HIV notifications data

This page contains data on HIV cases within Australia, including the proportion of late and advanced diagnoses. The data are provided by The Kirby Institute for infection and immunity in society, which is funded by the Department of Health to maintain the National HIV Registry. The Kirby Institute must be acknowledged for its provision of the data in any published work.

Page last updated: 08 May 2019

Table 1. Number of new HIV diagnoses notified in Australia, cumulative to 31 December 2017, by month and year of HIV diagnosis

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual Total
1984-2006 2,474 2,287 2,329 2,058 2297 2611 2198 2242 2202 2243 2354 2009 27304
2007 81 94 77 70 109 62 72 84 64 72 82 81 948
2008 78 88 79 69 85 76 76 72 55 95 69 59 901
2009 73 80 68 90 70 84 90 64 83 79 86 78 945
2010 71 84 83 81 79 73 78 73 79 66 75 66 908
2011 67 95 84 84 97 85 79 84 83 76 75 73 982
2012 78 103 109 74 86 70 88 104 85 109 95 65 1066
2013 74 81 77 83 94 88 94 96 90 95 94 66 1032
2014 105 96 98 84 91 84 97 81 94 88 80 86 1084
2015 81 80 80 84 74 81 105 81 85 87 96 92 1026
2016 106 93 85 88 89 82 74 93 89 98 59 57 1013
2017 88 76 75 81 92 82 83 78 69 89 80 70 963
Monthly Total 3376 3257 3244 2946 3263 3478 3134 3152 3078 3197 3245 2802 38172

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Late and advanced HIV diagnoses

Timely diagnosis of HIV infection can reduce an individual’s risk of morbidity and mortality, and have public health benefits by providing opportunities to reduce onward transmission, through mitigation of risk behaviours or commencing treatment to reduce infectivity.

These outcomes are monitored by measuring the proportion of HIV cases which are (i) diagnosed late, and (ii) diagnosed with advanced HIV.

A late diagnosis is indicated by a CD4+ cell count below 350 and suggests the infection was acquired around 4-5 years earlier. The CD4+ cell count reflects the level of circulating lymphocytes that are key components of the immune system.

Advanced HIV is when the CD4+ cell count falls below 200, a level which can lead to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), a disease characterised by opportunistic infections and cancers that are rare in people with normal immune systems.

Table 2. Proportion of new HIV notifications diagnosed as “late” (i.e. with a CD4+ cell count below 350) in Australia, cumulative to 31 December 2017, by month and year of HIV diagnosis

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual Total
2017 32% 37% 35% 37% 54% 30% 33% 34% 36% 29% 41% 29% 36%

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Table 3. Proportion of new HIV notifications diagnosed as “advanced” (i.e. with a CD4+ cell count below 200) in Australia, cumulative to 31 December 2017, by month and year of HIV diagnosis

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual Total
2017 22% 22% 21% 18% 28% 21% 22% 23% 32% 22% 21% 20% 23%

For further information on these tables please contact:
Surveillance and Evaluation Program for Public Health
The Kirby Institute for infection and immunity in society
University of New South Wales
Sydney 2052 Australia

Telephone: +61 2 9385 0900
Facsimile: +61 2 9385 0920
Email: The Kirby Institute
Website: The Kirby Institute for infection and immunity in society

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