National Framework for Universal Child and Family Health Services

3.5 Principles

Page last updated: 20 May 2013

Access

  • Services are universally available, are free and are appropriate, and accessible for all children and families and articulate where possible with other children’s services
  • Services are delivered flexibly how and where the family needs these. Some families will need help to access services
Equity
  • Services seek to improve the health of the whole population as well as reducing inequalities between population groups.
  • Universal services work with appropriate targeted responses directed to the families that need them most.
  • Service design and delivery is innovative and is informed by and is responsive to the social determinants of health, paying particular attention to the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, families and communities.
  • Services actively ameliorate the poorer health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, families and communities.
A focus on promotion and prevention
  • The primacy of health promotion, prevention and early intervention is recognised in service delivery.
Working in partnership with families
  • Services work in partnership with families, developing an ongoing relationship with parents focusing on strengths and capacity building.
  • The central role and expertise of families in influencing and supporting the health, wellbeing and development of children is recognised and parents are enabled and strengthened in this role.
  • Families and communities participate in service design and delivery.
Diversity
  • The diversity of Australian families and communities is valued and services are sensitive and responsive to family cultural, ethnic and socio-economic diversity.
Collaboration and continuity
  • Universal child and family health services work in partnership with primary, secondary and tertiary health services and the education, welfare and disability sectors to provide coordinated, multidisciplinary care and integrated service delivery.
  • Continuity of care at transition points is ‘seamless’.
  • Services maximise opportunities for families to develop sustained relationships with health, education, welfare and disability service providers.
Evidence based
  • Services actively ameliorate the poorer health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, families and communities.
  • Services reflect the best evidence or harness practice wisdom where evidence is not available.
  • Continuous improvement and evaluation of services promotes better outcomes for children and families.