Temporary resident doctors

This page answers questions on the operation of ROCS from the viewpoint of doctors.

Page last updated: 04 April 2018

  1. If I am a temporary resident doctor, am I eligible for ROCS?
  2. If I am a temporary resident doctor holding a 422, 457 or from 18 March 2018, a temporary visa, and I leave Australia temporarily (intending to return), am I eligible for ROCS?
  3. Are doctors working under other visa classes eligible for ROCS after leaving Australia permanently?
  4. If I am a temporary resident doctor and stay in Australia on holidays after I cease private medical practice, am I eligible for ROCS?
  5. If I am an eligible temporary resident doctor, do I need to have a ROCS contract before I leave Australia?

1. If I am a temporary resident doctor, am I eligible for ROCS?

To be eligible for ROCS, an overseas trained doctor must have:
  • worked in private medical practice in Australia on a subclass 422 (Medical Practitioner) or 457 (business (long stay)) visa or, from 18 March 2018, a temporary visa;
    • the visa must have permitted the holder to work in Australia and not prohibit the holder from engaging in medical practice in Australia; and
  • have permanently ceased medical practice in Australia; and
  • no longer reside in Australia.
Information about the Temporary Resident visa is at Department of Home Affairs website:
Temporary Skill Shortage visa (subclass 482) and Australia's skilled visas

2. If I am a temporary resident doctor holding a 422, 457 visa or from 18 March 2018, a temporary visa, and I leave Australia temporarily (intending to return), am I eligible for ROCS?

Temporary resident doctors are not eligible for the ROCS until they either cease to reside in Australia (or otherwise become eligible, for example, by going on maternity leave).

3. Are doctors working under other visa classes eligible for ROCS after leaving Australia permanently?

Yes, other temporary resident doctors are eligible on the usual conditions but they will not be eligible immediately on leaving Australia, unless they held a visa subclass 422, 457 or from 18 March 2018, a temporary visa that:
  • permitted the holder to work in Australia; and
  • did not prohibit the holder from engaging in medical practice in Australia.
These doctors may choose to make their own run-off cover arrangements with a medical indemnity insurer in the interim.

4. If I am a temporary resident doctor and stay in Australia on holidays after I cease private medical practice, am I eligible for ROCS?

Temporary resident doctors are not eligible for the ROCS until they either cease to reside in Australia (or otherwise become eligible, for example, by going on maternity leave).

5. If I am an eligible temporary resident doctor, do I need to have a ROCS contract before I leave Australia?

Medical indemnity insurers will issue ROCS notices to those eligible doctors of whom they are aware. You should contact your insurer before you leave Australia to advise them of your departure, leave a forwarding address and arrange your cover under the ROCS.

If you meet the eligibility criteria you are still eligible for the ROCS even if you do not receive a ROCS notice.