Proof of vaccination

For travel into and out of Australia, travellers must provide proof of COVID-19 vaccination status. Find out what type of proof you need.

Definition of fully vaccinated

The Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI) have developed guidance on the definition of fully vaccinated for the purpose of people returning from overseas travel.  

Australia considers you to be fully vaccinated if you have completed a course, including a mixed dose schedule, of TGA approved or recognised vaccines

All inbound travellers must declare their vaccination status to enter Australia and provide appropriate proof. 

You must have had your final dose at least 7 days before travelling.

Australians travelling internationally

Australian citizens and permanent residents must have proof of vaccination to exit Australia and Australian residents seeking to enter Australia must declare their vaccination status.

If you are vaccinated, you must present your COVID-19 vaccination certificate to the airline staff when checking-in for your travel.

If vaccinated in Australia, you can get your International COVID-19 Vaccination Certificate (ICVC) from the MyGov portal. If in Australia but vaccinated overseas, you may be able to access an ICVC if you have been vaccinated with a vaccine approved or recognised by the TGA.

You will need to present your ICVC, or other proof of vaccination, when you check-in for your flight to or from Australia.

Australian citizens and permanent residents who cannot be vaccinated will be treated as vaccinated for the purposes of their travel. See Vaccination Exemptions and Medical contraindications for further information.

Travelling to Australia

International travellers to Australia (including Australians overseas) must declare their vaccination status to enter Australia and must be able to provide appropriate supporting evidence. Travellers will need to present this at check-in for their flight to Australia.

If you are vaccinated, you must present your COVID-19 vaccination certificate to the airline staff when checking-in for your travel and may also be requested to present it to border officials upon arrival in Australia.

Travellers vaccinated in other countries should present certificates in formats that meet the following criteria:

  • Issued by a national or state/provincial-level authority or an accredited vaccination provider
  • Written in English or accompanied by a certified translation
  • Containing at a minimum:
    • name as it appears in the traveller's passport
    • either date of birth or passport number
    • the vaccine brand name, and
    • the date of each dose or the date on which a full course of immunisation was completed.

Paper and digital certificates are equally acceptable.

For other travel requirements when coming to Australia, see COVID-19 and the border.

Vaccination Exemptions and Medical Contraindications

Children

Children do not need to provide proof of COVID-19 vaccination if they meet these conditions: 

  • Australian children aged 11 years and under, as demonstrated by their passport, count as fully vaccinated for outbound travel purposes (i.e. leaving Australia).
  • All children aged under 12 years and 3 months, as demonstrated by their passport, count as fully vaccinated for inbound travel purposes (i.e. coming to Australia).

State and territories may vary in their quarantine requirements for children. Please check the relevant state or territory of your first arrival for applicable quarantine requirements.

Evidence of Medical Contraindication to COVID-19 vaccine

People who cannot be vaccinated need to have a medical certificate which indicates that they have a medical contraindication to COVID-19 vaccines, that is, they cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons.

There are specific requirements for Australians seeking to leave Australia and for travellers coming to Australia. It is important that you follow the appropriate process, see the details below and in the Frequently asked Questions.

Medical contraindication – Australian Citizens and Permanent Residents departing Australia

Australians who are departing Australia must meet the requirements for a medical contraindication and, have their medical contraindication recorded in the Australian Immunisation Register. These travellers can access a COVID-19 Digital Certificate or immunisation history statement for travel purposes.   

Medical contraindication – Travellers coming to Australia

Travellers who do not have a medical contraindication recorded in the Australian Immunisation Register must provide a medical certificate that indicates they are unable to be vaccinated with a COVID-19 vaccine because of a medical condition.

The medical certificate must be provided by a registered medical practitioner (a doctor), be written in English, and must include the following information:

  • your name (this must match your travel identification documents)
  • date of medical consultation and details of your medical practitioner (that is, your doctor)
  • details that clearly outline that you cannot have a COVID-19 vaccine because of a medical condition which means you cannot receive a COVID-19 vaccination (medical contraindication to COVID-19 vaccine).

Requirements for Medical contraindication

Medical conditions considered to be a contraindication to COVID-19 vaccination and accepted as reasons that you cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons for the purpose of travel to Australia include:

Permanent

  • A previous anaphylaxis after a previous dose of a vaccine where no appropriate COVID-19 vaccine is available

Temporary

  • For an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, inflammatory cardiac illness within the past 3 months, e.g., myocarditis or pericarditis; acute rheumatic fever or acute rheumatic heart disease (i.e., with active myocardial inflammation); or acute decompensated heart failure.
  • For all COVID-19 vaccines:
    • Acute major medical condition (e.g. undergoing major surgery or hospital admission for a serious illness).
    • Treatment with anti-SARS-CoV-2 monoclonal antibody or convalescent plasma therapy in the previous 90 days
    • Any serious adverse event attributed to a previous dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, without another cause identified, and with no acceptable alternative vaccine available.
    • If the vaccinee is a risk to themselves or others during the vaccination process they may warrant a temporary vaccine exemption. This may include a range of individuals with underlying developmental or mental health disorders.

Conditions NOT considered to be a contraindication for COVID-19 vaccination and NOT accepted for the purpose of a medical exemption to vaccination for travel to Australia:

  • Chronic symptoms following COVID-19 ("Long COVID”).
  • Pregnancy
  • Previous infection with COVID-19 (confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection).

People who have received non TGA approved or recognised vaccines should not be certified in this category and cannot be treated as vaccinated for the purposes of their travel.

Guidance on acute major medical conditions that warrant a temporary medical exemption to vaccination is at ATAGI Expanded guidance on temporary medical exemptions for COVID-19 vaccines (health.gov.au). Note that a previous infection with COVID-19 is not a contraindication to vaccination ATAGI advice on the definition of fully vaccinated (health.gov.au).

Penalties apply for providing false and misleading information to a Government official when entering Australia. For more information, please see COVID-19 and the border Australia Travel Declaration.

More information and frequently asked questions

Coronavirus (COVID-19) frequently asked questions – International travellers

Find answers to frequently asked questions about travelling to and from Australia including pre-departure tests, vaccination status declarations and quarantine arrangements.

Last updated: 
18 January 2022

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