Medical Training Review Panel: Seventeenth Report

Basic Training

Page last updated: 09 April 2014

Periods of defined basic training prior to an individual commencing the advanced training program are required by nine specialties. Table 4.4 and Table 4.5 provide data on trainees for these specialties. Surgery has an integrated program, the SET program, which does not distinguish between basic and advanced trainees. Data on these are reported in the sections dealing with advanced training. It should be noted that ACRRM only has two basic training posts recorded in this section. The reason for this is that the training program for ACRRM has three stages of training: Core Clinical Training (CCT), Primary Rural and Remote Training (PRRT) and Advanced Specialised Training (AST). In the MTRP report CCT is now defined as basic training and PRRT and AST as advanced training. ACRRM accepts posts accredited by State Postgraduate Medical Councils for CCT stage of training but also has standards to accredit posts if required. The number of State Postgraduate Medical Councils accredited posts is not included in this section, only posts accredited by ACRRM. Therefore the majority of posts accredited by ACRRM are included in Advanced Training.

There have not been any ACRRM Independent Pathway trainees recorded in Table 4.7 under basic training as doctors on this pathway are experienced and are awarded recognised prior learning for the first year of training. Therefore all data relating to ACRRM Independent Pathway trainees are reported in the sections dealing with advanced training.

Further information on the training requirements for each specialty is provided in Appendix B.

In total there were 6,056 basic trainees, representing 33.9% of all trainees in 2013 (Table 4.3). This represents a 5.4% increase on the 5,744 basic vocational trainees from 2012. Growth of over 350% from the 1,339 trainees undertaking basic vocational training in 2002 is mainly related to many colleges introducing additional basic training as a pre-requisite to entry to advanced training as well as the introduction of a requirement for RACP trainees in their first year of training to register with the college.

The specialty with the largest number of basic trainees was adult medicine with 2,475 (Table 4.4).

Of the total number of basic trainees, 1,669 were in their first year. Over one-third (585 or 35.1%) of these basic trainees were in their first year of adult medicine. Just under one-fifth (313 or 18.8%) were commencing their first year of basic training in psychiatry, and 14.4% were commencing in emergency medicine. The number of first year basic trainees in anaesthesia dropped by about 100 trainees compared to 2012 (314).

All current ACEM trainees in basic training are considered in the same year (provisional training year, at least PGY3). This shows trainees who registered with ACEM for this current calendar year.

Table 4.4: Basic trainees and first-year basic trainees by medical specialty and state/territory, 2013
Medical specialty
NSW
Vic
Qld
SA
WA
Tas
NT
ACT
Aust
All basic trainees

(a) Includes introductory and basic trainees.
(b) Introductory training period is of 6 months.
(c) Most current ACEM trainees are in the same year (Provisional Training year, at least PGY3). The number shows trainees who registered with ACEM this calendar year.
(d) Includes intake plus existing 1st year trainees.

Source: Medical colleges

Adult medicine
590
763
544
204
242
58
23
51
2,475
Anaesthesia
187
122
128
40
44
18
1
15
(a)555
Dermatology
11
16
10
5
4
0
0
0
46
Emergency medicine
222
145
200
54
84
7
6
9
727
Intensive care
54
31
66
20
19
2
2
5
199
Obstetrics and gynaecology
109
100
74
22
24
11
4
12
356
Ophthalmology
19
17
7
3
3
1
2
1
53
Paediatrics
250
205
153
65
101
15
8
15
812
Psychiatry
268
204
200
56
62
20
7
16
833
Total
1,710
1,603
1,382
469
583
132
53
124
6,056
First-year basic trainees
Adult medicine
74
239
142
55
46
14
2
13
585
Anaesthesia
89
46
43
12
16
6
0
3
(b)215
Dermatology
6
9
4
1
2
0
0
0
22
Emergency medicine
82
51
54
17
31
2
2
2
(c)241
Intensive care
4
1
11
4
3
0
0
5
28
Obstetrics and gynaecology
32
23
20
4
4
3
0
3
89
Ophthalmology
9
7
4
1
2
0
2
0
25
Paediatrics
30
41
32
16
20
3
5
4
151
Psychiatry
71
77
92
22
30
10
4
7
(d)313
Total
397
494
402
132
154
38
15
37
1,669

In 2013, just over half (3,235 or 53.4%) of all basic trainees were female (Table 4.5). The specialty with the largest number of females was adult medicine, with 1,224 female basic trainees. However, the proportion of females was much higher in two particular specialties, obstetrics and gynaecology and paediatrics in which 80.6% and 71.4% respectively of all trainees were female.

Table 4.5: Female basic trainees by medical specialty and state/territory, 2013
Medical specialty
NSW
Vic
Qld
SA
WA
Tas
NT
ACT
Aust
Female basic trainees

(a) The proportion of female trainees in ACT, NT and TAS varies according to rostered rotations.

Source: Medical colleges

Adult medicine
295
421
238
102
111
19
11
27
1,224
Anaesthesia
93
55
54
16
19
8
0
9
254
Dermatology
4
10
6
2
4
0
0
0
26
Emergency medicine
99
60
89
16
37
4
3
4
312
Intensive care
25
11
23
9
8
0
2
2
80
Obstetrics and gynaecology
88
84
58
19
16
8
4
10
287
Ophthalmology
4
6
3
0
3
0
1
1
(a)18
Paediatrics
178
148
106
55
69
8
7
9
580
Psychiatry
131
118
97
34
47
13
3
11
454
Total
917
913
674
253
314
60
31
73
3,235
Proportion of all basic trainees (%)
Adult medicine
50.0
55.2
43.8
50.0
45.9
32.8
47.8
52.9
49.5
Anaesthesia
49.7
45.1
42.2
40.0
43.2
44.4
0.0
60.0
45.8
Dermatology
36.4
62.5
60.0
40.0
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
56.5
Emergency medicine
44.6
41.4
44.5
29.6
44.0
57.1
50.0
44.4
42.9
Intensive care
46.3
35.5
34.8
45.0
42.1
0.0
100.0
40.0
40.2
Obstetrics and gynaecology
80.7
84.0
78.4
86.4
66.7
72.7
100.0
83.3
80.6
Ophthalmology
21.1
35.3
42.9
0.0
100.0
0.0
50.0
100.0
34.0
Paediatrics
71.2
72.2
69.3
84.6
68.3
53.3
87.5
60.0
71.4
Psychiatry
48.9
57.8
48.5
60.7
75.8
65.0
42.9
68.8
54.5
Total
53.6
57.0
48.8
53.9
53.9
45.5
58.5
58.9
53.4