Coronavirus (COVID-19) case numbers and statistics

This page provides updates about the current situation, latest case numbers and related information. It is updated every day by 9 pm AEST and reflects the previous 24 hours.

We are managing the COVID-19 outbreak in Australia as a health emergency.  This page provides a number of visual representations of information about COVID-19 in Australia.

COVID-19 summary statistics

 

 

The above tiles show the:

  • number of locally acquired, overseas acquired and under investigation cases in the last 24 hours
  • current number of active cases, hospitalised cases and tests conducted in the last 24 hours. Note: the number of active cases is an estimate as states and territories differ in how they collect this data
  • total number of cases, deaths and tests.

Note: States and territories provide these figures daily. Due to the dynamic nature of case data, state and territory health departments may revise their daily numbers, where historic cases may be added or previously reported cases excluded after further investigation.

NSW locally acquired figures include those reported as locally acquired - investigation ongoing. ACT and Victoria cases reported as under investigation likely represent cases that are locally acquired, however their links to other cases are still under investigation.

Daily data on the status of Australia's COVID-19 vaccine rollout is now available. This includes a detailed infographic and breakdown of vaccine doses administered across Australia. See the latest data on Australia's vaccine rollout.

Top 3 COVID-19 vaccine questions – Omicron worries, border restrictions, and COVIDSafe and Omicron
9:20
Read transcript

Good day, everyone. My name is Steph Davis and I am a Deputy Chief Medical Officer at the Australian Government Department of Health. I am here to answer your top 3 questions today. Now, before we go any further, I would just like to pay my respects to the traditional owners of the country on which I am sitting today, it’s the Ngunnawal people. I'd like to extend those respects to the traditional custodians of the countries of which other people are sitting on today. I extend my respects to all elder’s past and present and emerging who may be joining us on this call. I extend those respects to any Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who may be viewing this video. Before I go any further from that I would like to do my shout out for today.  

My shout out is to all the scientists and the other people working in laboratories across our country.  You guys have done an amazing job since the beginning of the pandemic. Scaling up laboratory capacity doing enormous numbers of tests and you continue to do so with the emergence of this new variant. I want to say thank you so much, it's been an enormously important part of our response and thank you so much.

My first question today is about the Omicron variant, and the question is what does Omicron mean to Australia and how worried should I be? Before I answer this, I would just like to take a step back and talk about what the Omicron variant is. The Omicron variant was designated a variant of concern by the World Health Organisation on the 26 November, so just last week. I'm putting this date there because I want to point out that it is really early days at the moment. What is a variant of concern? A variant is just essentially a slightly different version of the COVID-19 virus. It is when the DNA or the genetic make-up of the virus changes a bit to look a bit different. It can be a variant of interest or a variant of concern and that really depends on how it is designated. Depending on what those changes in the genetic makeup look like. I just want to point out that it’s not unexpected that we get new variants of the COVID-19 virus. All viruses mutate and we know that viruses which are newer tend to mutate more quickly. We have seen a number of previous variants of the COVID-19 virus including Alpha, Beta and Delta. You will probably see a bit of a theme there if you haven't realised already, they are all named after letters of the Greek alphabet. Back to what makes this a variant of concern. It is basically about what those changes in the genetic make-up of the virus look like. Some of these changes indicate that this variant, this Omicron variant, might be a bit different to previous ones and it might have some slightly different epidemiological characteristics. The problem is because it is so early, we don't really know how differently this is going to behave in the population. We can make a bit of a guess from the DNA, but we don't know because it is too early to tell. We don't really know if it is going to be more transmissible than the Delta variant which is the one circulating in most of the world at the moment. We don't know if it is going to have a different level of disease severity and we don't know if it will have a different level or be affected differently by the vaccine. Again, this is because it is really early days. Obviously, this is all a bit concerning and that is why there is work going into this at the moment to try to understand it better. I do want to reassure you Australia is in a really good position to manage this and there are a few reasons for that. One is because as a population we have been outstanding with getting our vaccines, 87% of Australians aged 16 and over are double vaccinated which is incredibly high compared with most of the world. While we are not entirely sure how the vaccine will work against this variant. We are pretty sure it is going to have some level of ongoing effectiveness. Again, that puts us in a really good position. The other thing that puts us in a good position is our labs, we have excellent labs. I mentioned in my shout-out at the beginning of this, but our labs are fantastic, and they have picked up cases of this variant. It travels incredibly quickly, and they will continue to pick up cases. Which enables contract tracing to be done around those cases and try and control spread as much as possible. Again, another thing we have in our favour is contact tracing. We have excellent public health services who do a really great job around contact tracing. I think the final thing we have going in our favour is that we are 20 months into this pandemic or maybe 21 months now. We know what to do, we know how to do our COVIDSafe behaviours. We have been here before and we have learnt a lot. So, in terms of how worried we should be, I think we should probably be alert. We know there is a lot of work going on to try and understand this variant, but I don't think at this stage we should be alarmed. Finally, we can't give one of these without giving a shout out to getting your vaccine. Like I said, there's likely to be at least some level of effectiveness of the vaccine against this variant. Therefore, if you haven't had your vaccine yet, please book your appointment for today. If you are more than six months down the track from your second dose of vaccine, that means you are eligible for a booster, so think about going out and getting that booster.

My next question is also about the Omicron variant and that is, why has the government introduced border restrictions to some countries? This is really about buying us some time while we learn more about the variant. So, we know that the variant is circulating in high levels in some countries. We know it has been picked up in South Africa. Cases have been picked up in travellers from countries in southern Africa. In a number of different countries around the world.  Indicating that variant is probably circulating in those countries as well. In response to this and again this comes back to buying us some time. The government has put in some border restrictions around people travelling from a number of countries in southern Africa to try and slow down the introduction of the variant into Australia while we learn more about it and plan our response from here on. So, those border restrictions have been implemented on the advice of the Chief Medical Officer, Professor Paul Kelly. They concern a number of countries in southern Africa which are listed on the Department of Health website. What they basically say is if you have been in one of those countries in the past 14 days, you cannot come into Australia at the moment. If you are an Australian citizen or a permanent resident or a family member and you do need to come into Australia, then you are able to, but you need to undertake 14 days of quarantine on arrival. If you have arrived say in the last week before these border restrictions were implemented. Before we knew about the Omicron variant. But you were in one of these countries, then you need to go into quarantine until 14 days have passed since you have left one of these countries. So, these are going to be reviewed on an ongoing basis, these kind of border restrictions, and there is a lot of people looking at this and trying to learn about more about this variant as time goes on. The Australian Health Principals Protection Committee are meeting daily to discuss this. As our groups are looking at laboratory aspects of the variant and a whole of other groups around Australia and also around the world. I suspect we are going to learn a lot more about this variant and how we are going manage it moving forward over the coming weeks.

So, my third question today is, what COVIDSafe behaviours do we need for the Omicron variant? I suppose I have some good news for this. It is the same COVIDSafe behaviours we have been using since March 2020. So, I think we all know this of my heart by now, washing our hands, seizing into our elbows. If you have a symptom, go and get tested. If you have symptoms, don't go to work, don't go out, stay home so you don't infect other people. All the things that we know, and we have got so good at doing over the past 21 months, are still going to stand us in good stead for this variant. I think that is about it. Like I said, we are going to know a lot more over the coming weeks and it is really important that we continue to try and get our information as much as possible from reputable sites. In any kind of thing where we are learning a lot at the beginning and where maybe not much is known, there is always people willing to jump in and fill the gaps with information that may not be accurate. I really urge you to go on trusted sites like the Department of Health website, and other trusted sites to make sure you are getting your information from the right place.

So, think that is it now. Just before I sign off, I would like to thank my interpreters today, Ramas and Rebecca. Thank you so much, and thank you, everyone, for joining us and we will see you in a couple of weeks. Goodbye.

We are no longer displaying the ‘at a glance’ infographic on this page. Instead, you can view the daily infographics on the collection page.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) at a glance infographic collection

A collection of daily infographics providing a quick view of the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation in Australia each day since 5 April 2020.

Recently reported cases by state and territory and source of infection

Local, overseas acquired and under investigation cases by states and territories

This table shows the number of cases by source of infection in the last 24 hours and last 7 days as well as the number of active cases that have occurred in Australia.

Expand description of Local, overseas acquired and under investigation cases by states and territories

State and territory totals reflect where a person has been tested and public health management occurred, which may differ from their normal place of residence.

The majority of total confirmed cases and deaths are from Victoria.

The number of confirmed cases and deaths reported in each state and territory since the first case was reported in late January 2020. State and territory totals reflect where a person has been tested and public health management occurred, which may differ from their normal place of residence.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 confirmed case is a person who:

  • tests positive to a validated specific SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test or
  • has the virus isolated in cell culture, with PCR confirmation using a validated method or
  • undergoes a seroconversion to or has a significant rise in SARS-CoV-2 neutralising or IgG antibody level (e.g. four-fold or greater rise in titre).

Probable and historical cases are currently included in the total number of cases reported by some jurisdictions, these are defined as per the COVID-19 national guidelines.

Probable and historical cases are currently included in the total number of cases reported by some jurisdictions, these are defined as per the COVID-19 national guidelines.

The method used to estimate the number of active cases varies by jurisdiction.

Find out more about the current situation in your state or territory:

Daily reported cases

Daily and cumulative number of reported COVID-19 cases in Australia

This graph shows the total number of new COVID-19 cases in Australia reported each day by states and territories and the cumulative number of confirmed COVID-19 cases reported over time. These figures are collated and updated by 9 pm AEST each day and reflect the previous 24 hours.

Expand description of Daily and cumulative number of reported COVID-19 cases in Australia

This bar chart shows the newly confirmed COVID-19 cases by notification received date.

The line graph shows the cumulative number of newly confirmed COVID-19 cases by notification received date.

The horizontal axis shows the date of notification to state and territory health departments.

The vertical axis on the left shows the number of new COVID-19 cases, represented by the bars.

The vertical axis on the right shows the cumulative number of COVID-19 cases, represented by the line.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 confirmed case is a person who:

  • tests positive to a validated specific SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test or
  • has the virus isolated in cell culture, with PCR confirmation using a validated method or
  • undergoes a seroconversion to or has a significant rise in SARS-CoV-2 neutralising or IgG antibody level (e.g. four-fold or greater rise in titre).

The first cases of COVID-19 in Australia were identified in late January 2020. Following a peak of cases at the end of March, low numbers of cases were reported each day until early-June 2020. From mid-June 2020, cases increased and peaked in early August 2020 and then declined. Since late-September 2020, a low number of new cases continue to be reported each day. 

Total COVID-19 cases in Australia by source of infection

Total COVID-19 cases in Australia by source of infection

This table shows the number of COVID-19 cases by source of infection for each state and territory, since the first case was reported. The table also shows the total number of cases and deaths by state and territory.

Expand description of Total COVID-19 cases in Australia by source of infection

This table shows the number of COVID-19 cases by source of infection for each state and territory, since the first case was reported. The table also shows the total number of cases and deaths by state and territory.

The source of infection for confirmed cases of COVID-19 can be described as:

  • overseas acquired – the person was infected while overseas (including at sea)
  • locally acquired – known contact – the person was infected in Australia through contact with someone confirmed to have COVID-19
  • locally acquired – unknown contact – the person was infected in Australia, but the source of infection is not known
  • locally acquired –interstate travel – the person was infected in Australia, but not in the reporting jurisdiction
  • under investigation – the source of infection has not yet been determined, but is currently being investigated through public health actions.

The majority of confirmed cases since late October have been overseas acquired.

The number of cases currently under investigation should ideally be as low as possible.

Knowing the source of infection assists in stopping the spread of COVID-19.

A COVID-19 death is defined for surveillance purposes as a death in a probable or confirmed COVID-19 case, unless there is a clear alternative cause of death that cannot be related to COVID19 (e.g. trauma). There should be no period of complete recovery from COVID-19 between illness and death. Where a Coroner’s report is available, these findings are to be observed.

Cases and deaths by age and sex

COVID-19 cases by age group and sex

This graph shows the number of COVID-19 cases for males and females by age group since the first case was reported.

Expand description of COVID-19 cases by age group and sex

This bar chart shows the number of COVID-19 cases for males and females by age group since the first confirmed cases were reported in late January 2020.

The horizontal axis shows the age breakdown in 10-year intervals from zero years old to greater than 90 years old.

The vertical axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 confirmed case is a person who:

  • tests positive to a validated specific SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid test or
  • has the virus isolated in cell culture, with PCR confirmation using a validated method or
  • undergoes a seroconversion to or has a significant rise in SARS-CoV-2 neutralising or IgG antibody level (e.g. four-fold or greater rise in titre).

The proportion of COVID-19 cases in males and females is roughly equal, however the ratio does differ across the age groups presented.

Cases have been reported across all age groups. The majority of all cases are reported in those aged 20 to 59 years. The number of cases is highest in the 20–29 years age group.

Cases by age group and sex

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of COVID-19 cases for males and females by age group since the first case was reported.

Expand description of Cases by age group and sex

The data is shown in 3 columns:

  • age group ranges
  • male
  • female.

COVID-19 deaths by age group and sex

This graph shows the number of COVID-19 associated deaths in Australia for males and females by age group since the first case was reported.

Expand description of COVID-19 deaths by age group and sex

This bar chart shows the total number of COVID-19 associated deaths in Australia by age group and sex since the first confirmed cases were reported in late January 2020.

As per the COVID-19 national guidelines, a COVID-19 death is defined for surveillance purposes as a death in a probable or confirmed COVID-19 case, unless there is a clear alternative cause of death that cannot be related to COVID19 (e.g. trauma). There should be no period of complete recovery from COVID-19 between illness and death. Where a Coroner’s report is available, these findings are to be observed.

Deaths have been reported in those aged in their 20s to their 100s. The majority of deaths have been reported in people aged 70 years and over.

The horizontal axis shows the age breakdown in 10-year intervals from zero years old to greater than 90 years old.

The vertical axis shows the number of confirmed COVID-19 deaths.

Deaths by age group and sex

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of COVID-19 associated deaths in Australia for males and females by age group since the first case was reported.

Expand description of Deaths by age group and sex

The data is shown in 3 columns:

  • age group ranges
  • male
  • female.

Tests conducted and results

COVID-19 tests conducted in total in the last 7 days and results

This table shows the number of COVID-19 tests conducted in total and in the last 7 days, the rate of tests in the last 7 days per 100,000 population and the percentage that returned a positive result by state and territory and in Australia, since the first case was reported.

Expand description of COVID-19 tests conducted in total in the last 7 days and results

This table shows the number of tests conducted in Australia and in each state and territory, since the first case was reported in late January 2020 in total and in the last 7 days. This number is not reflective of the number of people that have been tested, but the total number of tests conducted, as individuals may have been tested multiple times. The data are based on information reported by states and territories.

Tests in the last 7 days per 100,000 population represent the number of tests conducted by each state and territory in the last 7 days as a rate of the number of people in the jurisdiction.

The testing positivity rate is also displayed. This positivity rate represents the proportion of all tests that have returned a positive result for COVID-19.

To date, over 13 million tests have been conducted nationally. Of those tests conducted, less than 1% have been positive.

Cases admitted to hospital

Current COVID-19 cases in hospitals and Intensive Care Units (ICUs)

This graph shows the number of COVID-19 cases currently admitted to hospital, including cases in ICUs, in Australia and each state and territory.

Expand description of Current COVID-19 cases in hospitals and Intensive Care Units (ICUs)

This chart shows the number of COVID-19 cases currently in hospital, including cases in ICU, in Australia and each state and territory.

Each bar represents those in ICU and those not in ICU by state and territory.

The horizontal axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases currently hospitalised.

The vertical axis shows the Australian total and each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.

Cases admitted to hospital

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of COVID-19 cases currently admitted to hospital, including cases in ICUs, in Australia and each state and territory.

Expand description of Cases admitted to hospital

The data is shown in 3 columns:

  • jurisdiction – with Australia in total first, then each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.
  • the number of cases not in ICU
  • the number of cases in ICU.

Cases in National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) services

This table shows the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for NDIS participants and workers since March 2020*.

Source: NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission 03/12/2021.

State

Participant Active

Worker Active

Participant Recovered

Worker Recovered

Participant Deaths

Worker Deaths

ACT

-

-

17

28

-

-

NSW

-

12

283

376

13

-

NT

-

-

-

-

-

-

QLD

-

-

-

-

-

-

SA

-

-

-

5

-

-

TAS

-

-

-

-

-

-

VIC

67

26 581 567

15

-

WA

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total

69

39 882 983

28

-

  • Note: Table does not show counts less than 5
  • *Only registered NDIS providers are required to notify the NDIS Commission for services regulated by the NDIS Commission. Therefore, these figures do not represent all NDIS participants or all people with disability (who may not be NDIS participants).

Cases in aged care services

COVID-19 cases in aged care services – residential care

This graph shows the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for people living in Australian Government–subsidised residential aged care facilities.

Expand description of COVID-19 cases in aged care services – residential care

This graph shows the number of confirmed cases, deaths and cases recovered since late January 2020 in those who receive Australian Government–subsidised residential care in each state and territory.

Residential care means people who live in an Australian Government–subsidised aged care facility.

Each bar represents the number of active cases, recovered cases and deaths.

The bottom axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases.

The vertical axis shows the Australian total and each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.

The majority of cases and deaths reported in residential care in Australia have occurred in Victoria.

Cases in aged care services – residential care

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for people living in Australian Government–subsidised residential aged care facilities.

Expand description of Cases in aged care services – residential care

The data is shown in 4 columns:

  • jurisdiction – with Australia in total first, then each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.
  • active cases
  • recovered cases
  • deaths.

COVID-19 outbreaks in Australian residential aged care facilities

Read the weekly report that provides a snapshot of data on the impact of COVID-19 in residential aged care facilities nationally.

The report includes data on the number of services impacted and number of staff and resident cases, as well as workforce, vaccine rollout, testing and PPE provided to affected services to support them.

COVID-19 cases in aged care services – in-home care

This graph shows the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for people receiving Australian Government–subsidised care in their own home.

Expand description of COVID-19 cases in aged care services – in-home care

The number of confirmed cases, deaths and cases recovered since late January 2020 in those who receive Australian Government–subsidised in-home care in Australia and in each state and territory.

In-home care means people who receive Australian Government subsidised care in their own home.

Each bar represents the number of active cases, recovered cases and deaths.

The bottom axis shows the number of COVID-19 cases.

The vertical axis shows the Australian total and each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.

The majority of cases reported in In-home care in Australia are in Victoria.

Cases in aged care services – in-home care

This table shows the same information as the matching graph: the number of confirmed active COVID-19 cases, deaths and recovered cases, in Australia and each state and territory, for people receiving Australian Government–subsidised care in their own home.

Expand description of Cases in aged care services – in-home care

The data is shown in 4 columns:

  • jurisdiction – with Australia in total first, then each state and territory: ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC and WA.
  • active cases
  • recovered cases
  • deaths.

How Australia compares with the world

Learn more about the international situation from the World Health Organization (WHO). Read their weekly situation reports and check the WHO COVID-19 dashboard.

OECD Countries – COVID-19 Mortality in 2021

COVID-19 mortality data was extracted from Our World in Data on 15/09/2021, with data extracted for the period 01/01/2021 to 14/09/2021. Data is derived from open source reporting and is subject to revision. COVID-19 reporting is dependent on individual countries’ health reporting systems and may not be directly comparable. 

OECD country

Cumulative deaths 
(01/01/2021-15/09/2021)

Cumulative deaths per 100,000 population
(01/01/2021-15/09/2021)

Hungary

20,431

213.42

Slovakia

10,310

190.85

Czechia

18,703

175.62

Colombia

82,192

160.88

Poland

46,469

124.01

Mexico

141,462

109.14

Lithuania

2,874

108.37

Portugal

10,894

107.79

Chile

20,593

107.46

Latvia

1,969

105.95

United States

307,970

93.15

Italy

55,334

92.43

Greece

9,342

90.49

United Kingdom

60,350

89.38

Slovenia

1,742

85.29

Estonia

1,079

81.80

France

51,354

76.20

Spain

34,556

73.92

Germany

58,549

70.21

Costa Rica

3,569

69.45

Sweden

5,976

58.82

Ireland

2,907

58.56

Luxembourg

339

53.40

Belgium

5,892

51.11

Austria

4,579

51.07

Israel

4,050

46.43

Turkey

39,024

46.14

Netherlands

6,833

40.37

Switzerland

3,019

35.50

Canada

11,483

30.28

Denmark

1,294

22.67

Japan

13,324

10.77

Finland

486

8.76

Norway

391

7.15

South Korea

1,425

2.83

Iceland

4

1.16

Australia

193

0.75

New Zealand

2

0.04

Last updated: 
3 December 2021

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