Medical Training Review Panel: thirteenth report

New College Fellows

Page last updated: April 2010

Current Data

In 2008, there were 2,257 new fellows in medical colleges. Of these, 925 or 41.0% were female (Table 4.26).

The state and territory distribution of new fellows does not capture those new fellows residing overseas.

Table 4.26: New fellows and proportion of females by medical specialty, 2008.

Medical specialty

New fellows

Proportion all new fellows (%)

Females

Proportion females (%)

Adult medicine(a)30313.412641.6
Anaesthesia(b)23410.48235.0
Pain medicine(c)110.519.1
Dermatology110.51090.9
Emergency medicine954.23536.8
General practice
RACGP81936.336744.8
ACRRM221.0731.8
Intensive care(d)622.71625.8
Medical administration100.4550.0
Obstetrics and Gynaecology662.94162.1
Occupational and Environmental medicine110.5545.5
Ophthalmology(e)140.6535.7
Paediatrics(a)1145.16456.1
Pathology683.03551.5
Psychiatry1476.56242.2
Public health medicine130.6969.2
Radiation oncology110.5436.4
Radiodiagnosis542.41425.9
Rehabilitation medicine210.91152.4
Surgery1717.62615.2

Total

2,257

100.0

925

41.0

(a) Includes overseas trained specialists.
(b) 181 new fellows resided in Australia.
(c) Of 15 fellows admitted by examination and training in 2008, 11 are domiciled in Australia.
(d) Includes 13 fellows (3 females) who have returned overseas.
(e) RANZCO numbers include overseas trained specialists with new fellows for the first time. Also, the number of trainees is significantly reduced in this reporting year due to commencement of a 5-year rather than a 4-year training program.

Source: Medical colleges



Data on where new fellows resided is shown in Table 4.27

Table 4.27: New fellows by medical specialty and state/territory

Medical specialty

NSW

Vic

Qld

SA

WA

Tas

NT

ACT

Aust

Adult medicine(a)10881411921766289
Anaesthesia5040452114713181
Pain medicine1241300011
Dermatology4402100011
Emergency medicine2032294810195
General practice
RACGP(b)229193172(c)1079424nana819
ACRRM8051502122
Intensive care1514124300149
Medical administration1090000010
Obstetrics and Gynaecology1715185722066
Occupational and Environmental medicine1250300011
Opthalmology(d)25502000(e)14
Paediatrics(a)232816723122102
Pathology20181241010368
Psychiatry4136291421303147
Public health medicine2221401113
Radiation oncology5411000011
Radiodiagnosis2110116510054
Rehabilitation medicine12420300021
Surgery5553231619212171

Total

635

543

441

213

246

49

15

23

2,165

(a) Includes overseas trained specialists now based in Australia.
(b) Includes ACT fellows.
(c) Includes NT fellows.
(d) RANZCO numbers include overseas trained specialists with new fellows for the first time. Also, the number of trainees is significantly reduced in this reporting year due to commencement of a 5-year rather than a 4-year training program.
(e) Includes 10 overseas trained specialists.

Source: Medical colleges



The distribution across states and territories of female new fellows follows a similar pattern to the distribution of all new fellows (Table 4.28).

Table 4.28: Female new fellows by medical specialty and state/territory, 2008.

Medical specialty

NSW

Vic

Qld

SA

WA

Tas

NT

ACT

Aust

Adult medicine(a)443420410214119
Anaesthesia1312175431156
Pain medicine001000001
Dermatology4401100010
Emergency medicine910123100035
General practice
RACGP(d)1149174(e)433510nana367
ACRRM102120017
Intensive care3341100113
Medical administration104000005
Obstetrics and Gynaecology711104612041
Occupational and Environmental medicine111020005
Ophthalmology(b)22100000(c)5
Paediatrics(a)1220941302060
Pathology8773710235
Psychiatry2015114910262
Public health medicine11213--19
Radiation oncology310000004
Radiodiagnosis24413---14
Rehabilitation medicine7210100011
Surgery9723410026

Total

261

225

182

78

102

19

6

12

885

(a) Includes overseas trained specialists now based in Australia.
(b) RANZCO numbers include overseas trained specialists with new fellows for the first time. Also, the number of trainees is significantly reduced in this reporting year due to commencement of a 5-year rather than a 4-year training program.
(c) Total includes 4 overseas trained specialists.
(d) Includes ACT fellows.
(e) Includes NT fellows.

Source: Medical colleges



Trends

Between 2004 and 2008, the number of new fellows has almost doubled, increasing by 704 (45.3%) (Table 4.29). Adult medicine had the largest increase in terms of sheer numbers, with 303 new fellows in 2008 compared to 190 in 2004, while new fellow numbers tripled in intensive care (210% increase) and paediatrics doubled.

Dermatology, medical administration and ophthalmology were the only areas with lesser number of new fellows in 2008 than in 2004. It should be noted that the numbers in each were relatively small and varied considerably across years.

Appendix D provides further data back to 2000 on new fellows.

Table 4.29: New fellows by medical specialty, 2004-2008

Medical specialty

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Increase 2004-2008 (%)

Adult medicine(a)19018124720930359.5
Anaesthesia12819813515023482.8
Pain medicine..55711..
Dermatology1213142311-8.3
Emergency medicine805878699518.8
General practice
RACGP66167162859281923.9
ACRRM......2122..
Intensive care2029233662210.0
Medical administration154131110-33.3
Obstetrics and Gynaecology2928494666127.6
Occupational and Environmental medicine66661183.3
Ophthalmology2026163014-30.0
Paediatrics(a)57747347114100.0
Pathology414846776865.9
Public health medicine8413151362.5
Psychiatry10985907214734.9
Radiation oncology10199121110.0
Radiodiagnosis373974545445.9
Rehabilitation medicine151319242140.0
Surgery11515515517617148.7

Total

1,553

1,656

1,693

1,677

2,257

45.3

(a) Includes overseas trained specialists.

Source: Medical colleges



Table 4.30: New fellows by state/territory, 2004-2008

NSW

Vic

Qld

SA

WA

Tas

NT

ACT

(a)Aust

2004476414262161173234101,553
20055014343101571793510141,640
20065304683081651633011181,693
20075384703271511353011151,677
20086355434412132464915232,165

Increase 2004-2008 (%)

33.4

31.2

68.3

32.3

42.2

113.0

275.0

130.0

39.4

(a) 2005 and 2008 Australian totals differ from the sum of state/territory numbers due to the inclusion of new fellows who completed their training overseas.

Source: Medical colleges



The proportion of female new fellows has remained relatively constant over recent years, with just over two-fifths (41.0%) of new fellows each year being female (Table 4.31). Considerable variation is seen across specialities each year with only 9.1% of all new intensive care fellows
being female in 2008 compared to 44.8% of general practice new fellows and 90.9% of those in dermatology. Considerable variation is also seen from year to year within specialities.

Table 4.31: Proportion of female new fellows by medical specialty, 2004-2008

Medical specialty

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Proportion females (%)
Adult medicine38.436.836.838.341.6
Anaesthesia28.943.043.031.335.0
Pain medicine..40.040.00.09.1
Dermatology66.742.942.934.890.9
Emergency medicine42.531.330.833.336.8
General practice
RACGP46.846.846.850.044.8
ACRRM......14.331.8
Intensive care20.08.78.713.925.8
Medical administration53.330.830.827.350.0
Obstetrics and Gynaecology51.746.946.958.762.1
Occupational and Environmental medicine0.033.333.316.745.5
Ophthalmology50.031.331.350.035.7
Paediatrics64.945.245.257.456.1
Pathology45.065.265.253.251.5
Psychiatry45.948.154.443.142.2
Public health medicine62.585.784.680.069.2
Radiation oncology50.055.655.650.036.4
Radiodiagnosis37.833.833.824.125.9
Rehabilitation medicine40.063.263.262.525.9
Surgery6.113.513.516.515.2

Total

44.040.741.240.741.0
Female new fellows

683

667

697

682

925

Source: Medical colleges



The proportion of female new fellows ranged significantly across states and territories from 36.6% in South Australia to 52.2% in the ACT (Table 4.32). Over the period 2004–2008, the proportion of female new fellows decreased in all jurisdictions marginally, with the exception of Victoria,
which had a small increase. Changes in smaller jurisdictions should be treated with caution due to the relatively very low numbers of new fellows each year.

Table 4.32: Proportion of female new fellows by state/territory, 2004-2008

NSW

Vic

Qld

SA

WA

Tas

NT

ACT

Aust

Proportion females (%)
200446.640.145.838.544.552.250.080.044.0
200542.539.436.841.441.357.130.050.040.7
200644.041.038.644.833.740.027.350.041.2
200740.541.340.141.740.043.345.526.740.7
200841.141.441.336.641.538.840.052.240.9

Source: Medical colleges



Selected Colleges - New Fellows by Subspeciality

Data is available from a number of the larger colleges, broken down by subspecialty. This is presented in Tables 4.33 to 4.36.

Pathology subspecialities

Table 4.33: Pathology subspecialties: New fellows and females by subspeciality, 2008

Subspecialty

New fellows

Females

Proportion females (%)

Anatomical pathology271244.4
Chemical pathology3266.7
Forensic pathology2150.0
Haematology221359.1
Immunology5120.0
Microbiology9666.7

Total

68

35

51.5

Source: RCPA



Physician subspecialties

Table 4.34: Adult medicine subspecialties: New fellows and females by subspecialty, 2008(a)

Subspecialty

New fellows

Females

Proportion females (%)

Cardiology431432.6
Clinical genetics00 -
Clinical Pharmacology20 -
Endocrinology201470.0
Gastroenterology and Hepatology321031.3
General medicine6466.7
Geriatric medicine191157.9
Haematology21838.1
Immunology and Allergy6116.7
Infectious diseases13538.5
Intensive care500.0
Medical oncology302066.7
Nephrology171058.8
Neurology18738.9
Nuclear medicine20 -
Palliative medicine11100.0
Respiratory and Sleep medicine21838.1
Rheumatology12650.0

Total

268

119

44.4

(a) Table does not include overseas trained specialists.

Source: RACP



Table 4.35: Paediatric and child health subspecialties: New fellows and females by subspecialty, 2008(a)

Subspecialty

New fellows

Females

Proportion females (%)

Cardiology20 -
Clinical genetics11100.0
Clinical Pharmacology00 -
Community child health44100.0
Endocrinology2150.0
Gastroenterology200.0
General Medicine00 -
General paediatrics533464.2
Haematology100.0
Immunology and Allergy3266.7
Infectious Diseases00 -
Intensive care00 -
Medical oncology20 -
Neonatal/Perinatal medicine10440.0
Nephrology11100.0
Neurology02 -
Nuclear Medicine00 -
Paediatric emergency medicine9666.7
Palliative medicine00 -
Respiratory and Sleep Medicine3133.3
Rheumatology00 -

Total

96

58

60.4

(a) This table does not include overseas trained specialists

Source: RACP



Surgical subspecialties

Table 4.36: Surgical subspecialties: New fellows and females by subspecialty, 2008

Subspecialty

New fellows

Females

Proportion females (%)

Cardiothoracic surgery70 -
General surgery581119.0
Neurosurgery16425.0
Orthapedic surgery3712.7
Otolaryngology, head and neck surgery12433.3
Paediatric surgery20 -
Plastic and reconstructive surgery18316.7
Urology16212.5
Vascular surgery5120.0

Total

171

26

15.2

Source: RACS