Coronavirus (COVID-19) case numbers and statistics

This page provides updates about the current situation, latest case numbers and related information. It is updated every day by 9 pm AEST and reflects the previous 24 hours.

We are managing the COVID-19 outbreak in Australia as a health emergency.  This page provides a number of visual representations of information about COVID-19 in Australia.

COVID-19 summary statistics

 

 

The above tiles show the:

  • number of locally acquired, overseas acquired and under investigation cases in the last 24 hours
  • current number of active cases, hospitalised cases and tests conducted in the last 24 hours. Note: the number of active cases is an estimate as states and territories differ in how they collect this data
  • total number of cases, deaths and tests.

Note: States and territories provide these figures daily. Due to the dynamic nature of case data, state and territory health departments may revise their daily numbers, where historic cases may be added or previously reported cases excluded after further investigation.

NSW locally acquired figures include those reported as locally acquired - investigation ongoing. ACT and Victoria cases reported as under investigation likely represent cases that are locally acquired, however their links to other cases are still under investigation.

Daily data on the status of Australia's COVID-19 vaccine rollout is now available. This includes a detailed infographic and breakdown of vaccine doses administered across Australia. See the latest data on Australia's vaccine rollout.

Dr Lucas De Toca, COVID-19 Primary Care Response First Assistant Secretary, answers the Top Three questions
11:00
Read transcript

Good morning, I am Dr Lucas De Toca and I lead the rollout of the vaccine through GPs, pharmacies and Aboriginal health services for the Australian Government. Today, I am joined by Linda who is doing Auslan interpreting, as always. Thank you, Linda, and we are going to be answering some of your most asked questions on our social media channels, including what is Ronapreve and how it works to prevent COVID-19 or to treat COVID-19, talking about anxiety when kids are returning to school, and also talking about the lead time is for a third dose if you are severely immunocompromised. As usual, we are on the land of the Ngunnawal people, so Dhawra nhuna, dhawra Ngunawal. Yanggu gulanyin ngalawiri, dhunayi, Ngunawal dhawra. Wanggarralijinyin mariny balan bugarabang, and also extending that acknowledgement to the Traditional Owners of the lands where you may be watching from. Today’s shout out is a massive shout out to everyone in Australia because we are passed 70% of the population 16 and over fully vaccinated. That's an amazing achievement, it has happened very quickly, and we want to thank you for it. It's really amazing that we have reached that milestone and it means that, as we are seeing in many states and territories, we’re going back to as normal as possible and returning to the activites and social options that we had before the pandemic. So keep it up, keep coming up for your second dose, and the more vaccinated we are, the more protected we will be as a society. To celebrate that achievement, the Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officer, Professor Alison McMillan, is going to start baking treats to celebrate that we have reached that milestone. And we are encouraging everyone to join Alison, Professor McMillan, in that activity. So why don't you bake your favourite treat for yourself, for your friends and family, and you can share it on social media with the hashtag #BakeForTheSweetLife as we celebrate that we are reaching this first milestone on a fully vaccinated Australia. Keep it up and let's see how soon we can celebrate 80% fully vaccinated for 16 and over.

 

For today's first question, you probably will have heard about the Government's purchasing agreement for one of the latest COVID-19 treatments, Ronapreve. What is Ronapreve? How is it used to treat COVID-19?

 

Ronapreve is what we generally call an antibody cocktail or an antibody combination, so it is actually a drug that is administered intravenously, so an IV infusion has to be administered in a healthcare setting, it is not an oral medication, that contains two antibodies: Casirivimab and Imdevimab. A lot of complex names, of course. ‘MAB’ at the end of those names means monoclonal antibody, so that is a bit of a handy know to, if a drug ends in ‘MAB’, it means that it is a monoclonal antibody. What the drug does is it injects into the person antibodies that can recognize different parts of the SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and attaches to the virus in two different places, because there are two different antibodies, so you can target two different areas of the virus and that signals to your body, ‘this is foreign, this is something you need to get rid of’. It reduces the infectivity if given early and, in some places, is being trialed to be used to treat contacts of positive cases and try to reduce their chances of a person getting infected. What these types of drugs do is essentially try to reproduce what would happen if you have already an immune response against the virus by providing you externally with the antibodies that can be used to treat the disease. However, these are not antibodies that are produced by your body so after a while, like any drug, they get eliminated from the organism and they don't cause any lasting immunity. So, still, the best thing you can do to make sure that you have the antibodies to protect yourself from COVID-19 is to get a vaccine so your body can actually generate its own antibodies to respond to the virus. Ronapreve, at the moment, is undergoing phase 3 clinical trials and we will keep monitoring how those go, and then the Therapeutic Goods Administration, our regulator for drugs in Australia, the TGA, will make a decision on whether that drug gets approved for use in our country and then it gets added to the toolbox of treatments that we have for COVID-19 including sotrovimab, that we spoke about in a different segment, or remdesivir. A bit like with other treatments like molnupiravir, what we are doing is purchasing in advance just in case and if they proves to be as effective and as safe as the early trials indicate and the TGA decides that we can use them in Australia, then we already have them purchased so we can make sure that people who need them, have them.

 

Today's second question is about returning to school.

 

We are seeing in many states and territories that after a very extended period of home schooling, face-to-face school learning is coming back and, understandably, many children are experiencing anxiety with the idea of going back to face-to-face learning after that time mostly at home, not dissimilar to the anxiety that many of us are feeling when we come back to the workplace after working from home and, of course, the parents that have concerns about their children going back to school. It's completely normal, and every child is different and parents have all of their very well-developed strategies to deal with these things. But I would recommend that you check out a very good resource on Beyond Blue's website called 'Managing Your Child's Transition Back to School.' I recommend a read, it's not a long article and it gives you a number of potentially useful tips. Again, it is not a rulebook and you know what works for your child, but it might give you ideas of how to shape or frame some of that thinking of very practical things like monitoring the requirements so you are up to speed with what is happening and what the requirements around your state and your school. Discuss things openly, matter-of-factly, having an open conversation with your child about what the situation is. Set up a routine. Routines, and that is not just for children, that is for everyone, routines can help settle some of those concerns and give us a sense of control. Use incentives and highlight the positives, you will be able to see your friends again, maybe organise play dates, if allowed according to public health restrictions, after school. Reinforce the positive elements of actually returning to school. Tell them that you are confident, instill that sense of confidence that this is a good thing that they can have and support them to make them feel better to be able to hang out with their friends face-to-face. Regularly check in, monitor how they are doing and keep having those conversations so if anything happens, you are maintaining across it. Pretty obvious things that I'm sure all of you are doing them and I'm not going to tell you how to suck eggs or deal with your kids, but there are some practical things that you may find useful. Ultimately, there are a lot of organisations that can help if you are worried about how your child is doing and you need a bit more help, which is completely fine and it is good that there is help out there. A few of those, the Kids Helpline has a phone number and online counselling for people aged 5 to 25 and you can find them on 1800 551 800. There is also Lifeline on 13 11 14. You can also call the Parentline in your state or territory for counselling and support. Their number varies from state and territory but you can google it and find what the relevant one is for your jurisdiction. You can also go to headspace.org.au to chat with someone online and also access many more resources. There is also SANE Australia for people living with a mental illness and their carers, and the phone number is 1800 187 263. And also you can reach out to a youth mental health service called Reach Out on reachout.com.

 

The final question for today is if I need a third dose because I am severely immunocompromised, what is the timing to get it?

 

My answers are always very long so I will just cut to the chase. The recommended interval for a third dose for immunocompromised people is between two and six months since you received your second dose. If you are in the list and the The Department of Health's website has a list of conditions and treatments that mean you may require a third dose in order to complete your primary course of vaccination for COVID-19. Talk to your health professional and if it has been at least two months since you had your second dose, organise an appointment for a third dose so you can complete your primary vaccination course. The current advice is that mRNA vaccines are preferred for that third dose, and that is either Pfizer (or Comirnaty) or Moderna (or Spikevax) vaccines. AstraZeneca can also be used for people who had a primary course with AstraZeneca and had no severe side effects. But at this stage for that third dose, the preferred vaccine is an mRNA one. As we said a couple of days ago, this is advice for a third dose for people who are severely immunocompromised, which is a small group of people. ATAGI, the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation, is still to provide advice on what, if any, the plans for an overall booster program for the general population and other at-risk groups will be. We will keep you informed as that changes.

 

That's all we have for today, thank you very much for joining us and submitting your questions. Thank you for your ongoing comments and thank you for staying COVIDSafe. Bake for Chief Nurse and Midwifery Officer Alison McMilan and make sure you use the hashtag #BakeForTheSweetLife. Thank you very much.

We are no longer displaying the ‘at a glance’ infographic on this page. Instead, you can view the daily infographics on the collection page.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) at a glance infographic collection

A collection of daily infographics providing a quick view of the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation in Australia each day since 5 April 2020.

Recently reported cases by state and territory and source of infection

Local, overseas acquired and under investigation cases by states and territories

This table shows the number of cases by source of infection in the last 24 hours and last 7 days as well as the number of active cases that have occurred in Australia.

Expand description of Local, overseas acquired and under investigation cases by states and territories

State and territory totals reflect where a person has been tested and public health management occurred, which may differ from their normal place of residence.

The majority of total confirmed cases and deaths are from Victoria.

The number of confirmed cases and deaths reported in each state and territory since the first case was reported in late January 2020. State and territory totals reflect where a person has been tested and public health management occurred, which may differ from their normal place of residence.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 confirmed case is a person who:

  • tests positive to a validated specific SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test or
  • has the virus isolated in cell culture, with PCR confirmation using a validated method or
  • undergoes a seroconversion to or has a significant rise in SARS-CoV-2 neutralising or IgG antibody level (e.g. four-fold or greater rise in titre).

Probable and historical cases are currently included in the total number of cases reported by some jurisdictions, these are defined as per the COVID-19 national guidelines.

Probable and historical cases are currently included in the total number of cases reported by some jurisdictions, these are defined as per the COVID-19 national guidelines.

The method used to estimate the number of active cases varies by jurisdiction.

Find out more about the current situation in your state or territory:

Daily reported cases

Daily and cumulative number of reported COVID-19 cases in Australia

This graph shows the total number of new COVID-19 cases in Australia reported each day by states and territories and the cumulative number of confirmed COVID-19 cases reported over time. These figures are collated and updated by 9 pm AEST each day and reflect the previous 24 hours.

Expand description of Daily and cumulative number of reported COVID-19 cases in Australia

This bar chart shows the newly confirmed COVID-19 cases by notification received date.

The line graph shows the cumulative number of newly confirmed COVID-19 cases by notification received date.

The horizontal axis shows the date of notification to state and territory health departments.

The vertical axis on the left shows the number of new COVID-19 cases, represented by the bars.

The vertical axis on the right shows the cumulative number of COVID-19 cases, represented by the line.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 confirmed case is a person who:

  • tests positive to a validated specific SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test or
  • has the virus isolated in cell culture, with PCR confirmation using a validated method or
  • undergoes a seroconversion to or has a significant rise in SARS-CoV-2 neutralising or IgG antibody level (e.g. four-fold or greater rise in titre).

The first cases of COVID-19 in Australia were identified in late January 2020. Following a peak of cases at the end of March, low numbers of cases were reported each day until early-June 2020. From mid-June 2020, cases increased and peaked in early August 2020 and then declined. Since late-September 2020, a low number of new cases continue to be reported each day. 

Total COVID-19 cases in Australia by source of infection

Total COVID-19 cases in Australia by source of infection

This table shows the number of COVID-19 cases by source of infection for each state and territory, since the first case was reported. The table also shows the total number of cases and deaths by state and territory.

Expand description of Total COVID-19 cases in Australia by source of infection

This table shows the number of COVID-19 cases by source of infection for each state and territory, since the first case was reported. The table also shows the total number of cases and deaths by state and territory.

The source of infection for confirmed cases of COVID-19 can be described as:

  • overseas acquired – the person was infected while overseas (including at sea)
  • locally acquired – known contact – the person was infected in Australia through contact with someone confirmed to have COVID-19
  • locally acquired – unknown contact – the person was infected in Australia, but the source of infection is not known
  • locally acquired –interstate travel – the person was infected in Australia, but not in the reporting jurisdiction
  • under investigation – the source of infection has not yet been determined, but is currently being investigated through public health actions.

The majority of confirmed cases since late October have been overseas acquired.

The number of cases currently under investigation should ideally be as low as possible.

Knowing the source of infection assists in stopping the spread of COVID-19.

A COVID-19 death is defined for surveillance purposes as a death in a probable or confirmed COVID-19 case, unless there is a clear alternative cause of death that cannot be related to COVID19 (e.g. trauma). There should be no period of complete recovery from COVID-19 between illness and death. Where a Coroner’s report is available, these findings are to be observed.

Cases and deaths by age and sex

COVID-19 cases by age group and sex

This graph shows the number of COVID-19 cases for males and females by age group since the first case was reported.

Expand description of COVID-19 cases by age group and sex

This bar chart shows the number of COVID-19 cases for males and females by age group since the first confirmed cases were reported in late January 2020.

The horizontal axis shows the age breakdown in 10-year intervals from zero years old to greater than 90 years old.

The vertical axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 confirmed case is a person who:

  • tests positive to a validated specific SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test or
  • has the virus isolated in cell culture, with PCR confirmation using a validated method or
  • undergoes a seroconversion to or has a significant rise in SARS-CoV-2 neutralising or IgG antibody level (e.g. four-fold or greater rise in titre).

The proportion of COVID-19 cases in males and females is roughly equal, however the ratio does differ across the age groups presented.

Cases have been reported across all age groups. The majority of all cases are reported in those aged 20 to 59 years. The number of cases is highest in the 20–29 years age group.

Cases by age group and sex

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of COVID-19 cases for males and females by age group since the first case was reported.

Expand description of Cases by age group and sex

The data is shown in 3 columns:

  • age group ranges
  • male
  • female.

COVID-19 deaths by age group and sex

This graph shows the number of COVID-19 associated deaths in Australia for males and females by age group since the first case was reported.

Expand description of COVID-19 deaths by age group and sex

This bar chart shows the total number of COVID-19 associated deaths in Australia by age group and sex since the first confirmed cases were reported in late January 2020.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 death is defined for surveillance purposes as a death in a probable or confirmed COVID-19 case, unless there is a clear alternative cause of death that cannot be related to COVID19 (e.g. trauma). There should be no period of complete recovery from COVID-19 between illness and death. Where a Coroner’s report is available, these findings are to be observed.

Deaths have been reported in those aged in their 20s to their 100s. The majority of deaths have been reported in people aged 70 years and over.

The horizontal axis shows the age breakdown in 10-year intervals from zero years old to greater than 90 years old.

The vertical axis shows the number of confirmed COVID-19 deaths.

Deaths by age group and sex

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of COVID-19 associated deaths in Australia for males and females by age group since the first case was reported.

Expand description of Deaths by age group and sex

The data is shown in 3 columns:

  • age group ranges
  • male
  • female.

Tests conducted and results

COVID-19 tests conducted in total in the last 7 days and results

This table shows the number of COVID-19 tests conducted in total and in the last 7 days, the rate of tests in the last 7 days per 100,000 population and the percentage that returned a positive result by state and territory and in Australia, since the first case was reported.

Expand description of COVID-19 tests conducted in total in the last 7 days and results

This table shows the number of tests conducted in Australia and in each state and territory, since the first case was reported in late January 2020 in total and in the last 7 days. This number is not reflective of the number of people that have been tested, but the total number of tests conducted, as individuals may have been tested multiple times. The data are based on information reported by states and territories.

Tests in the last 7 days per 100,000 population represent the number of tests conducted by each state and territory in the last 7 days as a rate of the number of people in the jurisdiction.

The testing positivity rate is also displayed. This positivity rate represents the proportion of all tests that have returned a positive result for COVID-19.

To date, over 13 million tests have been conducted nationally. Of those tests conducted, less than 1% have been positive.

Cases admitted to hospital

Current COVID-19 cases in hospitals and Intensive Care Units (ICUs)

This graph shows the number of COVID-19 cases currently admitted to hospital, including cases in ICUs, in Australia and each state and territory.

Expand description of Current COVID-19 cases in hospitals and Intensive Care Units (ICUs)

This chart shows the number of COVID-19 cases currently in hospital, including cases in ICU, in Australia and each state and territory.

Each bar represents those in ICU and those not in ICU by state and territory.

The horizontal axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases currently hospitalised.

The vertical axis shows the Australian total and each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.

Cases admitted to hospital

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of COVID-19 cases currently admitted to hospital, including cases in ICUs, in Australia and each state and territory.

Expand description of Cases admitted to hospital

The data is shown in 3 columns:

  • jurisdiction – with Australia in total first, then each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.
  • the number of cases not in ICU
  • the number of cases in ICU.

Cases in National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) services

This table shows the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for NDIS participants and workers since March 2020*.

Source: NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission 21/10/2021

State

Participant Active

Worker Active

Participant Recovered

Worker Recovered

Participant Deaths

Worker Deaths

ACT

10

13

5

12

-

-

NSW

151

196

110

149

12

-

NT

-

-

-

-

-

-

QLD

-

-

-

-

-

-

SA

-

-

-

5

-

-

TAS

-

-

-

-

-

-

VIC

201

142

170

199

14

-

WA

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total

362

351

286

372

26

-

  • Note: Table does not show counts less than 5
  • * Only registered NDIS providers are required to notify the NDIS Commission for services regulated by the NDIS Commission. Therefore, these figures do not represent all NDIS participants or all people with disability (who may not be NDIS participants).

Cases in aged care services

COVID-19 cases in aged care services – residential care

This graph shows the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for people living in Australian Government–subsidised residential aged care facilities.

Expand description of COVID-19 cases in aged care services – residential care

This graph shows the number of confirmed cases, deaths and cases recovered since late January 2020 in those who receive Australian Government–subsidised residential care in each state and territory.

Residential care means people who live in an Australian Government–subsidised aged care facility.

Each bar represents the number of active cases, recovered cases and deaths.

The bottom axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases.

The vertical axis shows the Australian total and each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.

The majority of cases and deaths reported in residential care in Australia have occurred in Victoria.

Cases in aged care services – residential care

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for people living in Australian Government–subsidised residential aged care facilities.

Expand description of Cases in aged care services – residential care

The data is shown in 4 columns:

  • jurisdiction – with Australia in total first, then each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.
  • active cases
  • recovered cases
  • deaths.

COVID-19 outbreaks in Australian residential aged care facilities

Read the weekly report that provides a snapshot of data on the impact of COVID-19 in residential aged care facilities nationally.

The report includes data on the number of services impacted and number of staff and resident cases, as well as workforce, vaccine rollout, testing and PPE provided to affected services to support them.

COVID-19 cases in aged care services – in-home care

This graph shows the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for people receiving Australian Government–subsidised care in their own home.

Expand description of COVID-19 cases in aged care services – in-home care

The number of confirmed cases, deaths and cases recovered since late January 2020 in those who receive Australian Government–subsidised in-home care in Australia and in each state and territory.

In-home care means people who receive Australian Government subsidised care in their own home.

Each bar represents the number of active cases, recovered cases and deaths.

The bottom axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases.

The vertical axis shows the Australian total and each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.

The majority of cases reported in In-home care in Australia are in Victoria.

Cases in aged care services – in-home care

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for people receiving Australian Government–subsidised care in their own home.

Expand description of Cases in aged care services – in-home care

The data is shown in 4 columns:

  • jurisdiction – with Australia in total first, then each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.
  • active cases
  • recovered cases
  • deaths.

How Australia compares with the world

Learn more about the international situation from the World Health Organization (WHO). Read their weekly situation reports and check the WHO COVID-19 dashboard.

OECD Countries – COVID-19 Mortality in 2021

COVID-19 mortality data was extracted from Our World in Data on 15/09/2021, with data extracted for the period 01/01/2021 to 14/09/2021. Data is derived from open source reporting and is subject to revision. COVID-19 reporting is dependent on individual countries’ health reporting systems and may not be directly comparable. 

OECD country

Cumulative deaths 
(01/01/2021-15/09/2021)

Cumulative deaths per 100,000 population
(01/01/2021-15/09/2021)

Hungary

20,431

213.42

Slovakia

10,310

190.85

Czechia

18,703

175.62

Colombia

82,192

160.88

Poland

46,469

124.01

Mexico

141,462

109.14

Lithuania

2,874

108.37

Portugal

10,894

107.79

Chile

20,593

107.46

Latvia

1,969

105.95

United States

30,7970

93.15

Italy

55,334

92.43

Greece

9,342

90.49

United Kingdom

60,350

89.38

Slovenia

1,742

85.29

Estonia

1,079

81.80

France

51,354

76.20

Spain

34,556

73.92

Germany

58,549

70.21

Costa Rica

3,569

69.45

Sweden

5,976

58.82

Ireland

2,907

58.56

Luxembourg

339

53.40

Belgium

5,892

51.11

Austria

4,579

51.07

Israel

4,050

46.43

Turkey

39,024

46.14

Netherlands

6,833

40.37

Switzerland

3,019

35.50

Canada

11,483

30.28

Denmark

1,294

22.67

Japan

13,324

10.77

Finland

486

8.76

Norway

391

7.15

South Korea

1,425

2.83

Iceland

4

1.16

Australia

193

0.75

New Zealand

2

0.04

Last updated: 
22 October 2021

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