The bottom axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases.

The vertical axis shows the Australian total and each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.

The majority of cases reported in In-home care in Australia are in Victoria.

Cases in aged care services – in-home care

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for people receiving Australian Government–subsidised care in their own home.

Expand description of Cases in aged care services – in-home care

The data is shown in 4 columns:

  • jurisdiction – with Australia in total first, then each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.
  • active cases
  • recovered cases
  • deaths.

How Australia compares with the world

Learn more about the international situation from the World Health Organization (WHO). Read their weekly situation reports and check the WHO COVID-19 dashboard.

OECD Countries – COVID-19 Mortality in 2021

COVID-19 mortality data was extracted from Our World in Data on 15/09/2021, with data extracted for the period 01/01/2021 to 14/09/2021. Data is derived from open source reporting and is subject to revision. COVID-19 reporting is dependent on individual countries’ health reporting systems and may not be directly comparable. 

OECD country

Cumulative deaths 
(01/01/2021-15/09/2021)

Cumulative deaths per 100,000 population
(01/01/2021-15/09/2021)

Hungary

20,431

213.42

Slovakia

10,310

190.85

Czechia

18,703

175.62

Colombia

82,192

160.88

Poland

46,469

124.01

Mexico

141,462

109.14

Lithuania

2,874

108.37

Portugal

10,894

107.79

Chile

20,593

107.46

Latvia

1,969

105.95

United States

30,7970

93.15

Italy

55,334

92.43

Greece

9,342

90.49

United Kingdom

60,350

89.38

Slovenia

1,742

85.29

Estonia

1,079

81.80

France

51,354

76.20

Spain

34,556

73.92

Germany

58,549

70.21

Costa Rica

3,569

69.45

Sweden

5,976

58.82

Ireland

2,907

58.56

Luxembourg

339

53.40

Belgium

5,892

51.11

Austria

4,579

51.07

Israel

4,050

46.43

Turkey

39,024

46.14

Netherlands

6,833

40.37

Switzerland

3,019

35.50

Canada

11,483

30.28

Denmark

1,294

22.67

Japan

13,324

10.77

Finland

486

8.76

Norway

391

7.15

South Korea

1,425

2.83

Iceland

4

1.16

Australia

193

0.75

New Zealand

2

0.04

Last updated: 
18 October 2021

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