Medical Training Review Panel: fourteenth report

New College Fellows

Page last updated: 11 March 2011

Current Data

In 2009, there were 2,395 new fellows in medical colleges. Of these, 935 or 39.0% were female (Table 4.28).

Table 4.28: New fellows: Total and females by medical specialty, 2009

Medical specialtyTotalProportion all new fellows (%)FemalesProportion female (%)
Addiction medicine
6
0.3
3
50.0
Adult medicine(a)
397
16.6
142
35.8
Anaesthesia
197
8.2
58
29.4
Anaesthesia – Pain medicine
9
0.4
3
33.3
Dermatology
11
0.5
10
90.9
Emergency medicine
82
3.4
30
36.6
General practice

– RACGP
– ACRRM


928
40



402
11


43.3
27.5
Intensive care
63
2.6
15
23.8
Medical administration
9
0.4
1
11.1
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
56
2.3
35
62.5
Occupational and Environmental medicine
11
0.5
1
9.1
Ophthalmology
11
0.5
4
36.4
Paediatrics
116
4.8
55
47.4
Palliative medicine
8
0.3
5
62.5
Pathology
64
2.7
30
46.9
Psychiatry
125
5.2
53
42.4
Public health medicine
12
0.5
7
58.3
Radiation oncology
18
0.8
8
44.4
Radiodiagnosis
44
1.8
18
40.9
Rehabilitation medicine
13
0.5
9
69.2
Sexual health medicine
1
0.0
1
100.0
Surgery(a)
174
7.3
34
19.5
Total
2,395
100.0
935
39.0

(a) Includes all new fellows admitted by both the Australian and New Zealand branches and overseas trained specialists.

Source: Medical colleges

Data on the state or territory in which new fellows resided is shown in Table 4.29. The total number of new fellows is lower than shown in Table 4.28 as it does not include those residing overseas.

Table 4.29: New fellows by medical specialty and state/territory, 2009

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Medical specialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
Addiction medicine
5
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
6
Adult medicine(a)
88
95
63
30
37
6
5
4
328
Anaesthesia
44
60
47
16
20
4
2
4
197
Anaesthesia – Pain medicine
3
1
2
1
2
0
0
0
9
Dermatology
4
4
0
2
1
0
0
0
11
Emergency medicine
29
18
15
0
14
3
1
2
82
General practice

– RACGP
– ACRRM


225
9


181
5


195
15


81
4


89
4


23
1


6
1


16
0


(a)928
39
Intensive care
15
11
10
5
5
0
2
1
49
Medical administration
2
3
3
0
0
0
0
1
9
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
15
19
12
3
5
1
0
1
56
Occupational and Environmental medicine
3
1
2
4
0
0
0
1
11
Ophthalmology
6
2
2
0
1
0
0
0
11
Paediatrics(a)
30
25
14
7
10
0
4
2
92
Palliative medicine(b)
2
3
1
0
1
1
0
0
8
Pathology
16
13
17
5
8
3
0
2
64
Psychiatry
31
44
26
12
8
3
1
0
125
Public health medicine
3
2
0
0
1
0
1
3
10
Radiation oncology
10
1
3
3
0
0
0
1
18
Radiodiagnosis
12
12
6
5
5
2
0
2
44
Rehabilitation medicine
7
3
2
1
0
0
0
0
13
Sexual health medicine
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
Surgery
61
45
34
17
14
0
2
1
174
Total
620
548
471
196
225
47
25
41
2,285

(a) Includes overseas trained specialists now based in Australia
(b) Only covers new Chapter Fellows with post-nominals FAChPM.

Source: Medical colleges The distribution across states and territories of female new fellows follows a similar pattern to the distribution of all new fellows (Table 4.30).

Table 4.30: Female new fellows by medical specialty and state/territory, 2009

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Medical specialtyNSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
Addiction medicine
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
Adult medicine(a)
36
35
18
13
11
2
0
0
115
Anaesthesia
16
20
11
1
7
2
1
0
58
Anaesthesia – Pain medicine
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
3
Dermatology
4
4
0
1
1
0
0
0
10
Emergency medicine
12
4
5
0
7
1
1
0
30
General practice

– RACGP
– ACRRM


110
2


97
1


90
3


41
0


39
4


15
0


2
1


8
0


402
11
Intensive care
4
2
5
1
1
0
1
0
14
Medical administration
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
10
15
5
2
2
1
0
0
35
Occupational and Environmental medicine
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
Ophthalmology
2
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
4
Paediatrics(a)
15
11
6
3
4
0
3
1
43
Palliative medicine(b)
2
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
5
Pathology
5
7
7
2
4
3
0
2
30
Psychiatry
7
20
10
9
3
3
1
0
53
Public health medicine
2
1
0
0
1
0
1
2
7
Radiation oncology
6
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
8
Radiodiagnosis
3
7
2
3
2
1
0
0
18
Rehabilitation medicine
4
2
2
1
0
0
0
0
9
Sexual health medicine
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
Surgery
12
7
8
5
2
0
0
0
34
Total
256
234
178
83
90
29
11
14
895

(a) Includes overseas trained specialists now based in Australia.
(b) Only covers new Chapter Fellows with post-nominals FAChPM.

Source: Medical colleges

Trends

Between 2005 and 2009, the number of new fellows increased overall by 733 or almost half (44.3%) (Table 4.31). General practice had the largest increase in terms of sheer numbers, with 297 more new fellows in 2009 than in 2005. It was followed by adult medicine, which increased by 216 from 2005 to 2009. The number of new fellows in adult medicine was also greatest in terms of proportional increases, more than doubling, as did the number in intensive care. Obstetrics and gynaecology number also doubled. A number of other specialties showed significant increases across the five years, however, the numbers were small and fluctuated considerably.

Ophthalmology was the only speciality with significantly fewer new fellows in 2009 than in 2005. The number of new fellows was also less in 2009 than in 2005 for a few other specialties, namely anaesthesia, dermatology and radiation oncology. However, the numbers in each were relatively small and varied considerably across the years.

Table 4.31: New fellows by medical specialty, 2005–2009

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Medical specialty20052006200720082009Increase 2005–2009 (%)
Addiction medicine
..
..
..
..
6
..
Adult medicine (a)
181
247
209
303
397
119.3
Anaesthesia
198
135
150
234
197
-0.5
Anaesthesia – Pain medicine
5
5
7
11
9
80.0
Dermatology
13
14
23
11
11
-15.4
Emergency medicine
58
78
69
95
82
41.4
General practice

– RACGP
– ACRRM


671
..


628
..


592
21


819
22


928
40


38.3
..
Intensive care
29
23
36
62
63
117.2
Medical administration
4
13
11
10
9
125.0
Obstetrics and Gynaecology(a)
28
49
46
66
56
100.0
Occupational and Environmental medicine
6
6
6
11
11
83.3
Ophthalmology
26
16
30
14
11
-57.7
Paediatrics (a)
74
73
47
114
116
56.8
Palliative medicine
..
..
..
..
8
..
Pathology
48
46
77
68
64
33.3
Public health medicine
4
13
15
13
12
200.0
Psychiatry
85
90
72
147
125
47.1
Radiation oncology
19
9
12
11
18
-5.3
Radiodiagnosis
39
74
54
54
44
12.8
Rehabilitation medicine
13
19
24
21
13
0.0
Sexual health medicine
..
..
..
..
1
..
Surgery
155
155
176
171
(b)174
12.3
Total
1,656
1,693
1,677
2,257
2,389
44.3

(a) Includes overseas trained specialists.
(b) Includes new Australian fellows only. Total new fellows for the college was 212.

Source: Medical colleges

Table 4.32 shows the states and territories in which new fellows resided.

The number of new fellows increased by around one quarter in all states over the last five years to 2009, with the exception of Queensland where the number increased by half (51%). There have also been significant increases in the number of new fellows in the territories over the same period, however, these numbers are relatively small and vary considerably.

Table 4.32: New fellows by state/territory, 2005–2009

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NSWVicQldSAWATasNTACT(a)Aust
2005
501
434
310
157
179
35
10
14
1,640
2006
530
468
308
165
163
30
11
18
1,693
2007
538
470
327
151
135
30
11
15
1,677
2008
635
543
441
213
246
49
15
23
2,165
2009
620
548
471
196
225
47
25
41
2,285
Increase 2005–2009 (%)
23.8
26.3
51.9
24.8
25.7
34.3
150.0
192.9
39.3

(a) 2005, 2008 and 2009 Australian totals differ from the sum of state/territory numbers due to the inclusion of new fellows who completed their training overseas.

Source: Medical colleges

Overall the proportion of female new fellows has remained relatively constant over recent years, with just over two-fifths of new fellows each year being female (Table 4.33). However, considerable variation is seen from year to year within many other specialities, with no sustained trends apparent for any.

Table 4.33: Proportion of female new fellows by medical specialty, 2005–2009

Medical specialty20052006200720082009
Addiction medicine
..
..
..
..
50.0
Adult medicine
36.8
36.8
38.3
41.6
35.8
Anaesthesia
43.0
43.0
31.3
35.0
29.4
Anaesthesia – Pain medicine
40.0
40.0
0.0
9.1
33.3
Dermatology
42.9
42.9
34.8
90.9
90.9
Emergency medicine
31.3
30.8
33.3
36.8
36.6
General practice

– RACGP
– ACRRM


46.8
..


46.8
..


50.0
14.3


44.8
31.8


43.3
27.5
Intensive care
8.7
8.7
13.9
25.8
23.8
Medical administration
30.8
30.8
27.3
50.0
11.1
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
46.9
46.9
58.7
62.1
62.5
Occupational and Environmental medicine
33.3
33.3
16.7
45.5
9.1
Ophthalmology
31.3
31.3
50.0
35.7
36.4
Paediatrics
45.2
45.2
57.4
56.1
47.4
Palliative medicine
..
..
..
..
62.5
Pathology
65.2
65.2
53.2
51.5
46.9
Psychiatry
48.1
54.4
43.1
42.2
42.4
Public health medicine
85.7
84.6
80.0
69.2
58.3
Radiation oncology
55.6
55.6
50.0
36.4
44.4
Radiodiagnosis
33.8
33.8
24.1
25.9
40.9
Rehabilitation medicine
63.2
63.2
62.5
25.9
69.2
Sexual health medicine
..
..
..
..
100.0
Surgery
13.5
13.5
16.5
15.2
(a)19.5
Total
40.7
41.2
40.7
41.0
39.0
Female new fellows
667
697
682
925
935

(a) Includes new Australian fellows only.

Source: Medical colleges

Over the period 2005 to 2009, the proportion of female new fellows remained relatively stable overall at around two-fifths of all new fellows and the picture was roughly the same for the five larger states (Table 4.34). However, the proportion of female new fellows varied significantly in the smaller jurisdictions, on occasion by up to 25% from one year to the next. Changes in smaller jurisdictions should be treated with caution due to the relatively low numbers of new fellows each year.

Table 4.34: Proportion of female new fellows by state/territory, 2005–2009

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NSWVicQldSAWATasNTACTAust
2005
42.5
39.4
36.8
41.4
41.3
57.1
30.0
50.0
40.7
2006
44.0
41.0
38.6
44.8
33.7
40.0
27.3
50.0
41.2
2007
40.5
41.3
40.1
41.7
40.0
43.3
45.5
26.7
40.7
2008
41.1
41.4
41.3
36.6
41.5
38.8
40.0
52.2
40.9
2009
41.3
42.7
37.8
42.3
40.0
61.7
44.0
34.1
39.2

Source: Medical colleges

New Fellows by Subspecialty – Selected Colleges

A number of the larger medical colleges have also provided data on new fellows, broken down by subspecialty. Pathology, physician and surgical subspecialties are presented in Tables 4.35 to 4.38 respectively.

Pathology Subspecialties

Table 4.35: Pathology subspecialties: New fellows and females by subspecialty, 2009

SubspecialtyNew fellowsFemale new fellowsProportion female (%)
Anatomical pathology
30
15
50.0
Chemical pathology
3
1
33.3
Forensic pathology
2
2
100.0
Haematology
20
7
35.0
Immunology
1
0
0.0
Microbiology
7
5
71.4
Genetics
1
0
-
Total
64
30
46.9

Source: RCPA

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Physician Subspecialties

Table 4.36: Adult medicine subspecialties: New fellows and females by subspecialty(a), 2009

SubspecialtyNew fellowsFemale new fellowsProportion female (%)
Cardiology
56
13
23.2
Clinical genetics
1
1
100.0
Clinical Pharmacology
0
0
-
Endocrinology
19
12
63.2
Endocrinology and Chemical Pathology
1
1
100.0
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
34
9
26.5
General medicine
18
5
27.8
Geriatric medicine
31
13
41.9
Haematology
16
8
50.0
Immunology and Allergy
3
3
100.0
Infectious diseases
14
6
42.9
Infectious diseases and Microbiology
3
3
100.0
Intensive Care medicine
1
0
-
Medical oncology
25
11
44.0
Nephrology
17
7
41.2
Neurology
12
4
33.3
Nuclear medicine
8
3
37.5
Palliative medicine(b)
9
7
77.8
Respiratory and Sleep medicine
22
7
31.8
Rheumatology
5
4
80.0
Total
295
117
39.7

(a) Does not include overseas trained specialists or those based in New Zealand.
(b) This figure refers to FRACP only and not fellows of the Chapter (FAChPM) program.

Source: RACP

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Table 4.37: Paediatric and child health subspecialties: New fellows and females by subspecialty(a), 2009

SubspecialtyNew fellowsFemale new fellowsProportion female (%)
Cardiology
2
0
-
Clinical genetics
2
1
50.0
Clinical Pharmacology
0
0
-
Community child health
2
2
100.0
Endocrinology
4
3
75.0
Gastroenterology
3
1
33.3
General paediatrics
38
23
60.5
Haematology
1
0
-
Immunology and Allergy
3
0
-
Infectious Diseases
2
1
50.0
Intensive Care medicine
0
0
-
Medical oncology
6
3
50.0
Neonatal/Perinatal medicine
8
3
37.5
Nephrology
0
0
-
Neurology
2
0
-
Nuclear medicine
0
0
-
Paediatric emergency medicine
4
0
-
Palliative medicine(b)
0
0
-
Respiratory and Sleep medicine
0
0
-
Rheumatology
5
0
-
Total
82
37
45.1

(a) Does not include overseas trained specialists.
(b) This figure refers to FRACP only and not fellows of the Chapter (FAChPM) program.

Source: RACP

Surgical Subspecialties

Table 4.38: Surgical subspecialties: New fellows and females(a) by subspecialty, 2009

SubspecialtyNew fellowsFemale new fellowsProportion female (%)
Cardiothoracic surgery
5
0
-
General surgery
60
19
31.7
Neurosurgery
8
2
25.0
Orthopaedic surgery
52
2
3.8
Otolaryngology, head and neck surgery
13
3
23.1
Paediatric surgery
3
1
33.3
Plastic and reconstructive surgery
9
3
33.3
Urology
15
3
20.0
Vascular surgery
9
1
11.1
Total
174
34
19.5

(a) Includes Australian fellows only. Total new fellows was 212. Total new female fellows for the college was 41.

Source: RACS