Medical Training Review Panel: sixteenth report

Basic Training

Page last updated: 09 April 2013

Periods of defined basic training prior to an individual commencing the advanced training program are required by nine specialties. Tables 4.4 and 4.5 provide data on trainees for these specialties. Surgery has an integrated program, the Surgical and Education and Training (SET) program does not distinguish between basic and advanced trainees, data on these are reported in the sections dealing with advanced training. It should be noted that ACRRM does not have any basic trainees recorded in this section this year. The reasons for this is that the training program for ACRRM has three stages of training; Core Clinical (CCT), Primary Rural and Remote (PRRT) and Advanced Specialised Training (AST). This year the definition for basic was defined as CCT, and PRRT and AST for advanced trainees. There have not been any Independent Pathway trainees recorded as basic training as Postgraduate Medical Councils accredit this year for general practice training (CCT). Therefore all data relating to ACRRM trainees are reported in the sections dealing with advanced training.

Further information on the training requirements for each specialty is provided in Appendix B.

In total there were 5,744 basic trainees, representing 34.3% of all trainees in 2012 (Table 4.4). This is a marked increase from the 1,339 trainees undertaking basic vocational training in 2002. The main reasons for this increase is that many colleges have since introduced additional basic training as a pre-requisite to entry to advanced training as well as the introduction of a requirement for RACP trainees in their first year of training to register with the college.

The specialty with the largest number of basic trainees was adult medicine (2,197) (Table 4.4).

Of the total number of basic trainees, 1,805 were in their first year. Just over one-third (610 or 33.8%) of these basic trainees were in their first year of adult medicine. Just under one-fifth (314 or 17.4%) were commencing their first year of basic training in each anaesthesia and psychiatry.

All current ACEM trainees in basic training are considered in the same year (provisional training year, at least PGY3). This shows trainees who registered with ACEM for this current calendar year.

Table 4.4: Basic trainees and first-year basic trainees by medical specialty and state/territory, 2012

(a) Does not include 7 trainees based overseas.
(b) Does not include 4 trainees based overseas.
(c) All current ACEM trainees in Basic training are in the same year (Provisional Training year, at least PGY3). This shows trainees who registered with ACEM this calendar year.

Source: Medical colleges

Medical specialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
All basic trainees
Adult medicine(a)
525
679
459
197
230
50
22
35
2,197
Anaesthesia
197
148
144
41
50
18
3
14
615
Dermatology
10
12
11
6
2
0
0
1
42
Emergency medicine
239
180
228
59
79
17
7
12
821
Intensive care
54
25
59
24
13
6
2
9
192
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
105
104
78
25
25
7
0
10
354
Ophthalmology
20
16
7
4
4
2
1
1
55
Paediatrics(b)
196
181
123
66
70
14
3
11
664
Psychiatry
261
203
176
56
64
20
8
16
804
Total
1,607
1,548
1,285
478
537
134
46
109
5,744
First-year basic trainees
Adult medicine
78
244
123
59
69
19
8
10
610
Anaesthesia
101
78
78
19
20
9
1
8
314
Dermatology
5
7
8
4
2
0
0
0
26
Emergency medicine(c)
74
43
68
18
31
3
1
2
240
Intensive care
2
2
3
1
1
0
0
0
9
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
25
24
19
6
6
1
0
2
83
Ophthalmology
8
10
4
2
1
1
1
1
28
Paediatrics
41
56
32
13
25
8
1
5
181
Psychiatry
73
81
85
24
35
9
5
2
314
Total
407
545
420
146
190
50
17
30
1,805

In 2012, just over half (2,962 or 51.6%) of all basic trainees were female (Table 4.5). The specialty with the largest number of females was adult medicine, with 1,075 female basic trainees. However, the proportion of females was much higher in two particular specialties, obstetrics and gynaecology and paediatrics in which 79.4% and 72.7% respectively of all trainees were female.

Table 4.5: Female basic trainees by medical specialty and state/territory, 2012

(a) Does not include 4 trainees based overseas.
(b) There are 3 basic trainees without a gender assigned.
(c) The gender of the trainees in ACT, NT and TAS vary according to rostered rotations.
(d) Does not include 3 trainees based overseas.

Source: Medical colleges

Medical specialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
Female basic trainees
Adult medicine(a)
260
366
199
97
101
21
13
18
1,075
Anaesthesia
87
72
65
21
20
7
2
9
283
Dermatology
4
6
6
1
2
0
0
0
19
Emergency medicine(b)
102
78
99
17
35
7
3
7
348
Intensive care
15
11
19
7
4
2
1
3
62
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
85
85
59
21
17
6
0
8
281
Ophthalmology(c)
9
6
5
1
2
0
0
0
23
Paediatrics(d)
145
133
81
50
56
11
1
6
483
Psychiatry
127
104
70
31
42
5
4
5
388
Total
834
861
603
246
279
59
24
56
2,962
Proportion of all basic trainees (%)
Adult medicine
49.5
53.9
43.4
49.2
43.9
42.0
59.1
51.4
48.9
Anaesthesia
44.2
48.6
45.1
51.2
40.0
38.9
66.7
64.3
46.0
Dermatology
40.0
50.0
54.5
16.7
100.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
45.2
Emergency medicine
42.7
43.3
43.4
28.8
44.3
41.2
42.9
58.3
42.4
Intensive care
27.8
44.0
32.2
29.2
30.8
33.3
50.0
33.3
32.3
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
81.0
81.7
75.6
84.0
68.0
85.7
0.0
80.0
79.4
Ophthalmology
45.0
37.5
71.4
25.0
50.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
41.8
Paediatrics
74.0
73.5
65.9
75.8
80.0
78.6
33.3
54.5
72.7
Psychiatry
48.7
51.2
39.8
55.4
65.6
25.0
50.0
31.3
48.3
Total
51.9
55.6
46.9
51.5
52.0
44.0
52.2
51.4
51.6