Medical Training Review Panel: fourteenth report

Vocational Training Data

Page last updated: 11 March 2011

In 2010, there were 14,679 vocational training positions/trainees (Table 4.3). The largest number was in adult medicine (3,310), followed by general practice (2,692) and emergency medicine (1,684).

Data covers all Australian trainees. A number of medical colleges provide training overseas and Australian trainees within these overseas programs are included in the data, whereas non-Australian trainees are excluded.

It should be noted that numbers reported for some specialties differ sometimes across tables, particularly in relation to Tables 4.3 and 4.4. This is primarily due to variation in what is included in the numbers in respect to New Zealand and other overseas trainees. Differences in inclusions are duly noted in the table footnotes where applicable.

Table 4.3: Vocational training positions/trainees by medical specialty, 2010

Medical specialtyBasic traineesAdvanced traineesTotal college trainees
Addiction medicine
..
11
11
Adult medicine(a)(b)
1,904
1,406
3,310
Anaesthesia
504
612
(c)1,116
Anaesthesia - Pain medicine
..
51
51
Dermatology
42
45
87
Emergency medicine
(d)803
881
1,684
General practice

- GPET
- ACCRM(e)


..
50


2,572
70


2,572
120
Intensive care
167
332
499
Medical administration(f)
..
105
105
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
295
123
418
Occupational and Environmental medicine(b)
..
87
87
Ophthalmology(g)
55
49
104
Paediatrics(a)(b)
560
583
1,143
Palliative medicine(h)
..
58
58
Pathology
..
301
301
Pathology and RACP (jointly)
..
131
131
Psychiatry
677
(i)350
1,027
Public health medicine(b)
..
60
60
Radiation oncology
..
110
110
Radiodiagnosis
..
333
333
Rehabilitiation medicine(b)
..
143
143
Sexual health medicine
..
19
19
Surgery(j)
..
1,000
(k)1,190
Total
5,057
9,432
14,679

(a) Includes trainees based outside Australia.
(b) All figures refl ect only those trainees registered as of the end of July 2010.
(c) A further 275 are undertaking pre-training.
(d) Includes Basic and Provisional trainees.
(e) These registrars are in the ACRRM Independent Pathway. ACRRM classifies the first 3 years of training as basic training and the fourth year of training as the advanced year.
(f) Includes 15 New Zealand and overseas trainees.
(g) In addition there are 29 trainees in national or international training posts in their final (5th year) of training and 5 trainees across the training program in their 6th year of training and yet to complete training requirements.
(h) Only includes Palliative Medicine Chapter trainees, not college trainees.
(i) Includes 161 Australian fellows undertaking subspecialty training.
(j) RACS does not differentiate between basic and advanced surgical trainees, as the surgical program is an integrated program (SET).
(k) Includes 1000 Australian, 177 New Zealand and 13 overseas trainees.

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

Advanced Training

In 2010, there were 9,432 advanced vocational training positions/trainees in programs in Australia (Table 4.3). This constitutes almost two thirds (64.3%) of the total number of all vocational training positions/trainees. The specialty with the largest number was general practice (2,642), followed by adult medicine (1,406) and surgery (1,000).

Table 4.4 shows the distribution of advanced training positions/trainees across states and territories. The numbers differ from those in Table 4.3, in particular due to registrars who transfer between providers part-way through the year being counted against each state/territory tally, but only once in the Australian total.

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Table 4.4: Advanced vocational training positions/trainees by medical specialty and state/territory, 2010

Medical specialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
Addiction medicine
6
2
1
2
0
0
0
0
11
Adult medicine(a)
427
407
211
120
101
19
19
27
1,328
Anaesthesia
200
152
132
44
57
11
2
14
612
Anaesthesia - Pain medicine
20
14
6
4
4
2
0
1
51
Dermatology
13
12
10
5
4
1
0
0
45
Emergency medicine
241
217
182
71
117
15
21
17
881
General practice

- GPET
- ACRRM(d)


(b)851
9


616
5


540
37


204
4


216
10


84
2


80
2


(b)na
0


(c)2,572
69
Intensive care
99
87
68
31
30
6
4
7
332
Medical administration
21
24
27
3
6
1
2
6
90
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
46
37
24
3
6
3
0
4
123
Occupational and Environmental medicine(a)
26
11
11
8
10
0
0
3
69
Ophthalmolog(e)
19
14
8
4
3
1
0
0
49
Paediatrics(a)
202
156
84
41
53
4
5
9
554
Palliative medicine
12
16
13
8
1
0
0
0
50
Pathology
102
73
60
22
5
3
9
27
301
Pathology and RACP (jointly)(a)
52
41
18
5
11
0
0
1
128
Psychiatry(f)
116
117
57
25
1
2
8
24
350
Public health medicine(a)
17
10
8
1
7
1
10
6
60
Radiation oncology
42
23
23
8
6
1
0
7
110
Radiodiagnosis
93
96
61
36
30
7
0
10
333
Rehabilitiation medicine(a)
60
34
27
10
7
1
1
3
143
Sexual health medicine
5
3
2
2
2
0
2
0
16
Surgery(g)
354
281
170
79
13
6
11
86
1,000
Total
3,033
2,448
1,780
740
700
170
176
252
9,277

(a) Does not include trainees based overseas.
(b) ACT trainees are included in NSW total.
(c) Registrars who transfer between providers part-way through the year are counted against each state tally, but only once in the total.
(d) These registrars are in the ACRRM Independent Pathway, Advanced Specialised Training.
(e) In addition there are 29 trainees in national or international training posts in their final (5th year) of training and 5 trainees in their 6th year of training and yet to complete training requirements.
(f) Includes 161 Australian fellows undertaking subspecialty training.
(g) Includes only Australian trainees. RACS does not differentiate between basic and advanced surgical trainees, as the surgical program is an integrated program (SET).

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

The majority of advanced training positions/trainees were located in New South Wales (32.7%), Victoria (26.4%) and Queensland (19.2%) (Table 4.5). Overall, advanced trainees were reasonably well distributed across states and territories when compared with their relative proportions of the Australian population.

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Table 4.5: Proportion of advanced vocational training positions/trainees by medical specialty and state/territory, 2010

Medical specialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
Addiction medicine
54.5
18.2
9.1
18.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
100.0
Adult medicine
32.2
30.6
15.9
9.0
7.6
1.4
1.4
2.0
100.0
Anaesthesia
32.7
24.8
21.6
7.2
9.3
1.8
0.3
2.3
100.0
Anaesthesia - Pain medicine
39.2
27.5
11.8
7.8
7.8
3.9
0.0
2.0
100.0
Dermatology
28.9
26.7
22.2
11.1
8.9
2.2
0.0
0.0
100.0
Emergency medicine
27.4
24.6
20.7
8.1
13.3
1.7
2.4
1.9
100.0
General practice

- GPET
- ACRRM


33.1
13.0


24.0
7.2


21.0
53.6


7.9
5.8


8.4
14.5


3.3
2.9


3.1
2.9


na
0.0


100.0
100.0
Intensive care
29.8
26.2
20.5
9.3
9.0
1.8
1.2
2.1
100.0
Medical administration
23.3
26.7
30.0
3.3
6.7
1.1
2.2
6.7
100.0
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
37.4
30.1
19.5
2.4
4.9
2.4
0.0
3.3
100.0
Occupational and Environmental medicine
37.7
15.9
15.9
11.6
14.5
0.0
0.0
4.3
100.0
Ophthalmology
38.8
28.6
16.3
8.2
6.1
2.0
0.0
0.0
100.0
Paediatrics
36.5
28.2
15.2
7.4
9.6
0.7
0.9
1.6
100.0
Palliative medicine
24.0
32.0
26.0
16.0
2.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
100.0
Pathology
33.9
24.3
19.9
7.3
1.7
1.0
3.0
9.0
100.0
Pathology and RACP (jointly)
40.6
32.0
14.1
3.9
8.6
0.0
0.0
0.8
100.0
Psychiatry
33.1
33.4
16.3
7.1
0.3
0.6
2.3
6.9
100.0
Public health medicine
28.3
16.7
13.3
1.7
11.7
1.7
16.7
10.0
100.0
Radiation oncology
38.2
20.9
20.9
7.3
5.5
0.9
0.0
6.4
100.0
Radiodiagnosis
27.9
28.8
18.3
10.8
9.0
2.1
0.0
3.0
100.0
Rehabilitation medicine
42.0
23.8
18.9
7.0
4.9
0.7
0.7
2.1
100.0
Sexual health medicine
31.3
18.8
12.5
12.5
12.5
0.0
12.5
0.0
100.0
Surgery
35.4
28.1
17.0
7.9
1.3
0.6
1.1
8.6
100.0
Total (state/territory)
32.7
26.4
19.2
8.0
7.5
1.8
1.9
2.7
100.0
Population proportion (%)(a)
32.5
24.8
20.2
7.4
10.2
2.3
1.0
1.6
100.0

(a) Population data from ABS, Australian Demographic Statistics, 2009 (Cat.no. 3101.0), Canberra.

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

First-year Advanced Trainees

In 2010, there were 2,730 first-year advanced vocational training positions/trainees (Table 4.6). The specialty with the most first-year advanced vocational training places was general practice (814), followed by adult medicine and emergency medicine with 432 and 282 training positions/trainees respectively.

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Table 4.6: First-year advanced vocational training positions/trainees by medical specialty and state/territory, 2010

Medical specialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
Addiction medicine001100002
Adult medicine(a)(b)
136
131
77
46
28
4
4
6
432
Anaesthesia
64
49
58
14
16
6
2
5
214
Anaesthesia - Pain medicine
10
4
2
3
2
1
0
0
22
Dermatology
2
4
6
3
2
1
0
0
18
Emergency medicine
78
59
65
19
48
4
5
4
282
General practice

- GPET
- ACRRM(e)


(c)252
9


173
5


163
37


54
4


68
10


20
2


1812
1


(c)na
0


(d)745
69
Intensive care
16
19
13
5
3
1
0
2
60
Medical administration
0
2
5
0
0
0
0
1
8
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
20
17
15
1
2
1
0
3
59
Occupational and Environmental medicine
11
4
3
3
5
0
1
1
27
Ophthalmology
10
7
6
1
1
1
0
27
Paediatrics(a)(b)
50
35
16
17
8
1
0
4
131
Palliative medicine
10
15
9
6
1
0
1
0
41
Pathology
17
16
9
1
3
1
0
2
50
Pathology and RACP (jointly)
16
10
6
1
1
0
2
0
34
Psychiatry(f)
37
39
24
12
11
0
8
4
129
Public health medicine(a)
6
4
4
1
2
1
0
2
28
Radiation oncology(g)
7
2
4
1
1
0
0
0
15
Radiodiagnosis(h)
10
18
5
7
11
4
0
1
56
Rehabilitation medicine
9
7
8
3
1
1
0
1
30
Sexual health medicine
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
Surgery(i)
86
67
45
23
19
4
2
4
250
Total
856
687
581
227
243
53
46
40
2,730

(a) Numbers do not necessarily equate to the calendar year as these take into account other factors, including part-time training.
(b) Adult Medicine and Paediatrics numbers include trainees within joint programs and excludes those based overseas.
(c) ACT trainees are included in NSW total.
(d) 3 registrars who changed states in their first year are counted against each state and once in the total.
(e) Include ACRRM Independent Pathway registrars and 1 registrar training in New Zealand.
(f) Includes Australian fellows undertaking subspecialty training.
(g) New Radiation Oncology trainees entering into the training program commencing from 1/1/2010.
(h) New Radiodiagnosis trainees entering into the training program commencing from 1/1/2010.
(i) Includes only Australian trainees. RACS does not differentiate between basic and advanced surgical trainees, as the surgical program is an integrated program (SET).

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

Female Trainees

In 2010, almost half (4,494 or 47.6%) of all advanced vocational trainees were female (Table 4.7). The number of female advanced vocational trainees within each specialty ranged from four in addiction medicine to 1,684 in general practice. Specialties with the highest proportion of females included pathology (80.1%), obstetrics and gynaecology (65.0%) and general practice (63.8%).

Training programs with a comparatively low proportion of females included occupational and environmental medicine (18.8%), surgery (22.8%) and intensive care (27.1%).

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Table 4.7: Female advanced vocational trainees by medical specialty and state/territory, 2010

Medical specialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
Addiction medicine
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
4
Adult medicine
211
185
80
56
36
8
8
11
595
Anaesthesia
80
69
44
19
19
7
1
5
244
Anaesthesia - Pain medicine
9
4
0
0
1
1
0
0
15
Dermatology
4
8
7
3
2
1
0
0
25
Emergency medicine
101
77
10
25
44
8
12
3
340
General practice

- GPET
- ACRRM(c)


(a)536
2


402
0


339
9


140
2


160
2


60
0


45
0


(a)na
0


(b)1,669
15
Intensive care
32
24
16
6
10
0
0
2
90
Medical administration
8
5
10
1
2
0
0
3
29
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
32
24
14
1
5
2
0
2
80
Occupational and Environmental medicine
7
2
1
2
1
0
0
0
13
Ophthalmology
7
7
1
2
2
0
0
0
19
Paediatrics
125
108
58
26
30
3
1
7
358
Palliative medicine
7
9
9
5
1
0
0
0
31
Pathology
96
57
42
11
4
2
9
20
241
Psychiatry
56
70
32
14
0
2
6
13
193
Public helath medicine
11
7
4
0
5
0
6
4
37
Radiation oncology
29
10
14
3
3
0
0
5
64
Radiodiagnosis
43
36
158
2
6
0
0
4
106
Rehabilitation medicine
39
21
15
6
5
0
1
1
88
Sexual health medicine
2
2
1
2
2
0
1
0
10
Surgery(d)
77
66
39
17
2
4
2
21
228
Total
1,516
1,194
821
343
342
98
92
101
4,494

(a) ACT trainees are included in NSW total.
(b) Registrars who transfer between providers part-way through the year are counted against each state tally but only once in the total.
(c) ACRRM Independent Pathway registrars.
(d) RACS does not differentiate between basic and advanced surgical trainees as the surgical program is an integrated program (SET).

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

Part-time Training

Some colleges provide the opportunity for trainees to train part-time subject to approval by the employing authority, such as the hospital or laboratory. In 2010, there were 971 part-time advanced trainees across specialties. This represents 10.3% of all advanced trainees (Table 4.8).

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Table 4.8: Advances vocational trainees undertaking part-time training by medical specialty and state/territory, 2010

Medical specialtyNSWVicQldSaWATasNTACTAust
Addiction medicine
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
Adult medicine
26
12
6
6
5
1
1
2
59
Anaesthesia
1
10
4
6
2
0
0
1
24
Anasthesia - Pain medicine
3
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
6
Dermatology
2
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
5
Emergency medicine(a)
10
2
5
0
3
1
2
0
23
General practice
(b)233
144
94
65
37
31
27
(b)na
631
Intensive care
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
Medical administration
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
(c)3
Occupational and Environmental medicine
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Ophthalmology
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
Paediatrics
26
25
15
4
6
0
0
0
76
Palliative medicine
0
1
1
3
0
0
0
0
5
Pathology
5
4
1
0
0
0
0
1
11
Psychiatry
21
21
12
1
0
0
2
7
64
Public health medicine
2
1
5
0
2
0
0
1
11
Radiation oncolocy
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
4
Radiodiagnosis
4
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
7
Rehabilitation medicine
6
9
6
3
1
0
0
1
26
Sexual health medicine
3
2
1
2
2
0
1
0
11
Surgery(d)
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
Total
345
237
155
95
58
33
33
15
971

(a) Shows part-time training during year to date, but does not imply entire year has been part-time.
(b) ACT trainees are included in NSW total.
(c) Total does not include trainees who took leave in 2010.
(d) RACS does not differentiate between basic and advanced surgical trainees as the surgical program is an integrated program (SET).

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

Further information on the availability of part-time training and interrupted training for each specialty can be found in Appendix B.

Discontinuation of Training

Trainees may discontinue training for a variety of reasons, with either the trainee officially withdrawing from the training program, or the college or training provider terminating or dismissing a trainee in accordance with college regulations or employment conditions.

In 2010, 213 advanced trainees discontinued training (Table 4.9).

Data on discontinuations for individual specialties has not been shown due to the small numbers for most. However, a few specialities had larger numbers of discontinuations. Emergency medicine and surgery had the highest numbers with 64 and 56 discontinuations (equivalent to 3.8% and 4.7% of all trainees in these specialties) respectively. Although the number of discontinuations in general practice appears quite large (37 discontinuations), the proportion is relatively small (1.4%), given that there were over two thousand trainees undertaking general practice training in 2010.

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Table 4.9: Advanced vocational trainee discontinuations by state/territory, 2007-2010

(a)NSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
2007(b)
15
13
5
6
6
1
1
1
79
2008
37
29
29
6
7
2
1
1
112
2009(c)
40
36
28
7
15
2
0
1
130
2010
72
58
45
10
11
3
3
11
213

(a) GPET reports joint figures for NSW and ACT under NSW.
(b) Australian total exceeds state/territory total as data for all training programs was not available disaggregated by state/territory.
(c) Includes 1 overseas trainee.

Source: Medical colleges and GPET

Basic Training

Several colleges require periods of defined basic training prior to an individual commencing the advanced training program. Tables 4.10 and 4.11 provide data for those specialties that require a period of recognised basic training.

In total there were an estimated 5,057 basic trainees, representing 34.5% of all trainees in 2010 (Table 4.3). This is a significant increase from the 757 trainees undertaking basic vocational training in 1997, when the data was first reported. The main reason for this increase is that many colleges have since introduced additional basic training as a pre-requisite to advanced training.

The specialties with the largest number of basic trainees were adult medicine (1,893), emergency medicine (803) and psychiatry (677) (Table 4.10).

Of the total number of basic trainees, 1,244 were in their first year. The specialty with the largest number of first-year basic trainees was adult medicine (522), followed by anaesthesia (240) and psychiatry (223). As emergency medicine allows new trainees to enter the program at any time during basic or provisional training, the number of first-year emergency medicine trainees is not included.

Further information on the training requirements for each specialty is provided in Appendix B.

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Table 4.10: Basic trainees and first-year basic trainees by medical specialty and state/territory, 2010

Medical specialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
All basic trainees
Adult medicine(a)
479
556
427
159
176
41
18
37
1,893
Anaesthesia
151
121
115
42
46
15
1
13
504
Dermatology
14
11
9
5
3
0
0
0
42
Emergency medicine
243
171
201
67
66
19
16
20
803
General practice - ACRRM(b)
9
2
28
1
4
2
4
0
50
Intensive Care
64
14
48
23
8
1
4
5
167
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
86
83
73
20
19
6
1
7
295
Ophthalmology
25
13
7
3
5
1
1
0
55
Paediatrics(a)
165
134
114
59
60
8
4
10
554
Psychiatry
256
170
126
45
50
13
4
13
677
Total
1,492
1,275
1,148
424
437
106
53
105
5,040
First-year basic trainees
Adult medicine
110
164
122
57
38
11
12
8
522
Anaesthesia
86
57
45
19
22
6
1
4
240
Dermatology
10
7
5
1
0
0
0
0
23
Emergency medicine
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
Intensive care
1
1
7
2
0
0
0
8
11
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
23
25
17
5
5
0
0
2
77
Ophthalmology
10
7
3
2
3
0
0
0
25
Paediatrics
21
33
27
21
13
2
1
5
123
Psychiatry
89
47
41
17
19
3
2
5
223
Total
350
341
267
124
100
22
16
24
1,244

(a) Does not include trainees based overseas.
(b) ACRRM Independent Pathway registrars.

Source: Medical colleges

In 2010, half (2,498 or 49.6%) of all basic trainees were female (Table 4.11). The specialty with the largest number of females was adult medicine, with 898 female basic trainees. However, the specialties with the largest proportion of females are obstetrics and gynaecology, paediatrics and dermatology in which 69.8%, 67.9% and 64.3% of all trainees are female respectively.

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Table 4.11: Female basic trainees by medical specialty and state/territory, 2010

Medical specialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
Female basic trainees
Adult medicine
235
306
171
75
72
10
8
21
898
Anaesthesia
74
56
42
21
25
4
1
4
227
Dermatology
11
8
5
2
1
0
0
0
27
Emergency medicine
101
67
77
18
28
3
7
6
307
General Practice - ACRRM(a)
2
1
6
0
2
1
1
0
13
Intensive care
29
3
13
8
1
0
0
2
56
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
61
64
42
18
12
3
1
5
206
Ophthalmology
11
7
2
2
0
0
0
0
22
Paediatrics
109
97
70
42
42
7
2
7
376
Psychiatry
133
105
54
26
34
3
2
9
366
Total
766
714
482
212
217
31
22
54
2,498
Proportion of all basic trainees (%)
Adult medicine
49.1
55.0
40.0
47.2
40.9
24.4
44.4
56.8
47.4
Anaesthesia
49.0
46.3
36.5
50.0
54.3
26.7
100.0
30.8
45.0
Dermatology
78.6
72.7
55.6
40.0
33.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
64.3
Emergency medicine
41.6
39.2
38.3
26.9
42.4
15.8
43.8
30.0
38.2
Intensive care
45.3
21.4
27.1
34.8
12.5
0.0
0.0
40.0
33.5
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
70.9
77.1
57.5
90.0
63.2
50.0
100.0
71.4
69.8
Ophthalmology
44.0
53.8
28.6
66.7
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
40.0
Paediatrics
66.1
72.4
61.4
71.2
70.0
87.5
50.0
70.0
67.9
Psychiatry
52.0
61.8
42.9
57.8
68.0
23.1
50.0
69.2
54.1
Total
51.3
56.0
42.0
50.0
49.7
29.2
41.5
51.4
49.6

(a) ACRRM Independent Pathway registrars.

Source: Medical colleges

General Practice

General practitioners’ training under the AGPTP is provided through 20 regional training providers. Data from these are presented in Table 4.12.

In 2010, there were 2,572 general practice trainees. The largest number of these were in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory (851), followed by Victoria (616) and Queensland (540).

Almost two thirds (64.9%) of all general practice trainees were female.

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Table 4.12: General practice trainees: Registrars, first-year registrars and female registrars by state/territory and training consortium, 2010

Regional training providerRegistrarsProportion registrars (%)First year registrarsFemale registrarsProportion female (%)
New South Wales and Australian Capital Territory
CoastCityCountry Training Inc
174
20.4
49
103
59.2
Beyond Medical Education (NSW)(a)
75
8.8
26
42
56.0
General Practice Training - Valley to Coast
135
15.9
36
88
65.2
North Coast NSW General Practice Training Ltd
83
9.8
25
54
65.1
GP Synergy(b)
282
33.1
85
181
64.2
WentWest Ltd
109
12.8
33
73
67.0
Total NSW and ACT
851
252
536
63.0
Victoria
Bogong Regional Training Network
75
12.2
20
36
48.0
Greater Green Triangle GP Education and Training Inc
59
9.6
19
38
64.4
Beyond Medical Education (VIC)(a)
101
16.4
30
53
61.4
Victorian Metropolitan Alliance
307
49.8
83
227
73.9
getGP Ltd
77
12.5
21
42
54.5
Total Victoria
616
173
402
65.3
Queensland
Central and Southern Old Traing
288
53.3
92
189
65.6
Queensland Rural Medical Education(c)
109
20.2
33
58
53.2
Tropical Medical Training
144
26.7
38
93
64.6
Total Queensland
540
163
339
62.8
South Australia
Adelaide to Outback Training Program
116
56.9
30
80
69.0
Sturt-Fleurieu General Practice Education and Training
88
43.1
24
60
68.2
Total South Australia
204
54
140
68.6
Western Australia
WAGPET Ltd
216
100.0
68
160
74.1
Total Western Australia
216
68
160
74.1
Tasmania
General Practice Training Tasmania
84
100.0
20
60
71.4
Total Tasmania
84
20
60
71.4
Northern Territory
Northern Territory General Practice Education Ltd
80
100.0
18
45
56.3
Total Nothern Territory
80
18
45
56.3
Australia(d)
2,572
745
1,669
64.9

(a) GPLogic merged with Victoria Felix Medical Education to become Beyond Medical Education on 1/1/10.
(b) GP Synergy includes Institute of General Practice Education from 1/1/10.
(c) Formerly Rural and Regional QLD Consortium.
(d) Registrars who transfer between providers part-way through the year are counted against each state tally but only once in the total.

Source: GPET

Rural Pathway

In 2010, there were 1,129 trainees completing general practice training through the rural pathway. New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory had the largest number (308), followed by Victoria with 306 trainees (Table 4.13).

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Table 4.13: General practice rural pathway trainees by state/territory, 2010

NSW/ACTVicQldSAWATasNT(a)Aust
Number
308
306
249
93
90
38
51
1,129
Proportion(%)
27.3
27.1
22.1
8.2
8.0
3.4
4.5
100.0

(a) Trainees who transfer between providers part-way through the year are counted against each state tally, but only once in the total.

Source: GPET

Subspecialty Training

Pathology Subspecialties

In 2010, there were 451 advanced trainees undertaking training with the Royal College of Pathologists Australasia (RCPA) (Table 4.14). Almost half of these (49.0% or 221) were within the subspecialty of anatomical pathology.

Table 4.14: Advanced pathology training positions: Total, proportion of total and females by subspecialty, 2010

SubspecialtyPositionsProportion(%)Females
Anatomical pathology
221
49.0
123
Chemical pathology
20
4.4
9
Forensic pathology
10
2.2
5
General pathology
6
1.3
5
Genetics
6
1.3
1
Haematology
118
26.2
59
Immunology
23
5.1
13
Microbiology
45
10.0
25
Oral pathology
2
0.4
1
Total
451
100.0
241

Source: RCPA

Physician Subspecialties

In 2010, there were 1,989 advanced physician trainees undertaking training with the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP) (Table 4.15). Of all the subspecialties, paediatrics had the largest number of advanced trainees (450), followed by cardiology (189).

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Table 4.15: Advanced physician trainees: Total, proportion of total and females by subspecialty(a), 2010

SubspecialtyTraineesProportion(%)Females
Cardiology
189
9.5
48
Clinical genetics
19
1.0
15
Clinical pharmacology
14
0.7
5
Endocrinology
116
5.8
73
Gastroenterology
118
5.9
32
General medicine
155
7.8
54
Geriatric medicine
129
6.5
77
Haematology
116
5.8
54
Immunology and allergy
36
1.8
20
Infectious diseases
117
5.9
62
Intensive care medicine
6
0.3
1
Medical oncology
133
6.7
70
Nephrology
85
4.3
35
Neurology
82
4.1
33
Nuclear medicine
20
1.0
5
Paediatrics(b)
450
22.6
293
Palliative medicine
50
2.5
36
Respiratory and sleep medicine
111
5.6
37
Rheumatology
43
2.2
22
Total
1,989
100.0
972

(a) Includes trainees within the joint RACP and RCPA program and trainees undertaking advanced training in more than one subspecialty. Therefore the total is greater than figure reported in previous table.
(b) Paediatric medicine includes general paediatrics, community child health, neonatal/perinatal medicine and paediatric emergency medicine.

Source: RACP

Paediatric Subspecialties

In 2010, there were 618 advanced paediatric and child health trainees with the RACP's Paediatric and Child Health Division (Table 4.16). Of these, 393 or 63.6% were female. Half (310 or 50.2%) of all trainees were training in general paediatrics.

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Table 4.16: Advanced paediatric and child health trainees: Total, proportion of total and females by subspecialty(a), 2010

SubspecialtyTraineesProportion(%)Females
Cardiology
13
2.1
5
Clinical genetics
15
2.4
12
Clinical pharmacology
2
0.3
1
Community child health
39
6.3
35
Emergency medicine
26
4.2
16
Endocrinology
17
2.8
14
Gastroenterology
13
2.1
2
General paediatrics
310
50.2
202
Haematology
9
1.5
5
Immunology and allergy
8
1.3
4
Infectious diseases
11
1.8
10
Intensive Care Medicine
2
0.3
0
Medical oncology
12
1.9
7
Neonatal/perinatal medicine
71
11.5
36
Nephrology
2
0.3
2
Neurology
15
2.4
8
Nuclear medicine
1
0.2
0
Paediatric Emergency Medicine
30
4.9
20
Palliative medicine
3
0.5
3
Respiratory and sleep medicine
12
1.9
8
Rheumatology
7
1.1
3
Total
618
100.0
393

(a) Includes trainees within the joint RACP and RCPA program and trainees undertaking advanced training in more than one subspecialty, therefore the total number is greater than the figure previously provided.

Source: RACP

Surgical Subspecialties

In 2010, there were 1,000 advanced surgical trainees undertaking training with the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) (Table 4.17). Of these, 228 or 22.8% were female. Of the nine subspecialties, general surgery trainees had the largest number of advanced trainees (380), followed by orthopaedic surgery (215) and urology (101).

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Table 4.17: Advanced surgical subspecialties: Total, proportion of total and females by subspecialty(a), 2010

SubspecialtyTraineesProportion(%)Females
Cardiothoracic surgery
37
3.7
5
General surgery
380
38
113
Neurosurgery
47
4.7
8
Orthapaedic surgery
215
21.5
12
Otolaryngology, head and neck surgery
82
8.2
32
Paediatric surgery
23
2.3
11
Plastic and reconstructive surgery
69
6.9
17
Urology
101
10.1
19
Vascular surgery
46
4.6
11
Total
1,000
100.0
228

(a) RACS does not differentiate between basic and advanced surgical trainees as the surgical program is an integrated program (SET).

Source: RACS