Medical Training Review Panel: fifteenth report

Vocational Training Data

Page last updated: 15 March 2012

In 2011, there were 15,478 vocational training positions/trainees (Table 4.3). The largest number was in adult medicine (3,420), followed by general practice (3,095) and emergency medicine (1,875). Anaesthesia, paediatrics and psychiatry also had more than a thousand trainees (1,183, 1,170 and 1,029 respectively).

Data cover all Australian trainees, as well as international medical graduates (IMGs) who are registered vocational trainees and who are working, being supervised or training in an accredited training position, post, facility or program. A number of medical colleges provide training overseas and Australian trainees within these overseas programs are included in the data, whereas non‑Australian trainees are excluded.

It should be noted that numbers reported for some specialties differ sometimes across tables. This is primarily due to variation in what is included in the numbers in respect to New Zealand and other overseas trainees. Differences in inclusions are duly noted in the table footnotes where applicable.

Table 4.3: Vocational training positions/trainees by medical specialty, 2011

(a) At the beginning of 2011 GPET undertook a major information management system upgrade, with a new training records system and data warehouse. This will affect comparability of data with previous years.
(b) ACRRM Independent Pathway registrars only.
(c) 6 trainees are completing their final year of training overseas.
(d) Only includes trainees fully registered with both colleges.
(e) Includes 170 fellows undertaking subspecialty training.
(f) RACS does not differentiate between basic and advanced surgical trainees, as the surgical program is an integrated program (SET).

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

Medical specialtyBasic traineesAdvanced traineesTotal college trainees
Addiction medicine
..
13
13
Adult medicine
1,951
1,469
3,420
Anaesthesia
617
566
1,183
Anaesthesia – Pain medicine
..
58
58
Dermatology
44
54
98
Emergency medicine
– ACEM
785
1,057
1,842
– RACP
..
33
33
General practice
– GPET(a)
..
2,948
2,948
– ACRRM(b)
141
6
147
Intensive care
152
312
464
Medical administration
..
86
86
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
330
143
473
Occupational and Environmental medicine
..
80
80
Ophthalmology
53
(c)86
139
Paediatrics
530
640
1,170
Palliative medicine
..
71
71
Pathology(d)
..
314
314
Pathology and RACP (jointly)(d)
..
173
173
Psychiatry
661
(e)368
1,029
Public health medicine
..
72
72
Radiation oncology
137
137
Radiodiagnosis
366
366
Rehabilitation medicine
..
162
162
Sexual health medicine
..
7
7
Sport and exercise medicine
0
27
27
Surgery(f)
..
966
966
Total
5,264
10,214
15,478

Basic Training

Periods of defined basic training prior to an individual commencing the advanced training program are required by 11 specialties. Tables 4.4 and 4.5 provide data on trainees for these specialties. It should be noted that surgery has an integrated program, the Surgical Education and Training (SET) program, that does not distinguish between basic and advanced trainees and that data on these are reported in the sections dealing with advanced training.

Further information on the training requirements for each specialty is provided in Appendix B.

In total there were 5,264 basic trainees, representing 34.5% of all trainees in 2011 (Table 4.4). This is a marked increase from the 757 trainees undertaking basic vocational training in 1997, when the data were first reported. The main reason for this increase is that many colleges have since introduced additional basic training as a pre-requisite to advanced training.

The specialty with the largest number of basic trainees was adult medicine (1,951) (Table 4.4).

Of the total number of basic trainees, 1,425 were in their first year. Two-fifths (40.9% or 583) of these basic trainees were in their first year of adult medicine. Just over another fifth (22.5% or 321) were commencing their first of two years’ basic training in anaesthesia.

As emergency medicine allows new trainees to enter the program at any time during basic or provisional training, the number of first-year emergency medicine trainees is not included.

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Table 4.4: Basic trainees and first-year basic trainees by medical specialty and state/territory, 2011

(a) Does not include trainees based overseas.
(b) ACRRM Independent Pathway registrars only.
(c) All current ACEM trainees in Provisional (Basic) training are in the same year (at least PGY3).

Source: Medical colleges

Medical specialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
All basic trainees
Adult medicine(a)
473
595
402
172
214
41
15
39
1,951
Anaesthesia
193
137
153
44
51
18
3
18
617
Dermatology
18
13
9
3
0
1
0
0
44
Emergency medicine
223
197
206
55
55
28
6
15
785
General practice
– ACRRM(b)
24
8
71
6
18
7
7
0
141
Intensive care
52
22
43
19
6
3
2
5
152
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
93
100
81
20
22
7
1
6
330
Ophthalmology
23
14
6
4
6
0
0
0
53
Paediatrics(a)
157
136
92
56
62
12
5
10
530
Psychiatry
252
166
126
40
47
13
3
14
661
Sport and exercise medicine
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Total
1,508
1,388
1,189
419
481
130
42
107
5,264
First-year basic trainees
Adult medicine(a)
130
197
109
50
64
16
9
8
583
Anaesthesia
100
72
78
24
23
11
3
10
321
Dermatology
8
6
4
2
0
0
0
0
20
Emergency medicine(c)
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
Intensive care
2
1
3
1
0
0
0
0
7
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
31
24
18
4
7
2
0
1
87
Ophthalmology
12
7
2
2
3
0
0
0
26
Paediatrics(a)
29
46
25
23
12
5
0
2
142
Psychiatry
75
57
59
18
21
5
3
1
239
Sport and exercise medicine
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Total
387
410
298
124
130
39
15
22
1,425

In 2011, half (2,672 or 50.8%) of all basic trainees were female (Table 4.5). The specialty with the largest number of females was adult medicine, with 973 female basic trainees. However, the proportion of females was much higher in a number of specialities, namely obstetrics and gynaecology, paediatrics and dermatology in which 77.6%, 70.6% and 63.6% respectively of all trainees were female.

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Table 4.5: Female basic trainees by medical specialty and state/territory, 2011

(a)ACRRM Independent Pathway registrars only.

Source: Medical colleges

Medical specialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
Female basic trainees
Adult medicine
241
327
179
82
97
15
9
23
973
Anaesthesia
91
73
63
21
19
5
3
8
283
Dermatology
14
8
6
0
0
0
0
0
28
Emergency medicine
94
82
80
12
22
11
3
5
309
General practice
– ACRRM(a)
3
1
13
2
2
2
0
0
23
Intensive care
11
7
15
1
0
1
1
1
37
Medical administration
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
75
81
57
18
15
5
1
4
256
Ophthalmology
10
6
3
3
1
0
0
0
23
Paediatrics
116
98
55
39
48
9
3
6
374
Psychiatry
132
101
58
24
34
5
2
10
366
Sport and exercise medicine
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Total
787
784
529
202
238
53
22
57
2,672
Proportion of all basic trainees (%)
Adult medicine
51.0
55.0
44.5
47.7
45.3
36.6
60.0
59.0
49.9
Anaesthesia
47.2
53.3
41.2
47.7
37.3
27.8
100.0
44.4
45.9
Dermatology
77.8
61.5
66.7
0
0
0
0
0
63.6
Emergency medicine
42.2
41.6
38.8
21.8
40.0
39.3
50.0
33.3
39.4
General practice
– ACRRM(a)
12.5
12.5
18.3
33.3
11.1
28.6
0
0
16.3
Intensive care
21.2
31.8
34.9
5.3
0
33.3
50.0
20.0
24.3
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
80.6
81.0
70.4
90
68.2
71.4
100.0
66.7
77.6
Ophthalmology
43.5
42.9
50.0
75.0
16.7
0
0
0
43.4
Paediatrics
73.9
72.1
59.8
69.6
77.4
75.0
60.0
60.0
70.6
Psychiatry
52.4
60.8
46.0
60.0
72.3
38.5
66.7
71.4
55.4
Sport and exercise medicine
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Total
52.2
56.5
44.5
48.2
49.5
40.8
52.4
53.3
50.8

Trends in Basic Vocational Training

From 2007 to 2011 there were incremental increases each year in the number of first-year basic trainees. This resulted in the total number of basic trainees being 61.1% higher in 2011 than five years earlier (Table 4.6).

It should be noted, however, that figures for earlier years are not necessarily comparable due to training program changes, notably the introduction of a requirement for basic training prior to proceeding to advanced training in some specialties in the five-year period.

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Table 4.6: Vocational training positions/trainees: Total, basic, female basic and first-year basic trainees, 2007–2011

Source: Medical colleges

Total college traineesBasic training positions/ traineesFemale basic traineesProportion female (%) First-year basic traineesProportion first-year (%)
2007
10,100
3,267
1,834
56.1
852
26.1
2008
11,668
4,087
1,878
46.0
854
20.9
2009
12,958
4,502
2,133
47.4
965
21.4
2010
14,679
5,040
2,498
49.6
1,244
24.7
2011
15,478
5,264
2,672
50.8
1,425
27.1
Increase 2007–2011 (%)
53.2
61.1
45.7
-9.6
67.3
3.8

Adult medicine doubled the number of basic trainees between 2007 and 2011 (Table 4.7). However, there were larger proportional increases in paediatrics and emergency medicine, which increased by 178.9% and 145.3% respectively.

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Table 4.7: Basic training positions/trainees by medical specialty, 2007–2011

Source: Medical colleges

Medical specialty20072008200920102011Increase 2007–2011 (%)
Adult medicine
967
1,609
1,666
1,893
1,951
101.8
Anaesthesia
360
410
509
504
617
71.4
Dermatology
38
41
39
42
44
15.8
Emergency medicine
320
319
732
803
785
145.3
General practice
– ACRRM
..
..
..
50
141
..
Intensive care
125
114
82
167
152
21.6
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
na
277
301
295
330
..
Ophthalmology
50
51
53
55
53
72.0
Paediatrics
190
436
459
554
530
178.9
Psychiatry
610
623
661
677
661
8.4
Surgery
607
207
..
..
..
..
Total
3,267
4,087
4,502
5,040
5,264
61.1

In terms of basic trainee numbers, the increases in 2011 compared with 2007 were greatest in the two largest states, New South Wales and Victoria (Table 4.8). As a proportion, the growth was greatest in Queensland and Victoria (43.1 % and 40.5% respectively).

The numbers in each jurisdiction have increased each year, with the exception of the smaller jurisdictions. In particular, it should be noted that the numbers for Tasmania, the Northern Territory and the Australian Capital Territory are higher in 2007 that would be consistent with their size and available training capacity. This has resulted in net decrease in basic training numbers over the five year period. However, from 2008 an upward trend in basic training is apparent in Tasmania and ACT.

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Table 4.8: Basic training positions/trainees by state/territory, 2007–2011

Source: Medical colleges

NSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
2007
1,162
988
831
375
409
238
188
225
3,267
2008
1,262
1,078
870
309
352
93
45
78
4,087
2009
1,336
1,155
1,034
369
372
92
43
96
4,502
2010
1,492
1,275
1,148
424
437
106
53
105
5,040
2011
1,508
1,388
1,189
419
481
130
42
107
5,264
Increase 2007–2011 (%)
29.8
40.5
43.1
11.7
17.6
-45.4
-77.7
-52.4
61.1

Behind the increases in overall basic trainee numbers are major increases in some specialties in the intake of new trainees. Adult medicine showed a marked increase in first‑year basic trainees over the five years, increasing 188.6% from 202 in 2007 to 583 in 2011. Psychiatry showed a similar proportional increase of 165.6% from 90 to 239 first-year basic trainees in 2011. The largest proportional increase, however, was in paediatrics, which increased six-fold (517.4%) from 23 first-year basic trainees in 2007 to 142 first-year basic trainees in 2011 (Table 4.9).

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Table 4.9: First-year basic trainees by medical specialty, 2007–2011

Source: Medical colleges

Medical specialty20072008200920102011Increase 2007–2011 (%)
First-year basic trainees
Adult medicine
202
336
436
522
583
188.6
Anaesthesia
195
197
169
240
321
64.6
Dermatology
16
23
18
23
20
25.0
Emergency medicine
54
9
..
..
..
..
Intensive care
14
7
2
11
7
-50.0
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
..
81
81
77
87
..
Ophthalmology
24
24
27
25
26
8.3
Paediatrics
23
67
114
123
142
517.4
Psychiatry
90
109
118
223
239
165.6
Surgery
234
1
..
..
..
..
Total
852
854
965
1,244
1,425
67.3

Table 4.10 shows the numbers of first-year basic trainees in each state and territory for 2007 to 2011.

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Table 4.10: First-year basic trainees by state/territory, 2007–2011

Source: Medical colleges

NSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
First-year basic trainees
2007
215
240
233
55
65
25
6
13
852
2008
214
250
196
71
70
25
11
17
854
2009
257
286
210
90
78
20
4
20
965
2010
350
341
267
124
100
22
16
24
1,244
2011
387
410
298
124
130
39
15
22
1,425

Table 4.11 shows the proportions female basic trainees in each specialty. There do not appear to be any significant trends, but rather the table highlights the fluctuations in the numbers of female basic trainees in specialties from one year to another.

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Table 4.11: Proportion of female basic trainees by medical specialty, 2007–2011

Source: Medical colleges

Medical specialty20072008200920102011Increase 2007–2011 (%)
Proportion female (%)
Adult medicine
60.8
41.0
44.8
47.4
49.9
-17.9
Anaesthesia
38.9
40.0
33.2
45.0
45.9
18.0
Dermatology
63.2
73.2
64.1
64.3
63.6
0.6
Emergency medicine
45.9
46.7
38.4
38.2
39.4
-14.2
General practice
– ACRRM
..
..
..
26.0
16.3
..
Intensive care
24.8
28.1
31.7
33.5
24.3
-2.0
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
..
63.2
65.1
69.8
77.6
..
Ophthalmology
34.0
33.3
35.8
40.0
43.4
27.6
Paediatrics
0
66.7
66.4
67.9
70.6
70.6
Psychiatry
54.3
50.6
55.2
54.1
55.4
2.0
Surgery
25.5
22.2
..
..
..
..
Total
56.1
46.0
47.4
49.6
50.8
-9.4
Total female trainees
1,834
1,878
2,133
2,498
2,672
45.7

Table 4.12 provides data on female basic trainees by state and territory. Greater fluctuations are generally seen in those jurisdictions with smaller basic trainee numbers.

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Table 4.12: Proportion of female basic trainees by state/territory, 2007–2011

Source: Medical colleges

NSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
Proportion female (%)
2007
51.2
54.7
40.7
35.7
34.2
11.8
4.8
20.0
56.1
2008
49.1
50.0
40.5
42.4
42.0
32.3
37.8
52.6
46.0
2009
48.6
53.4
41.2
46.9
46.0
27.2
55.8
47.9
47.4
2010
51.3
56.0
42.0
50.0
49.7
29.2
41.5
51.4
49.6
2011
52.2
56.5
44.5
48.2
49.5
40.8
52.4
53.3
50.8

Advanced Training

In 2011, there were 10,194 advanced vocational training positions/trainees in programs in Australia (Table 4.13). This constitutes two thirds (66.0%) of the total number of vocational training positions/trainees. General practice had the highest number of advanced trainees (2,948), followed by adult medicine (1,469), emergency medicine (1,057) and surgery (966).

Table 4.13 also shows the distribution of advanced training positions/trainees across states and territories.

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Table 4.13: Advanced vocational training positions/trainees by medical specialty and state/territory, 2011

(a) At the beginning of 2011 GPET undertook a major information management system upgrade with a new training records system and data warehouse.
(b) ACT trainees are included in NSW total.
(c) A registrar who moved between states during 2011 will be counted against both states but only once in the total.
(d) ACRRM Independent Pathway registrars only.
(e) Includes 6 trainees who are completing their final year of training overseas.
(f) Only includes trainees fully registered with both colleges.
(g) Includes 170 fellows undertaking subspecialty training.
(h) Only 52 of the 72 enrolled advanced trainees were actively training at the time of data extraction.
(i) RACS does not differentiate between basic and advanced surgical trainees, as the surgical program is an integrated program (SET).

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

Medical specialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
Addiction medicine
5
1
2
2
2
0
1
0
13
Adult medicine
448
450
262
145
98
24
9
33
1,469
Anaesthesia
169
149
118
50
54
11
2
13
566
Anaesthesia – Pain medicine
24
18
8
4
2
1
0
1
58
Dermatology
14
14
12
7
6
1
0
0
54
Emergency medicine
– ACEM
289
243
254
85
128
20
22
16
1,057
– RACP
9
6
12
3
3
0
0
0
33
General practice
– GPET(a)
(b)1,003
645
645
245
256
95
78
(b)na
(c)2,948
– ACRRM(d)
2
0
2
0
1
0
1
0
6
Intensive care
89
81
62
31
31
8
3
7
312
Medical administration
20
21
26
2
11
0
1
5
86
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
55
36
30
8
7
3
0
4
143
Occupational and Environmental medicine
25
10
17
9
16
0
0
3
80
Ophthalmology
35
21
13
8
6
1
1
1
(e)86
Paediatrics
221
165
115
45
74
4
12
4
640
Palliative medicine
24
19
9
14
4
1
0
0
71
Pathology(f)
104
75
65
21
32
7
3
7
314
Pathology and
RACP (jointly)(f)
59
58
24
10
17
1
0
4
173
Psychiatry
118
124
64
26
24
2
2
8
(g)368
Public health medicine
20
9
5
6
3
1
5
3
(h)52
Radiation oncology
59
32
27
8
10
1
0
0
137
Radiodiagnosis
102
101
72
41
33
7
0
10
366
Rehabilitation medicine
70
38
29
12
7
3
1
2
162
Sexual health medicine
3
2
1
0
0
0
1
0
7
Sport and
exercise medicine
9
11
1
0
2
0
1
3
27
Surgery(i)
338
267
167
70
85
16
8
15
966
Total
3,314
2,596
2,042
852
912
207
151
139
10,194

Overall, advanced trainees were reasonably well distributed across states and territories when compared with their relative proportions of the Australian population. For the larger specialties, the proportions of trainees across states and territories also roughly mirrored the relative proportions of the population in each (Table 4.14).

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Table 4.14: Proportion of advanced vocational training positions/trainees by medical specialty and state/territory, 2011

(a) At the beginning of 2011 GPET undertook a major information management system upgrade with a new training records system and data warehouse.
(b) ACT trainees are included in NSW total.
(c) ACRRM Independent Pathway registrars only.
(d) Population data from ABS. 3101.0 – Australian Demographic Statistics, March 2011. Released 29/09/2011.

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

Medical specialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACT
Proportion (%)
Addiction medicine
38.5
7.7
15.4
15.4
15.4
0
7.7
0
Adult medicine
30.5
30.6
17.8
9.9
6.7
1.6
0.6
2.2
Anaesthesia
29.9
26.3
20.8
8.8
9.5
1.9
0.4
2.3
Anaesthesia – Pain medicine
41.4
31.0
13.8
6.9
3.4
1.7
0
1.7
Dermatology
25.9
25.9
22.2
13.0
11.1
1.9
0
0
Emergency medicine
– ACEM
27.3
23.0
24.0
8.0
12.1
1.9
2.1
1.5
– RACP
27.3
18.2
36.4
9.1
9.1
0
0
0
General practice
– GPET(a)
(b)34.0
21.9
21.9
8.3
8.7
3.2
2.6
(b)na
– ACRRM(c)
33.3
0
33.3
0
16.7
0
16.7
0
Intensive care
28.5
26.0
19.9
9.9
9.9
2.6
1.0
2.2
Medical administration
23.3
24.4
30.2
2.3
12.8
0
1.2
5.8
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
38.5
25.2
21.0
5.6
4.9
2.1
0
2.8
Occupational and Environmental medicine
31.3
12.5
21.3
11.3
20.0
0
0
3.8
Ophthalmology
40.7
24.4
15.1
9.3
7.0
1.2
1.2
1.2
Paediatrics
34.5
25.8
18.0
7.0
11.6
0.6
1.9
0.6
Palliative medicine
33.8
26.8
12.7
19.7
5.6
1.4
0
0
Pathology
33.1
23.9
20.7
6.7
10.2
2.2
1.0
2.2
Pathology and RACP (jointly)
34.1
33.5
13.9
5.8
9.8
0.6
0
2.3
Psychiatry
32.1
33.7
17.4
7.1
6.5
0.5
0.5
2.2
Public health medicine
38.5
17.3
9.6
11.5
5.8
1.9
9.6
5.8
Radiation oncology
43.1
23.4
19.7
5.8
7.3
0.7
0
0
Radiodiagnosis
27.9
27.6
19.7
11.2
9.0
1.9
0
2.7
Rehabilitation medicine
43.2
23.5
17.9
7.4
4.3
1.9
0.6
1.2
Sexual health medicine
42.9
28.6
14.3
0
0
0
14.3
0
Sport and exercise medicine
33.3
40.7
3.7
0
7.4
0
3.7
11.1
Surgery
35.0
27.6
17.3
7.2
8.8
1.7
0.8
1.6
Total
32.5
25.5
20.0
8.4
8.9
2.0
1.5
1.4
Population proportion (%)(d)
32.3
24.9
20.2
7.3
10.3
2.3
1.0
1.6

First-year Advanced Trainees

In 2011, there were 2,817 first-year advanced vocational training positions/trainees (Table 4.15). The specialty with the most first-year advanced vocational training places was general practice (924), followed by adult medicine (408).

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Table 4.15: First-year advanced vocational training positions/trainees by medical specialty and state/territory, 2011

(a) At the beginning of 2011 GPET undertook a major information management system upgrade with a new training records system and data warehouse.
(b) ACT trainees are included in NSW total.
(c) ACRRM Independent Pathway registrars only.
(d) Only includes trainees fully registered with both colleges and new registrants up until the 12 August 2011.
(e) Includes trainees undertaking subspecialty training.
(f) RACS does not differentiate between basic and advanced surgical trainees, as the surgical program is an integrated program (SET).
(g) Total number of surgical training posts is 259, including 207 Australian, 51 New Zealand and 1 overseas.

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

Medical specialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
Addiction medicine
3
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
4
Adult medicine
114
132
71
33
36
7
2
13
408
Anaesthesia
53
54
37
18
16
7
2
6
193
Anaesthesia - Pain medicine
11
6
3
2
3
1
0
0
26
Dermatology
7
10
3
4
4
0
0
0
28
Emergency medicine
– ACEM
73
52
72
19
29
9
4
4
262
– RACP
3
2
9
1
0
0
0
0
15
General practice
– GPET(a)
(b)437
245
120
35
41
27
13
(b)na
918
– ACRRM(c)
2
0
2
0
1
0
1
0
6
Intensive care
12
16
15
5
8
2
0
0
58
Medical administration
3
5
11
1
3
0
0
2
25
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
22
7
17
5
4
1
0
2
58
Occupational and Environmental medicine
1
1
7
2
7
0
0
1
19
Ophthalmology
11
6
4
2
2
1
1
1
28
Paediatrics
55
39
37
16
16
2
4
1
170
Palliative medicine
1
3
3
4
0
0
0
0
11
Pathology(d)
19
6
7
2
2
0
1
3
40
Pathology and RACP (jointly)(d)
15
10
7
4
3
0
0
2
41
Psychiatry
33
30
21
13
12
1
0
2
(e)112
Public health medicine
11
4
2
2
0
0
0
3
22
Radiation oncology
10
6
8
1
1
1
0
0
27
Radiodiagnosis
30
24
23
8
7
2
0
2
96
Rehabilitation medicine
16
11
3
2
0
2
0
0
34
Sexual health medicine
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
Sport and exercise medicine
2
5
0
0
0
0
0
1
8
Surgery(f)
78
49
40
11
18
7
2
2
(g)207
Total
1,022
724
522
190
214
70
30
45
2,817

Female Trainees

Half (5,116 or 50.2%) of all advanced vocational trainees were female (Table 4.16). This proportion was far higher in some specialties, with females comprising three-fifths or more of advanced vocational trainees in public health medicine, paediatrics, general practice, rehabilitation medicine and psychiatry (73.1%, 65.9%, 65.8%, 64.8% and 63.0% respectively).

A number of smaller specialties showed relatively low proportions of females. In smaller specialties there was greater variation, but of the larger specialties, surgery and intensive care were notable for the low proportions of female advanced trainees (23.8% and 26.9% respectively).

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Table 4.16: Female advanced vocational trainees by medical specialty and state/territory, 2011

(a) At the beginning of 2011 GPET undertook a major information management system upgrade with a new training records system and data warehouse.
(b) ACT trainees are included in NSW total.
(c) A registrar who moved between states during 2011 will be counted against both states but only once in the total.
(d) RACS does not differentiate between basic and advanced surgical trainees, as the surgical program is an integrated program (SET).
(e) Total number of female surgical trainees is 287, including 230 Australian, 52 New Zealand and 5 overseas.

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

Medical specialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
Addiction medicine
2
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
4
Adult medicine
215
205
96
61
32
7
4
12
632
Anaesthesia
82
72
35
25
23
4
1
2
244
Anaesthesia – Pain medicine
6
6
1
1
2
0
0
0
16
Dermatology
6
12
7
5
2
1
0
0
33
Emergency medicine
– ACEM
122
101
103
30
55
9
13
1
434
– RACP
5
6
6
0
2
0
0
0
19
General practice
– GPET(a)
(b)695
403
404
164
179
67
46
(b)na
(c)1,941
– ACRRM
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
Intensive care
30
21
17
6
8
0
0
2
84
Medical administration
8
7
12
1
5
0
1
2
36
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
34
22
16
5
5
1
0
3
86
Occupational and Environmental medicine
8
2
2
2
2
0
0
1
17
Ophthalmology
14
11
2
4
2
0
0
0
33
Paediatrics
150
121
75
22
41
3
7
3
422
Palliative medicine
19
13
4
7
3
0
0
0
46
Pathology
72
41
35
11
15
4
3
5
186
Pathology and RACP (jointly)
28
27
13
6
6
0
0
2
82
Psychiatry
70
73
44
16
14
6
3
6
232
Public health medicine
13
8
2
3
5
0
5
2
38
Radiation oncology
40
14
14
3
0
0
0
0
71
Radiodiagnosis
37
31
20
17
6
0
0
4
115
Rehabilitation medicine
46
24
19
9
5
0
1
1
105
Sexual health medicine
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
2
Sport and exercise medicine
2
3
0
0
0
0
0
1
6
Surgery(d)
79
72
36
13
19
4
6
1
(e)230
Total
1,784
1,295
965
411
431
106
93
48
5,116

Part-time Training

Some colleges provide the opportunity for trainees to train part-time subject to approval by the employing authority, such as the hospital or laboratory.

In 2011, there were 970 part-time advanced trainees across specialties. This represents almost one-tenth (9.5%) of all advanced trainees (Table 4.17).

Part-time training was most common in public health medicine and general practice, with just over one-fifth (23.1 and 20.3%) of trainees in these specialties undertaking their training on a part-time basis.

A number of other specialties were notable for the relatively small numbers of trainees undertaking part-time training. It should be noted, however, that the availability of part‑time training and interrupted training varies across specialties. Further information on this can be found in Appendix B.

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Table 4.17: Advanced vocational trainees undertaking part-time training by medical specialty and state/territory, 2011

(a) At the beginning of 2011 GPET undertook a major information management system upgrade with a new training records system and data warehouse.
(b) ACT trainees are included in NSW total.

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

Medical specialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
Addiction medicine
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
Adult medicine
15
19
10
14
2
1
0
3
64
Anaesthesia
8
10
5
1
1
0
0
0
25
Anaesthesia – Pain medicine
4
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
6
Dermatology
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
Emergency medicine
– ACEM
16
8
2
5
3
0
0
2
36
– RACP
4
1
3
0
0
0
0
0
8
General practice
– GPET(a)
(b)191
132
126
59
37
29
27
(b)na
601
– ACRRM
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Intensive care
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
3
Medical administration
2
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
5
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
3
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
7
Occupational and Environmental medicine
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Ophthalmology
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Paediatrics
35
35
15
4
5
0
1
0
95
Palliative medicine
0
4
1
2
1
0
0
0
8
Pathology
8
5
3
0
2
0
0
0
18
Pathology and RACP (jointly)
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
Psychiatry
8
10
8
2
0
1
0
0
29
Public health medicine
3
2
4
0
3
0
0
0
12
Radiation oncology
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
3
Radiodiagnosis
7
0
1
4
1
0
0
0
13
Rehabilitation medicine
6
5
7
4
2
0
0
0
24
Sexual health medicine
2
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
4
Sport and exercise medicine
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
Surgery
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
3
Total
319
235
191
99
59
31
30
6
970

Discontinuation of Training

Trainees may discontinue training for a variety of reasons, with either the trainee officially withdrawing from the training program, or the college or training provider terminating or dismissing a trainee in accordance with college regulations or employment conditions.

In 2011, 115 advanced trainees discontinued training (Table 4.18). This is considerably less than in 2010 and more in line with the numbers in 2008 and 2009.

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Table 4.18: Advanced vocational trainee discontinuations by state/territory, 2007–2011

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

NSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
2007
15
13
5
6
6
1
1
1
79
2008
37
29
29
6
7
2
1
1
112
2009
40
36
28
7
15
2
0
1
130
2010
72
58
45
10
11
3
3
11
213
2011
42
31
22
8
6
3
3
0
115

Subspecialty Training

Pathology Subspecialties

In 2011, there were 487 advanced trainees undertaking training with the Royal College of Pathologists Australasia (RCPA) (Table 4.19). Half of these (242 or 49.7) were within the subspecialty of anatomical pathology and one quarter (136 or 27.9%) in haematology.

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Table 4.19: Pathology advanced trainees: Total, proportion of total and females by subspecialty, 2011

Source: RCPA

SubspecialtyTraineesProportion (%)Females
Anatomical pathology
242
49.7
143
Chemical pathology
19
3.9
9
Forensic pathology
7
1.4
6
General pathology
6
1.2
6
Genetics
5
1.0
2
Haematology
136
27.9
67
Immunology
27
5.5
10
Microbiology
45
9.2
25
Total
487
100
268

Table 4.20 shows the numbers of training positions in these subspecialties in each of the states and territories.

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Table 4.20: Pathology advanced trainees by subspecialty and state/territory, 2011

Source: RCPA

SubspecialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
Anatomical pathology
80
63
47
14
25
5
2
6
242
Chemical pathology
7
7
2
0
3
0
0
0
19
Forensic pathology
4
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
7
General pathology
1
0
4
0
0
1
0
0
6
Genetics
3
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
5
Haematology
42
47
24
11
8
1
1
2
136
Immunology
9
4
2
3
7
0
0
2
27
Microbiology
17
10
9
2
5
1
0
1
45
Oral pathology
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Total
163
133
89
31
49
8
3
11
487

Physician Adult Medicine Subspecialties

In 2011, there were 1,547 advanced physician trainees undertaking training with the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP) in adult medicine (Table 4.21).

Of all the subspecialties, general medicine and cardiology had the largest numbers of advanced trainees (199 and 185 respectively).

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Table 4.21: Physician adult medicine advanced trainees: Total, proportion and females by subspecialty, 2011

(a) This figure only covers those participating in the Adult Medicine stream.
(b) This figure does not necessarily indicate the number of advanced trainees, as trainees may be enrolled in more than one program (dual training) and will be counted in each.

Source: RACP

SubspecialtyTraineesProportion (%)Females
Cardiology
185
12.0
43
Clinical genetics
14
0.9
11
Clinical pharmacology
16
1.0
4
Endocrinology
112
7.2
73
Gastroenterology
112
7.2
37
General medicine
199
12.9
72
Geriatric medicine
137
8.9
70
Haematology
120
7.8
53
Immunology and allergy
37
2.4
20
Infectious diseases
64
4.1
25
Intensive care medicine
12
0.8
3
Medical oncology
137
8.9
68
Nephrology
92
5.9
43
Neurology
89
5.8
41
Nuclear medicine
16
1.0
4
Palliative medicine(a)
44
2.8
28
Respiratory and sleep medicine
124
8.0
47
Rheumatology
37
2.4
21
Total
(b)1,547
100
(b)663

Table 4.22 shows the numbers of training positions in these subspecialties in each of the states and territories.

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Table 4.22: Physician adult medicine advanced trainees by subspecialty and state/territory, 2011

(a) This figure does not necessarily indicate the number of advanced trainees, as trainees may be enrolled in more than one program (dual training) and will be counted in each.

Source: RACP

SubspecialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
Cardiology
62
47
37
17
14
3
1
4
185
Clinical genetics
11
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
14
Clinical pharmacology
3
4
2
6
1
0
0
0
16
Endocrinology
33
30
26
11
7
1
2
2
112
Gastroenterology
35
35
19
11
8
1
0
3
112
General medicine
29
54
56
28
20
6
4
2
199
Geriatric medicine
42
46
13
15
17
1
0
3
137
Haematology
39
48
16
6
8
0
0
3
120
Immunology and allergy
13
7
4
4
7
0
0
2
37
Infectious diseases
15
26
7
5
3
2
4
2
64
Intensive care medicine
1
4
1
3
2
0
0
1
12
Medical oncology
55
42
18
12
6
0
0
4
137
Nephrology
29
30
17
7
5
2
0
2
92
Neurology
32
34
11
5
5
1
0
1
89
Nuclear medicine
8
1
3
3
1
0
0
0
16
Palliative medicine
18
12
4
5
4
1
0
0
44
Respiratory and sleep medicine
40
36
23
11
10
1
0
3
124
Rheumatology
10
10
7
5
4
1
0
0
37
Total(a)
475
467
266
154
122
20
11
32
1,547

Physician Paediatric Subspecialties

In 2011, there were 640 advanced paediatric and child health trainees with the RACP’s Paediatric and Child Health Division (Table 4.23). Two thirds (406 or 63.4%) of these trainees were female. Just over half (347 or 54.2%) of all trainees were training in general paediatrics.

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Table 4.23: Physician paediatric and child health advanced trainees: Total, proportion of total and females by subspecialty, 2011(a)

(a) This figure does not necessarily indicate the number of advanced trainees, as trainees may be enrolled in more than one program (dual training) and will be counted in each.

Source: RACP

SubspecialtyTraineesProportion (%)Females
Cardiology
10
1.6
6
Clinical genetics
11
1.7
8
Clinical pharmacology
1
0.2
1
Community child health
45
7.0
42
Emergency medicine
na
na
na
Endocrinology
15
2.3
13
Gastroenterology
12
1.9
3
General paediatrics
347
54.2
228
Haematology
8
1.3
5
Immunology and allergy
9
1.4
6
Infectious diseases
6
0.9
3
Intensive care medicine
4
0.6
0
Medical oncology
14
2.2
8
Neonatal/ perinatal medicine
77
12.0
35
Nephrology
6
0.9
3
Neurology
17
2.7
9
Nuclear medicine
0
0
0
Paediatric emergency medicine
33
5.2
19
Palliative medicine
3
0.5
3
Respiratory and sleep medicine
20
3.1
13
Rheumatology
2
0.3
1
Total
(a)640
100
(a)406

Table 4.24 shows the numbers of training positions in these subspecialties in each of the states and territories.

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Table 4.24: Physician paediatric and child health advanced trainees by subspecialty and state/territory, 2011

(a) This figure does not necessarily indicate the number of advanced trainees, as trainees may be enrolled in more than one program (dual training) and will be counted in each.
(b) This figure only covers those participating in the Paediatric stream.

Source: RACP

SubspecialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
Cardiology
1
2
2
1
3
0
1
0
10
Clinical genetics
9
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
11
Clinical pharmacology
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
Community child health
20
15
6
0
4
0
0
0
45
Emergency medicine
na
na
na
na
na
na
na
na
na
Endocrinology
4
1
3
4
3
0
0
0
15
Gastroenterology
2
6
2
1
1
0
0
0
12
General paediatrics
120
81
66
30
36
3
9
2
347
Haematology
2
4
1
1
0
0
0
0
8
Immunology and allergy
4
3
1
0
1
0
0
0
9
Infectious diseases
2
2
0
0
1
0
1
0
6
Intensive care medicine
1
0
1
0
2
0
0
0
4
Medical oncology
7
3
1
2
1
0
0
0
14
Neonatal/perinatal medicine
24
18
12
8
12
1
0
2
77
Nephrology
1
2
1
1
1
0
0
0
6
Neurology
8
5
1
0
3
0
0
0
17
Nuclear medicine
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Paediatric emergency medicine
9
6
12
3
3
0
0
0
33
Palliative medicine(a)
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
Respiratory and sleep medicine
8
6
2
0
4
0
0
0
20
Rheumatology
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
2
Total(b)
225
156
113
51
76
4
11
4
640

Surgical Subspecialties

In 2011, there were 966 advanced surgical trainees undertaking training with the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) (Table 4.25). Of these, just under one quarter (230 or 23.8%) were female.

Of the nine subspecialties, general surgery and orthopaedic surgery had the highest numbers of trainees (371 and 208 respectively).

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Table 4.25: Surgical advanced trainees: Total, proportion of total and females by subspecialty(a), 2011

(a) RACS does not differentiate between basic and advanced surgical trainees, as the surgical program is an integrated program (SET).
(b) Total number of surgical trainees is 1,167, including 966 Australian, 180 New Zealand and 21 overseas.
(c) Total number of female surgical trainees is 285, including 230 Australian, 50 New Zealand and 5 overseas.

Source: RACS

SubspecialtyTraineesProportion (%)Females
Cardiothoracic surgery
31
3.2
3
General surgery
371
38.4
118
Neurosurgery
49
5.1
10
Orthopaedic surgery
208
21.5
17
Otolaryngology, head and neck surgery
80
8.3
28
Paediatric surgery
21
2.2
10
Plastic and reconstructive surgery
76
7.9
17
Urology
90
9.3
20
Vascular surgery
40
4.1
7
Total(a)
(b)966
100
(c)230

Table 4.26 shows the numbers of training positions in these subspecialties in each of the states and territories.

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Table 4.26: Surgical advanced trainees by subspecialty and state/territory, 2011

(a) RACS does not differentiate between basic and advanced surgical trainees, as the surgical program is an integrated program (SET).

Source: RACS

SubspecialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
Cardiothoracic surgery
12
10
4
2
2
1
0
0
31
General surgery
133
104
64
23
29
8
5
5
371
Neurosurgery
17
12
9
5
5
1
0
0
49
Orthopaedic surgery
73
47
37
18
22
4
1
6
208
Otolaryngology, head and neck surgery
27
21
14
7
9
0
1
1
80
Paediatric surgery
7
8
2
1
2
0
1
0
21
Plastic and reconstructive surgery
22
25
11
8
9
1
0
0
76
Urology
31
29
20
3
4
1
0
2
90
Vascular surgery
16
11
6
3
3
0
0
1
40
Total(a)
338
267
167
70
85
16
8
15
966

Trends in Advanced Vocational Training

The total number of advanced training positions/trainees was one and a half times greater in 2011 than in 2007 (Table 4.27). The proportion of female advanced trainees increased very slightly across the five years to its highest level of 50.1% in 2011. The number and proportion of part‑time advanced trainees, however, fluctuated from year to year, increasing to its highest level of 13.9% of all advanced trainees in 2011.

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Table 4.27: Vocational training positions/trainees: Total, advanced, female advanced and part-time advanced trainees, 2007–2011

(a) Training positions/trainees figures have been revised in 2010 from that reported in 2007.
(b) Advanced training positions/trainees figures have been revised in 2010 from that reported in 2008.

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

Total college traineesAdvanced training positions/ traineesFemale advanced traineesProportion female (%) Part-time advanced traineesProportion part-time (%)
2007(a)
10,100
6,833
3,181
46.6
739
10.8
2008(b)
11,668
7,324
3,421
46.7
556
7.6
2009
12,958
8,249
3,967
48.1
1,052
12.8
2010
14,679
9,432
4,494
47.6
971
10.3
2011
15,478
10,214
5,116
50.1
1416
13.9
Increase 2007–2011 (%)
53.2
49.5
60.8
7.6
91.6
28.4

Over the five years from 2007 to 2011, a number of medical colleges markedly increased training numbers (Table 4.28).

Emergency medicine, paediatrics and psychiatry showed the largest increases, more than doubling the number of advanced trainees between 2007 and 2011, with increases of 128.8%, 123.8% and 107.9% respectively.

Public health medicine and medical administration were the only specialties to not show an increase in total advanced trainees between 2007 and 2011.

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Table 4.28: Advanced training positions/trainees by medical specialty, 2007–2011

(a) Includes trainees based overseas.
(b) International medical graduates were included in trainee numbers from 2009.
(c) Includes advanced trainees years 5 and 6. Covers Australian trainees who are undertaking FRANZCOG training only and not OTS who are also undertaking RANZCOG advanced training as a requirement to obtain college fellowship.
(d) Includes 3rd and 4th years only, not 5th year.
(e) Includes 6 trainees who are completing their final year of training overseas.
(f) RACS does not differentiate between basic and advanced surgical trainees as the surgical program is an integrated program (SET).
(g) Total number of surgical trainees is 1,167, including 966 Australian, 180 New Zealand and 21 overseas.

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

Medical specialty20072008200920102011Increase 2007–2011 (%)
Addiction medicine
..
..
..
11
13
..
Adult medicine
(a)948
(a)1,043
(a)1,157
(a)1,406
1,469
55.0
Anaesthesia
416
463
485
612
566
36.1
Anaesthesia – Pain medicine
49
45
53
51
58
18.4
Dermatology
31
33
39
45
54
74.2
Emergency medicine
– ACEM(b)
462
480
811
881
1,057
128.8
– RACP
..
..
..
..
33
..
General practice
– GPET
2,003
2,162
2,309
2,572
2,948
47.2
– ACRRM
..
..
..
70
6
..
Intensive care
285
326
375
332
312
9.5
Medical administration
86
80
92
105
86
0
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
(c)101
(c)109
(c)131
(c)123
143
41.6
Occupational and Environmental medicine
59
61
55
87
80
35.6
Ophthalmology
47
70
77
(d)49
(e)86
83.0
Paediatrics
286
395
453
583
640
123.8
Palliative medicine
..
..
..
58
71
..
Pathology
176
211
224
301
314
78.4
Pathology and RACP (jointly)
95
124
137
131
173
82.1
Psychiatry
177
278
322
350
368
107.9
Public health medicine
75
75
61
60
72
-4.0
Radiation oncology
96
104
101
110
137
42.7
Radiodiagnosis
299
314
328
333
366
22.4
Rehabilitation medicine
131
121
138
143
162
23.7
Sexual health medicine
..
..
..
19
7
..
Sport and exercise medicine
..
..
..
..
27
..
Surgery(f)[
774
791
901
1,000
(g)966
24.8
Total
6,833
7,324
9,150
9,432
10,214
49.5

Advanced vocational training activity increased markedly in all states from 2007 to 2011 (Table 4.29).

The number of advanced trainees/positions in the Northern Territory and the Australian Capital Territory also increased, but showed considerable fluctuations across the five years. However, it should be noted that this data gives a distorted picture of the true increase in training in the Australian Capital Territory, as data for some specialties were reported with that for New South Wales previously and general practice numbers continue to be reported together.

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Table 4.29: Advanced training positions/trainees by state/territory, 2007–2011

(a) Australian total differs from the sum of state/territory totals in some years because it includes trainees in overseas placements.

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

NSWVicQldSAWATasNTACT(a)Aust
2007
2,312
1,831
1,220
525
619
121
101
107
6,833
2008
2,486
2,040
1,351
599
689
147
120
129
7,581
2009
2,727
2,190
1,486
623
722
156
130
122
8,249
2010
3,033
2,448
1,780
740
700
170
176
252
9,277
2011
3,314
2,596
2,042
852
912
207
151
139
10,194
Increase 007–2011 (%)
43.3
41.8
67.4
62.3
47.3
71.1
49.5
29.9
49.2

Overall, the proportion of advanced vocational trainees who were female changed little over the five years from 2007 to 2011, remaining at just under half of all advanced vocational trainees (Table 4.30).

The proportion of female advanced trainees has fluctuated over the years in most specialities, particularly those with smaller numbers of trainees. In spite of this variation, there are a number of specialities that have had consistently lesser proportions of female trainees, such as surgery, occupational and environmental medicine, and intensive care. In contrast, general practice, paediatrics, obstetrics and gynaecology, and rehabilitation medicine have maintained higher proportions (around three-fifths each year) of female advanced trainees.

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Table 4.30: Proportion of female advanced vocational trainees by medical specialty, 2007–2011

(a) The proportion is calculated for Pathology medical specialty only. The percentage for both Pathology and Pathology and RACP (jointly) is 53.4%.
(b) Proportion of Australian surgical trainees. The total proportion of female surgical trainees including Australian, New Zealand and overseas is 24.4%.

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

Medical specialty20072008200920102011Increase 007–2011 (%)
Proportion female (%)
Addiction medicine
..
..
..
36.4
30.8
..
Adult medicine
43.0
43.1
40.2
42.3
43.0
0
Anaesthesia
39.7
37.1
50.7
39.9
43.1
8.6
Anaesthesia – Pain medicine
26.5
31.1
35.8
29.4
27.6
4.1
Dermatology
51.6
66.7
59.0
55.6
61.1
18.4
Emergency medicine
44.2
43.5
41.9
38.6
41.1
-7.1
General practice
58.9
62.0
63.8
64.9
..
– GPET
..
..
..
..
65.8
..
– ACRRM
..
..
..
..
33.3
..
Intensive care
34.7
24.5
24.3
27.1
26.9
-22.4
Medical administration
20.9
10.0
14.1
27.6
41.9
100.3
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
65.7
68.8
67.9
65.0
60.1
-8.5
Occupational and Environmental medicine
23.7
16.4
25.5
14.9
21.3
-10.3
Ophthalmology
31.9
34.3
31.2
38.8
38.4
20.3
Paediatrics
63.6
60.1
58.7
61.4
65.9
3.7
Palliative medicine
..
..
..
53.4
63.8
..
Pathology
53.9
45.3
64.5
(a)80.1
59.2
9.9
Pathology and RACP (jointly)
..
..
..
..
47.4
..
Psychiatry
52.5
26.3
53.1
55.1
63.0
20.1
Public health medicine
69.3
26.3
59.0
61.7
52.8
-23.8
Radiation oncology
44.8
52.9
57.4
58.2
51.8
15.7
Radiodiagnosis
30.4
30.9
34.8
31.8
31.4
3.4
Rehabilitation medicine
60.3
60.3
61.6
61.5
64.8
7.5
Sexual health medicine
..
..
..
52.6
28.6
..
Sport and exercise medicine
..
..
..
..
22.2
..
Surgery
18.3
23.3
23.1
22.8
(b)23.8
..
Total (%)
46.6
45.1
48.1
47.6
49.9
7.1
Total female trainees
3,181
3,421
3,967
4,494
5,116
60.8

Overall the proportion of female advanced trainees remained fairly constant across states, roughly in the range of 40% to 50% each year. However, the proportion of female trainees has been higher each year in the Northern Territory (ranging from 59.2% to 61.6%) and generally considerably lower in the Australian Capital Territory (Table 4.31).

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Table 4.31: Proportion of female advanced trainees by state/territory, 2007–2011

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

NSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
Proportion female (%)
200747.547.545.243.646.043.860.430.846.6
200846.345.044.344.942.746.959.233.345.1
200939.249.446.247.245.248.760.042.648.1
201050.048.846.146.448.957.652.340.147.6
201153.849.947.348.247.351.261.634.550.2

The number of part-time advanced trainees was markedly higher in 2011 than in the previous four years (Table 4.32). Considerable variability in reported numbers of part-time advanced trainees from year to year makes it difficult to distinguish any discernible trends in part-time training. Considerable fluctuations are also seen within specialties between 2007 and 2011.

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Table 4.32: Advanced trainees undertaking part-time training by medical specialty, 2007–2011

(a) These numbers include trainees within the joint RACP and RCPA program and trainees based overseas.
(b) 2010 data is year to date of posts credentialed. Numbers reflects trainees who have undertaken part-time training at any time during the first half of the year.This does not mean they have been in part-time training for the whole year.
(c) RACS does not differentiate between basic and advanced surgical trainees as the surgical program is an integrated program (SET).
(d) Totals for 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010 have been changed to include numbers of trainees for Sport and Exercise Medicine.

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

Medical specialty20072008200920102011
Addiction medicine
2
2
6
5
3
Adult medicine(a)
46
29
51
59
63
Anaesthesia
6
32
21
24
25
Anaesthesia – Pain medicine
5
3
7
6
6
Dermatology
2
2
1
5
2
Emergency medicine
– ACEM(b)
37
93
na
23
36
– RACP
8
General practice
453
364
743
631
– GPET
991
– ACRRM
0
Intensive care
3
0
2
1
3
Medical administration
0
1
1
1
5
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
17
7
25
3
7
Occupational and Environmental medicine
0
0
0
0
0
Ophthalmology
0
1
2
1
0
Paediatrics(a)
62
9
70
76
154
Palliative medicine
9
6
16
6
2
Pathology
4
17
1
11
18
Pathology and RACP (jointly)
1
Psychiatry
24
57
60
64
29
Public health medicine
27
15
17
11
17
Radiation oncology
0
0
1
4
2
Radiodiagnosis
2
4
5
7
13
Rehabilitation medicine
15
11
17
26
24
Sexual health medicine
4
3
7
11
4
Sport and exercise medicine
2
1
1
1
0
Surgery(c)
2
4
0
1
3
Total(d)
722
661
1,054
977
1,416

General Practice

General practitioners’ training under the Australian General Practice Training (AGPT) Program is provided through 20 regional training providers. Data from these are presented in Table 4.33. In total there were 2,948 trainees undertaking general practice training in 2011. Of these, 918 or 31.1% were in their first year of a three or four year full-time program.

Two thirds (66.6%) of all general practice trainees were female.

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Table 4.33: General practice trainees: Registrars, first-year registrars and female registrars by state/territory and training consortium, 2011(a)

(a) At the beginning of 2011 GPET undertook a major information management system upgrade with a new training records system and data warehouse.
(b) Registrars who transferred during 2011 will be counted against each regional training provider but only once in the total.

Source: GPET

Regional training providerRegistrarsProportion registrars (%)First-year registrarsFemale registrarsProportion female (%)
New South Wales and Australian Capital Territory
CoastCityCountry Training Inc
215
21.4
65
127
59.1
Beyond Medical Education (NSW)
90
9.0
32
56
62.2
General Practice Training –
Valley to Coast
166
16.5
47
118
71.1
North Coast NSW General Practice Training Ltd
98
9.8
34
63
64.3
GP Synergy
316
31.4
100
214
67.7
WentWest Ltd
120
11.9
41
119
99.2
Total NSW and ACT
1,005
319
697
69.4
Victoria
Bogong Regional Training Network
82
12.7
26
38
46.3
Greater Green Triangle GP Education and Training Inc
65
10.1
24
38
58.5
Beyond Medical Education (VIC)
105
16.3
31
60
57.1
Victorian Metropolitan Alliance
309
47.8
90
220
71.2
getGP Ltd
85
13.2
32
47
55.3
Total Victoria
646
203
403
62.4
Queensland
Central and Southern Qld Train
334
51.6
105
228
68.3
Queensland Rural Medical Education
138
21.3
43
70
50.7
Tropical Medical Training
175
27.0
51
108
61.7
Total Queensland
647
199
406
62.8
South Australia
Adelaide to Outback
Training Program
133
54.3
36
88
66.2
Sturt-Fleurieu General Practice Education and Training
112
45.7
35
76
67.9
Total South Australia
245
71
164
66.9
Western Australia
WAGPET Ltd
256
100.0
86
179
69.9
Total Western Australia
256
86
179
69.9
Tasmania
General Practice Training Tasmania
95
100.0
27
67
70.5
Total Tasmania
95
27
67
70.5
Northern Territory
Northern Territory General Practice Education Ltd
78
100.0
13
46
59.0
Total Northern Territory
78
13
46
59.0
Australia(b)
2,948
918
1,962
66.6

Rural Pathway

In 2011, there were 1,372 trainees completing general practice training through the rural pathway.

The proportion training through this pathway was slightly higher in Queensland (than the relative proportion of the population) and slightly less in Western Australia, New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory (Table 4.34).

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Table 4.34: General practice rural pathway trainees by state/territory, 2011

(a) At the beginning of 2011 GPET undertook a major information management system upgrade with a new training records system and data warehouse.
(b) Registrars who transferred during 2011 will be counted against each regional training provider but only once in the total.

Source: GPET

NSW/ACTVicQldSAWATasNTAust
Number(a)
373
334
333
121
107
59
55
(b)1,372
Proportion (%)
27.2
24.3
24.3
8.8
7.8
4.3
4.0
100.0