Medical Training Review Panel: fifteenth report

Appendix B: Medical College Training Requirements

Page last updated: 15 March 2012

Medical College Training Requirements

Appendix B provides summary information about each medical college’s training requirements.

The training requirements for vocational trainees vary between colleges. Tables B1 to B3 provide a consolidated summary of the length of vocational training and training program entry requirements, as well as the guidelines for part-time training and interrupted training.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information contained in this appendix is correct at the time of publication and relevant for the data period that the report covers. However, these requirements change over time, and information should be checked with the relevant college or training organisation if current information is required. Website contact details for each college or training organisation are provided in the summaries for the colleges below.

In order to improve general understanding of medical college training requirements, the MTRP has decided to use common language in describing each college training program. Accordingly, the descriptors used in this summary may vary from the information provided by the individual college, faculty or vocational training organisation.

Consolidated Summary Tables

Table B1: Summary of specialty training requirements and entry time, 2010

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

College/Faculty/Training organisationTraining requirements
Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA)5 years full-time (2 years basic, 3 years advanced)

Can enter after completing PGY1, but may not accredit any training time until completion of PGY2

Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

– Faculty of Pain Medicine (ANZCA-FPM)

1–3 years full-time, depending on prior specialist training and experience

1–2 years of structured training in Faculty Accredited Unit
full-time equivalent

1 elective year full-time equivalent

Can enter during specialty training

Australasian College of Dermatologists (ACD)

4 years full-time – trainees who do not pass both written and clinical fellowship examinations and satisfy all other training requirements in their fourth year may be invited to undertake a fifth year of training, subject to the availability of training positions and the discretion of the Board of Training

Can enter after completing PGY1 and PGY2

Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (ACEM)2 years basic training full-time (which can comprise PGY1 and PGY2)

1 year provisional training full-time equivalent

4 years advanced training full-time equivalent

Australasian College of Sports Physicians (ACSP)3 years basic training full-time (PGY1, PGY2, PGY3 to be completed prior to entering the college program)

4 years advanced training full-time equivalent

Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP)3 years full-time

Optional 4th year for Advanced Skills training and for
academic post

May apply in PGY1 and can enter after completing PGY2

College of Intensive Care Medicine of Australia and New Zealand (CICM)3 years basic training full-time

3 years advanced training full-time

Can enter after completing PGY1

Joint Training Program in Intensive Care Medicine

– College of Intensive Care Medicine of Australia and New Zealand (CICM) and Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP)

3 years basic training full-time and assessments (including written and clinical examinations)

3 years advanced training full-time

Can enter after completing PGY1

Royal Australasian College of Medical Administrators (RACMA)3 years full-time

Can enter after 3 years clinical experience

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG)6 years full-time

Years 1–4 in the Integrated Training Program

Years 5–6 in the Elective Program

Can enter after completing PGY1

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists (RANZCO)5 years full-time

Can enter after completing PGY2

Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA)5 years full-time

Can enter after completing PGY1

Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Adult Medicine (RACP-AM)

3 years basic training full-time and assessments (including written and clinical examinations)

3 or more years advanced training full-time

Can enter after completing PGY1

Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Paediatrics and Child Health (RACP-PCH)

3 years basic training full-time and assessments (including written and clinical examinations)

3 or more years advanced training full-time

Can enter after completing PGY1

Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Australasian Faculty of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
(RACP-AFOEM)

4 years full-time (approximately)

Can enter after completing 2 years general clinical experience

Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Australasian Faculty of Public Health Medicine (RACP-AFPHM)

3 years full-time

Can enter after completing at least 3 years of postgraduate medical experience and completion of, or enrolment in, a Masters of Public Health Medicine (or comparable degree), which includes the faculty’s core discipline areas

Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Australasian Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine (RACP-AFRM)

Adult Rehabilitation Medicine
4 years full-time

Can enter after completing PGY2

Paediatric Rehabilitation Medicine
3 years basic training full-time (with the Faculty of RACP PCH)

3 years advanced training full-time

Can enter after completing PGY1

Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Chapter of Palliative Medicine

3 years full-time

Can enter with fellowship of a faculty or college approved by the Chapter or completion of FRACP basic training, including written and clinical examinations

Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Chapter of Addiction Medicine

3 years full-time

Can enter with fellowship of a faculty or college approved by the Chapter or completion of FRACP basic training, including written and clinical examinations

Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Chapter of Sexual Health Medicine

3 years full-time

Can enter with fellowship of a faculty or college approved by the Chapter or completion of FRACP basic training, including written and clinical examinations

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP)5 years full-time, which comprises 3 years basic training and 2 years advanced training

Optional additional advanced training certificate programs in addiction, adult, child and adolescent, consultation-liaison, old age, psychotherapy and forensic psychiatry

Can enter after completing PGY1

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists

– Radiodiagnosis (RANZCR)

5 years full-time

Can enter after completing PGY1 and PGY2 years

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists

– Faculty of Radiation Oncology (RANZCR-FRO)

5 years full-time

Can enter after completing PGY1 and PGY2 years

Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM)4 years full-time Can enter after completing PGY1
Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS)5–6 years full-time

Can apply from PGY2 to commence in PGY3

Surgical Education and Training (SET) occurs in nine specialty areas:

– Cardiothoracic surgery – 6 years full-time
– General surgery – 5 years full-time
– Neurosurgery – 6 years full-time including 1 year of full-time research
– Orthopaedic surgery – 5 years full-time
– Otolaryngology Head and Neck surgery – 5 years full-time
– Paediatric surgery – 6 years full-time
– Plastic and Reconstructive surgery – 5 years full‑time
– Urology – 6 years full-time
– Vascular surgery – 5 years full-time

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Table B2: Summary of specialty part-time training requirements, 2010

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

College/Faculty/Training organisationRequirements for part-time training
Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists and Faculty of Pain MedicineMinimum 50% of full-time commitment

Must result in FTE time

Australasian College of Dermatologists Minimum 50% of full-time commitment

Must result in FTE time

Australasian College for Emergency MedicineMinimum 50% of full-time commitment

Must result in FTE time

Australasian College of Sports PhysiciansConsidered on an individual basis

Must result in FTE time

Completion must be within 10 years of commencement

Royal Australian College of General PractitionersApproval on a case-by-case basis

Approval provided by regional training providers

College of Intensive Care Medicine of Australia and New Zealand (CICM)Minimum 20% of full-time commitment

Must result in FTE time

Joint Training Program in Intensive Care Medicine

– College of Intensive Care Medicine of Australia and New Zealand (CICM) and Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP)

Minimum 20% of full-time commitment

Must result in FTE time

Royal Australasian College of Medical AdministratorsMust result in FTE time

Complete within 6 years

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and GynaecologistsMinimum 50% of full-time commitment

First year of training must be full-time

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of OphthalmologistsApproved on a case-by-case basis
Royal College of Pathologists of AustralasiaMinimum 8 hours per week/20% of full-time commitment
Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Adult Medicine Division

Part-time training is possible, provided Basic and Advanced Training are completed within the required time limit.
Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Paediatrics and Child Health

Part-time training is possible, provided Basic and Advanced Training are completed within the required time limit
Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Australasian Faculty of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

Minimum 50% of full-time commitment

Must result in FTE time

Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Australasian Faculty of Public Health Medicine

Minimum 20% of full-time commitment

Must result in FTE time

Training must be completed within 7 years

Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Australasian Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine

Minimum 50% of full-time commitment

Must result in FTE time

Complete within 8 years

Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Chapter of Palliative Medicine

Minimum 20% of full-time commitment

Complete within 7 years with a minimum average of 0.5 FTE

Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Chapter of Addiction Medicine

Minimum 50% of full-time commitment

Complete within 7 years

Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Chapter of Sexual Health Medicine

Minimum 20% of full-time commitment

Complete within 7 years

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of PsychiatristsMinimum 50% of full-time commitment, although in rare instances part time training at less than 50% of full-time commitment may be approved for Advanced Training
post-Fellowship

Must result in FTE time

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists

– Radiodiagnosis

Minimum 50% of full-time commitment

Must result in minimum of 0.5 FTE time

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists

– Faculty of Radiation Oncology

Minimum 50% of full-time commitment

Must result in minimum of 0.4 FTE time

Australian College of Rural and Remote MedicineMinimum 50% of full-time commitment

Approval provided by training providers

Royal Australasian College of SurgeonsTrainees on a SET Program who wish to apply for part-time training must apply to the relevant Specialty Board at least 6 months prior to the proposed commencement of the part-time training

The overall duration of the training program must not exceed the published expected minimum duration of training plus 4 years

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Table B3: Summary of specialty interrupted training requirements, 2010

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

College/Faculty/Training organisationRequirements for interrupted training
Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists and Faculty of Pain MedicineConsidered on an individual basis
Australasian College of Dermatologists Considered on an individual basis
Australasian College for Emergency MedicineAllowed up to 2 years and possibly beyond this, depending upon circumstances
Australasian College of Sports PhysiciansConsidered on an individual basis
General Practice Education and Training

– Royal Australian College of General Practitioners

– Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine

Allowed up to a maximum of 2 years
College of Intensive Care Medicine of Australia and New Zealand (CICM)Allowed

Advanced training must include at least 2 years interrupted only by normal holiday or short term (eg. study, conference) leave

If training is interrupted for between 1 and 2 years, there must be a minimum of 1 core advanced training year as part of subsequent training

If training is interrupted for between 2 and 4 years, 2 advanced training years, including one core year must be completed as part of subsequent training

If training is interrupted for 4 years or more, 2 core training years must be completed as part of subsequent training

Joint Training Program in Intensive Care Medicine

– College of Intensive Care Medicine and Royal Australasian College of Physicians

Allowed

Advanced training can include at least 2 years interrupted only by normal holiday or short term (eg. study, conference) leave

If training is interrupted for between 1 and 2 years, there must be a minimum of 1 core advanced training year as part of subsequent training

If training is interrupted for between 2 and 4 years, 2 advanced training years, including one core year must be completed as part of subsequent training

If training is interrupted for 4 years or more, 2 core training years must be completed as part of subsequent training

Royal Australasian College of Medical AdministratorsAllowed
Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and GynaecologistsAllowed up to 2 years without loss of credit for previous training

Training must be completed within 11 years

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of OphthalmologistsConsidered on an individual basis
Royal College of Pathologists of AustralasiaAllowed – no limit is placed on the time taken to complete training, but if the final Part II examination has not been passed within 5 years of passing the Part I examination then the Part I examination must be sat and passed again
Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Adult Medicine Division

Allowed
Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Paediatrics and Child Health

Allowed
Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Australasian Faculty of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

Considered on an individual basis, but usually no more than 2 years
Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Australasian Faculty of Public Health Medicine

Allowed up to 1 year deferral at a time, with a maximum of 2 years deferment

Training must be completed within 7 years

Deferral from training due to maternity/paternity leave is not included in the 7 year limit for completion of training

Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Australasian Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine

Allowed up to 2 years

Training must be completed within 6 years (8 years for part-time trainees)

Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Chapter of Palliative Medicine

Allowed up to 2 years in one continuous period
Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Chapter of Addiction Medicine

Allowed up to 2 years in one continuous period
Royal Australasian College of Physicians

– Chapter of Sexual Health Medicine

Allowed up to 2 years in one continuous period
Royal Australian and New Zealand College of PsychiatristsAllowed

Basic Training must be completed within 8 years or may need to repeat or complete the training experiences lapsed

Advanced Training must be completed within 6 years or may result in review of overall training and assessment

Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists

– Radiodiagnosis

Allowed
Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists

– Faculty of Radiation Oncology

Allowed
Royal Australasian College of Surgeons

With the exception of leave for medical or family reasons, trainees cannot apply for leave in the first 6 months of their training program

Trainees on a SET Program who wish to interrupt their training must apply to the relevant Specialty Board at least 6 months prior to the proposed commencement of the training year in which the interruption will commence

Trainees applying for interruption due to medical reasons may do so at any time if supported by medical evidence

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Training Program Information

The series of brief summaries of the training requirements and processes for each of the specialist colleges are provided below. Each summary provides descriptions of the following:

  • training programs;
  • trainee selection processes and criteria;
  • trainees assessment methods;
  • overseas trained specialist (OTS) assessment processes; and
  • accreditation processes where relevant.

Any further information or clarification should be sought directly from the relevant college.

Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

Training Program

The Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) approved training sequence encompasses an initial two-year prevocational medical education and training period and the five-year period of ANZCA approved training, which consists of two years basic training and three years advanced training. In the course of ANZCA approved training, trainees are required to successfully complete:

  • five years of supervised clinical training at approved training sites;
  • both the primary and final examinations;
  • a program of 12 modules; and
  • an Effective Management of Anaesthetic Crises (EMAC) or Early Management of Severe Trauma (EMST) course or equivalent.

The training program provides for part-time training. The minimum trainee commitment must be 50% of that of a full-time trainee. There is provision for interrupted training. Some overseas training may be recognised during both basic and advanced training, subject to prior approval by the college assessor.

Trainee Selection

ANZCA’s Guidelines for the Selection of Trainees outlines the principles that should be used in selecting trainees for appointment to hospitals approved for training for the diploma of fellowship of ANZCA.

Trainees are trained and educated in approved hospital departments, which must be part of an approved rotation, according to the ANZCA guidelines and policies, and under the supervision of the ANZCA. It should be noted that the hospital is the employing authority, not the ANZCA, and the hospital makes the appointments using a process as outlined by these guidelines. However, the selection committee should include at least one ANZCA representative approved by the relevant regional/national committee. Trainees are not re‑selected into advanced training by the ANZCA.

Trainee Assessment

In-Training Assessment (ITA) is carried out at least every 6 months, and requires the trainee and the supervisor of training to carry out a regular process of evaluation, recording goals set and areas identified for improvement. Each trainee must maintain a learning portfolio, which should include formal documents relating to training, including the ITA forms, the trainee’s self evaluation of performance forms, as well as voluntary documentation, such as a logbook.

The primary examination covers physiology, including clinical measurement, and pharmacology, including statistics. Trainees may sit one or both subjects at any sitting. There is no limit on the number of attempts but progress beyond the second year of training requires a pass in both subjects. Trainees progress to the oral section when they have attained a satisfactory score in the written section. The final examination consists of written and oral sections, and may be taken after three years of approved training.

Admission to fellowship is available to trainees who have successfully completed five years of training, passed both examinations, and completed all other training requirements.

International Medical Graduate Specialists

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The international medical graduate specialist (IMGS) assessment process is conducted by ANZCA to assess and make a determination regarding the comparability of the IMGS to a fellow of ANZCA.

The ANZCA IMGS assessment process commences with application via the Australian Medical Council (AMC) and proceeds to a paper‑based assessment to establish qualifications, training, clinical experience, recency of practice, health systems worked in, and participation in continuing professional development (CPD). Area of Need applicants are also assessed for comparability, as required.

If eligible to proceed, the assessment then includes:

  • a face-to-face assessment interview;
  • a clinical practice assessment period; and
  • either a workplace-based assessment or the choice of the IMGS performance assessment or the final examination.

IMGS applicants need to provide evidence of their specialist anaesthesia training in relation to duration, structure, content, curriculum, sub-specialty experience, supervision and assessment. The ANZCA IMGS assessment process will take into account the college’s training requirements at the time the applicant attained his/her initial post-graduate specialist qualification in anaesthesia.

In relation to the specialist qualification, consideration will be given to the curriculum vitae, references, and details of practice as a specialist anaesthetist. Experience and qualifications must be substantiated by statements and original or certified copies of diplomas from relevant bodies.

Assessment of the specialist’s experience takes into account case mix, use of equipment and drugs and compliance with standards of anaesthesia practice as promoted in the college professional documents. Evidence of participation in CPD is sought, comparable to the college’s continuing CPD program. Continuous involvement in recent years is particularly important.

Accreditation

Accredited hospitals are reviewed according to a seven-year cycle. Where possible, an entire rotation or training scheme is reviewed at the same time. Sometimes it is necessary to visit individual hospitals in between the seven-year rotational reviews. This is usually a result of major staffing or structural changes within the hospital, or a particular concern raised by the hospital, the trainees, the regional/national committee or other parties.

The college approves departments as a whole as being suitable for training. It does not approve a particular number of posts. The number of trainees is decided by the hospital.

Hospitals are normally approved for both basic and advanced training. That is, they may take trainees in any of the five years of training. Under very rare circumstances, a hospital may be approved for advanced training only.

Hospitals may also be approved for the potential to offer a provisional fellowship program. This is normally in addition to approval for basic and advanced training,

but some hospitals may be deemed suitable for provisional fellowship training only. Trainees wishing to be appointed as provisional fellows must seek prospective approval from the college assessor.

Further Information

Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA)

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Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists – Faculty of Pain Medicine

Training Program

The fellowship of the Faculty of Pain Medicine – ANZCA (ANZCA-FPM) is an ‘add-on’ specialist diploma. Those wishing to enter the field usually will either have, or be training toward, a specialist qualification in one of the participating specialties - anaesthesia, medicine, surgery, psychiatry or rehabilitation medicine.

The ANZCA-FPM training requirements vary from one to three years, depending on the primary specialist qualification, previous experience and exposure to pain medicine. Training may commence during, and may be concurrent with, training programs for the diploma of fellowship of the participating bodies, including ANZCA, RACS, RACP, RANZCP and AFRM-RACP.

Trainees must undertake a prospectively approved structured training period of one or two years in a Faculty accredited pain medicine program. One further year of additional approved experience of direct relevance to pain medicine is required. There is some provision for retrospective approval by the Assessor of prior experience and training.

The training program provides for part-time training. The minimum trainee commitment must be 0.5 full-time equivalent. There is provision for interrupted training.

It is a requirement of the training program that all trainees receive training and experience in the broad areas of acute, chronic and cancer pain. Trainees are provided with a trainee support kit that includes the objectives of training and focused resources. The objectives of training set out in detail the aims of education and training. The objectives divide into four main sections: socio-biology of pain and neurobiology of pain as ‘basic’ knowledge; and principles of pain medicine and practice of pain medicine as ‘clinical’ knowledge.

Trainee Selection

Employers place advertisements for positions in pain medicine training units accredited by the FPM. Interview, selection and appointment processes are determined by the employing jurisdictions, with representation from the FPM.

Trainee Assessment

Formative assessment includes the logbook that documents workload and experience recorded over a period of six months. This acts as a tool for supervisors of training to direct trainees to rectify any gaps in exposure to the required areas. Quarterly In-Training Assessments (ITA) requires the trainee and the supervisor of training to carry out a regular evaluation, with a recording of goals being met and areas identified for improvement. Summative assessment includes the final ITA, a case report and an examination.

The Faculty examination format comprises a written paper, an observed clinical long case, short cases and a viva voce. Candidates must achieve a mark of at least 50%. Trainees may present for the annual examination during or after the mandatory structured training period in a Faculty accredited unit.

Admission to fellowship is available to candidates who are fellows of ANZCA, RACP, RACS, RANZCP, AFRM – RACP, RACGP, RNZCGP, RANZCOG, or who hold an Australian or New Zealand specialist qualification acceptable to the Board, and who have successfully completed the training period prescribed by the Assessor, passed the examination and completed all other training requirements.

International Medical Graduate Specialists

Assessment of International Medical Graduate Specialists (IMGS) and Area of Need specialists is undertaken according to ANZCA policy. However there is no entirely equivalent training in multidisciplinary pain medicine, as no other country has a governing body in pain medicine representing the five specialties in the ANZCA-FPM.

Associate Fellowship of the FPM is available to candidates who are recognised in their country of practice as medical specialists in anaesthesia, medicine, surgery, psychiatry or rehabilitation medicine or who hold a specialist qualification in their country of practice acceptable to the FPM Board and who have successfully completed the training period prescribed by the assessor, passed the examination and completed all other training requirements.

An Associate Fellow may be admitted to Fellowship of the Faculty of Pain Medicine upon conferral of fellowship of a Medical College in Australia or New Zealand acceptable to the Board.

Accreditation

The Faculty accredits multidisciplinary pain medicine units that include practitioners from at least three relevant medical specialties and from relevant allied health professions. Comprehensive policies and criteria have been developed by the Faculty requiring a specified standard for facilities and adequate supervision by pain medicine specialists. Units seeking accreditation are required to complete a detailed questionnaire and undergo an accreditation visit. During the accreditation process, significant weighting is given to the feedback provided during structured interviews with the trainees who are based at the unit.

Further Information

 Faculty of Pain Medicine

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Australasian College of Dermatologists

Training Program

The college supervises a four-year vocational training program, which consists of supervised clinics in all aspects of dermatology including dermatological medicine and procedural dermatology.

Trainees pass through two defined stages during their training. These stages are designed to facilitate the progressive and cumulative acquisition of knowledge and skills. Basic training must be completed satisfactorily before the trainee can move to advanced training.

Basic Training

The purpose of basic training (years one and two) is to build on existing skills so that trainees acquire broad knowledge of the theory and practice of dermatological medicine and the basic sciences underpinning them. It is designed to give the trainee a sound base from which to further develop their skills in later years of the program.

Advanced Training

During advanced training (years three and four) trainees acquire skills in the treatment of more complex dermatological conditions and are given increased responsibility for patient management.

Trainees are required to prepare and have published two papers of a significant nature on a dermatological subject. At least one of these papers must be published in The Australasian Journal of Dermatology (AJD) and the other may be published in another peer-reviewed journal. They must also present at least two papers, one of which must be presented at the Registrars’ Forum or other session of the Australasian College of Dermatologists (ACD) Annual Scientific Meeting. The second may be presented at the ACD Annual Scientific Meeting or the Australasian Dermatopathology Society conference or the Australasian Society of Dermatology Research meeting or another meeting of similar stature that has been approved in advance by the board of censors.

Trainee Selection

Entry into the training program requires completion of PGY1 or PGY2.

Trainee Assessment

Trainees pass through two defined stages in their training. These stages are designed to facilitate the progressive and cumulative acquisition of knowledge and skills. Basic training must be completed satisfactorily before the trainee can progress to advanced training.

Basic Training

To be eligible to proceed to advanced training trainees must pass the clinical sciences self-paced online modules and the pharmacology examination within the first 18 months of training and perform satisfactorily in the workplace.

Advanced Training

Trainees are eligible to apply to sit the fellowship examinations in their fourth year of training. These examinations consist of the following:

  • written papers in dermatological medicine, procedural dermatology and clinical pharmacology;
  • objective structured clinical examinations in procedural dermatology and laboratory dermatology; and
  • clinical vivas in dermatological medicine.

Trainees who do not satisfy all the requirements of the training program, including passing both the written and clinical fellowship examinations in their fourth year of training, may be invited to complete an additional year of supervised training. This training may be undertaken in an accredited training position, a supervised private practice setting or a combination of both. Approval of a fifth year of training is subject to the availability of training positions and is at the discretion of the Board of Training.

In addition to the examinations described above, trainees undertake regular summative in-training assessments (SITAs) throughout the full duration of their training. Trainees are also required to successfully complete a series of assessments known as ProDAs (Procedural Dermatology Assessments) and DermCEXs (Dermatology Clinical Evaluation Exercise). Through these three assessment methods, along with the college’s formal examinations, trainees must be assessed as competent to independently perform all essential procedures and treatment modalities as described in the Training Program Handbook.

International Medical Graduate Specialists

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International Medical Graduate (IMG) applicants are assessed against the standards expected of recently trained Australian dermatologists, making allowance for the number of years since graduation in determining comparability.

Applicants must submit all application material to the Australian Medical Council (AMC). The college assesses applications on behalf of the AMC. The ACD IMG Assessment Committee undertakes an initial assessment of the applicant based on their submitted documentation.

There are three potential initial assessment outcomes:

  • Applicant is not comparable: the applicant is not substantially comparable to an Australian-trained dermatologist and could not obtain equivalence with further supervised clinical training in Australia within a maximum period of two years.
  • Applicant is partially comparable: the applicant is not substantially comparable to an Australian-trained dermatologist but may be able to obtain substantial comparability with further specific supervised clinical training in Australia within a maximum period of two years.
  • Applicant is substantially comparable: the applicant is substantially comparable to an Australian-trained dermatologist and is recommended for acceptance to practise as a dermatologist in Australia.

An interview may be required to confirm the assessment. The committee undertakes structured interviews four times per year that include resume-specific questions, clinical scenario questions and competency-based questions. The interview allows the committee to make a final assessment recommendation including the specific nature of any additional training and or assessment required. Full details of assessment criteria and processes are available on the college website.

Accreditation

The college does not accredit training facilities; instead individual training positions are accredited. All positions are regularly inspected to ensure that they continue to meet the college’s accreditation requirements. These requirements are available on the college website.

Further Information

Australasian College of Dermatologists

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Australasian College for Emergency Medicine

Training Program

Basic and provisional

Basic training comprises PGY1 and PGY2. The aim is to gain a broad range of experience and the acquisition of basic skills in medicine through a variety of hospital and associated posts.

Provisional training becomes more specified to emergency medicine skills. Requirements include:

  • a compulsory six-month term in emergency medicine;
  • a further six months in either emergency medicine or another discipline;
  • completion of the primary examination; and
  • the provision of three structured references.
Advanced

The advanced training program is of four years duration with a requirement that 30 months is spent in emergency medicine over a minimum of two sites, one of which must be designated as major referral and one as urban district or rural/regional.

During advanced training, trainees acquire and demonstrate the knowledge, skills and attitudes that are outlined in the fellowship curriculum as being required for good clinical practice in emergency medicine. The balance is non-emergency department training, where trainees learn and experience more detailed aspects of related disciplines. The curriculum is described in the Training and Examination Handbook.

Trainee Selection

There is no selection process for trainees entering either basic or provisional training. The program is open to any registered medical practitioner.

Trainees undergo a selection process for advanced training although there is no quota applied. Selection to advanced training requires successful completion of 12 months provisional training, a pass in the primary examination and satisfactory structured references. Trainees satisfying all these requirements will move into advanced training.

Trainee Assessment

Provisional training

Assessment of this training component is via the completion of In-Training Assessments (ITA) that record the trainee’s performance in various domains of learning and assessment as related to aspects of the fellowship curriculum. Domains include: knowledge and basic skills; clinical judgment; practical skills; professional relationships and communication; ability to perform under stress and different workloads; sense of responsibility and work ethic; motivation and commitment to self directed learning; supervision and education of junior medical staff; and research and quality improvement.

Structured references that assess these domains are supplied by the supervisor of training and two others.

The primary examination examines the basic sciences of anatomy, pathology, physiology and pharmacology as relevant to emergency medicine.

Advanced Training

There is a requirement that competence is achieved in the management of paediatric emergencies evidenced by completion of a logbook. A research component is to be completed during either provisional or advanced training.

Assessment continues via the completion of In-Training Assessments, as described under provisional training, and the fellowship examination.

Fellowship Examination

The fellowship examination is an exit examination taken in the last year of training. The criteria are set with the issues of safe specialist practice foremost in mind. The examination consists of six sections. Candidates must pass at least four sections with specified total scores depending on the number of sections passed.

Overseas Trained Specialists

For those OTSs seeking fellowship of the ACEM (FACEM), the college conducts an assessment of the OTS’s qualification in line with that recommended by the Australian Medical Council (AMC). Key assessment tools are the applicant’s curriculum vitae, response to the questionnaire regarding consultant posts held, referee reports and response at a structured interview.

The interview addresses the applicant’s basic qualifications; advanced qualifications, experience, research and publications, education and teaching, emergency medicine administration, topical issues in emergency medicine, and knowledge of, and attitude towards, the college. A written report is sent to the council. The Board of Education also reviews the recommendation.

Outcomes can include election to fellowship without further requirements, a period of supervised practice in a multi-FACEM emergency department, completion of the research regulation, completion of the fellowship examination or a combination of these.

Assessment of OTSs for an Area of Need (AON) position also follows that laid out by the AMC. Assessment for fellowship requirements will now be conducted along with the AON assessment. The recommendation of the applicant as suitable for the AON post does not imply the applicant has demonstrated satisfactory comparability with a FACEM.

Accreditation

Hospital emergency departments meeting minimum criteria as stated in the Guidelines for Adult and Mixed Emergency Departments Seeking Training Accreditation are accredited for either six, 12 or 24 months of emergency medicine training.

Consideration will be given to staffing levels, case mix of patients, design and equipment, support services, the education and research program, accreditation of other specialties within the hospital and the impact of access block.

Inspections are carried out at the request of a hospital seeking accreditation or as part of a five-year cycle of reinspection. A team of three senior fellows visits the hospital and meets with staff of the emergency department and other senior staff. The outcome is discussed by the team and reported to the Board of Education and then to Council, where the decision is made.

Further Information

Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (ACEM)

Australasian College of Sports Physicians

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Training Program

Basic/Foundation

Applicants for selection for advanced training are required to complete the equivalent of three years general medical and surgical experience since graduation from their undergraduate medical degree, in posts recognised by the College. At least two of these three years must have been in full-time positions in hospitals approved by the College.

Advanced

The advanced training program is of four years duration with a requirement that three years FTE are spent fully supervised. The fourth year can comprise continued supervised training or be structured as an elective year.

The college’s advanced training program is conducted almost exclusively in the private practice environment.

During advanced training, trainees acquire and demonstrate the knowledge, skills and attitudes that are outlined in the curriculum as being required for specialist clinical practice in sport and exercise medicine. The full curriculum is available on the College website.

Trainee Selection

Trainees undergo a selection process for advanced training. although there is no quota applied, training placements are limited. Selection to advanced training requires successful completion of the College’s Part 1, basic medical sciences, examination, curriculum vitae demonstrating an interest in, and commitment to, sport and exercise medicine, satisfactory structured references and satisfactory attendance at interview. Applicants must also be eligible for permanent residency and unconditional registration in Australia or New Zealand. Applicants satisfying all these requirements will be considered for selection into advanced training.

The College conducts one selection process annually.

Trainee Assessment

Advanced Training

Trainees are required to attend six-monthly interviews throughout the period of training. In order to be accredited for the training period, trainees must provide a satisfactory six monthly progress review form prior to the scheduled meeting. The six monthly progress review form is essentially a summary of the learning experiences of the registrar over the preceding six month period and includes reports from all supervisors.

Trainees are also required to demonstrate progress towards completion of a number of workplace based assessments including:

  • Mini Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX);
  • Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS); and
  • Case based Discussion (CbD).

They must produce their learning portfolio with all required documentation in relation to their annual learning plan and progress as stipulated in the curriculum. Trainees are also required to complete a series of post-graduate academic modules in the following subjects:

  • Research Methods;
  • Sports Nutrition;
  • Sport Psychology;
  • Sports Pharmacology; and
  • Biomechanics.
Fellowship Examination

The fellowship examination is an exit examination taken after completion of all supervised training, usually in the final year of training. The examination is designed to verify the clinical competence and safety of the trainee prior to being designated as a specialist. The examination consists of six sections, a written examination comprising a multiple choice question paper and a short answer paper, a long case clinical examination, a short case (acute) clinical examination, a short case (overuse) clinical examination and a viva, all of which must be passed by the candidate.

Overseas Trained Specialists

For those OTSs seeking fellowship of the ACSP (FACSP), the College conducts an assessment of the OTS’s qualification in line with that recommended by the Australian Medical Council (AMC). Key assessment tools are the applicant’s curriculum vitae, followed by response to any specific questions raised by the College.

Accreditation

Training practices are accredited for a period of up to two years and are subject to regular site assessments by the College.

Assessments of all training practices are carried out on a regular cycle. A team of two senior fellows visits the practice and meets with staff, trainees, supervisors and other relevant personnel. The outcome is discussed by the team and reported to the Training Committee, where the decision is made. A written report, which includes both commendations and recommendations, is provided to the training practice on completion of the process.

Further Information

Australasian College of Sports Physicians (ACSP)

General Practice Education and Training Limited

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General Practice Education and Training Limited (GPET) manages the administration of the Australian General Practice Training Program (AGPT Program) on behalf of the Australian Government. GPET is an independent company established in 2001 by the Minister for Health and Ageing to fund and oversee vocational general practice training throughout Australia. The AGPT Program is delivered in accordance with the curricula and training standards of the RACGP and/or ACRRM.

The AGPT Program offers postgraduate doctors a range of options for urban and rural vocational training, provided through regional training providers throughout Australia.

The regional training providers deliver training that on successful completion leads towards Fellowship of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (FRACGP) and/or Fellowship of the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (FACRRM). The completion of the college assessment requirements marks the end point of training and is required for vocational registration under Medicare.

The AGPT Program consists of a General Pathway and a Rural Pathway. Registrars on the General Pathway are required to undertake a mandatory 12-month placement in a rural, outer metropolitan, Indigenous Health training post, and/or non-capital city ASGC Remoteness Area 1 location as part of their training. Registrars on the Rural Pathway undertake the majority of their training in ASGC Remoteness Area 2–5 locations.

Training Program

The AGPT Program is a three or four-year full-time equivalent program for trainees. Both colleges have vocational training programs - each with different requirements. Additional information about vocational training requirements can be found on the relevant college websites. Some comparative information can be found in the current GP Registrar’s Guide available from the GPET website.

Trainee Selection

Refer to the Applicant Guide provided on GPET’s website for further details.

Trainee (Fellowship) Assessment

Refer to the RACGP and ACRRM websites.

Accreditation

Pursuant to RACGP and ACRRM standards.

Further Information

Australian General Practice Training

Royal Australian College of General Practitioners

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The RACGP sets the standards for general practice training for general practice registrars training towards Fellowship of the RACGP. On successful completion of training and success in the RACGP assessments, candidates are usually eligible for the award of fellowship of the RACGP.

Training Program

The typical length of training is three years.

The typical training program for a registrar is at least 12-month placement at a hospital, 18 months of core training in an RACGP accredited general practice and a further 6 months in an extended skills post, which may be hospital or general practice based.

Trainee Selection

Applicants for general practice training apply through GPET for selection. The GPET website should be referred to for more information.2

Trainee Assessment

Formative assessment includes the development of the registrar’s learning plan. This must be done early enough and with sufficient frequency to provide the opportunity for registrars to regularly update their learning plans. Training includes specific, timely and regular feedback to registrars about their performance, including information concerning what needs to be improved and an agreed plan for how to go about making the desired changes.

As part of general practice specialist training towards fellowship (FRACGP), registrars undertake the college’s examination. This examination consists of three components – two written and one clinical. Further details are provided on the college’s website.

International Medical Graduates (IMG)/Overseas Trained Doctors

The RACGP conducts assessment of IMGs’ general practice qualifications and experience.

Assessment for Comparability

The majority of assessments conducted by the RACGP are for comparability of overseas general practice experience to Australian general practice experience. This assessment is designed to assist in determining eligibility:

  • to enrol in the college examination or practice based assessment;
  • for full membership of the RACGP;
  • as part of an Australian rural workforce agency application; and/or
  • for entry into a RACGP Specialist training pathway.

Further details are provided on the college’s website at:
The General Practice Experience (Practice Eligible) pathway and http://www.racgp.org.au/overseastraineddoctors

Accreditation

The RACGP accreditation criteria are documented in the RACGP Standards for General Practice Education and Training Trainers and Training Posts 2005 found at General Practice Vocational Training Standards.

Under the new delegated arrangements introduced in 2011 the regional training providers are conducting the accreditation process according to the RACGP standards. On successful completion of process the regional training providers send a recommendation to the RACGP for endorsement. The RACGP suggests that all posts consider having at least two RACGP trainers per post. The post and trainer are accredited for a maximum of three years, after which reaccreditation is required.

Further Information

www.racgp.org.au

2 http://www.racgp.org.au/Content/NavigationMenu/educationandtraining/vocationaltraining/RACGPGeneralPracticeVocationalTrainingStandards/2005_Standards_Programs_and_Providers.pdf