Tell your story this Women's Health Week

This Women’s Health Week, the Australian Government is urging women to share their experiences of bias in the health system through the first public consultation of its kind in Australia.

The Hon Ged Kearney MP
Assistant Minister for Health and Aged Care

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This Women’s Health Week, the Albanese Labor Government is urging women to share their experiences of bias in the health system through the first public consultation of its kind in Australia. 

People from communities who often experience additional challenges are encouraged to participate, including First Nations people, people from culturally and linguistically diverse communities, LGBTIQ people, people from regional and remote communities, and people with a disability.  

Anyone can take part, including patients, health providers, researchers and other stakeholders. Responses can be anonymous and submitted through an audio or video recording or written responses in the survey. 

All options can be completed in 17 different languages, and culturally and linguistically diverse people are encouraged to tell their story in their own language. 

Already, more than 1,500 people have submitted to the online portal. 



From delayed diagnosis, over medicating, dismissal of pain or other symptoms, or a lack of research and evidence used to treat women, there are many unique challenges faced by women in the health system. 

The results of the survey will help the National Women’s Health Advisory Council develop recommendations to reduce gender bias in health care and improve health outcomes for women and girls in Australia. 

  

To participate go to the online portal before Friday 13 October 2023: www.health.gov.au/womens-health-advisory-council

Attributable to Assistant Minister for Health and Aged Care Ged Kearney MP 

“What I have heard countless times is that every woman has a story – but nobody has ever asked them to tell it.  

“We know that often these experiences in the health system can be sensitive and difficult to share, so being able to participate in their own language can be really helpful for people. 

“I want to thank everyone who has taken the time to share their experiences, and I urge anyone who has faced or witnessed gender bias in the health system to tell us about it. 

“We can’t fix what we don’t know, and this Australia-first public consultation is an important step in understanding the issue and how best to address it.” 

 

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