Private Hospital Data Collection Review Final Report

2.3 Private hospital licensing and data collection

2.3 Private Hospital Data Collection Review - Final Report

Page last updated: 14 June 2012

This section summarises the licensing regimes for private hospitals in each State and Territory, as well as the Commonwealth legislative basis for declaring private hospitals. It focuses on the data reporting and submission requirements imposed by the different licensing arrangements. The following sections provide detail of the licensing requirements for private hospitals for the Commonwealth, States and Territories.

2.3.1   Commonwealth private hospital declaration

A private hospital can be declared as such by the (delegate of the) Commonwealth Minister for Health and Ageing, under the Private Health Insurance Act 2007. Declaration enables a private hospital to receive payments of health benefits from health insurers, following treatment of insured patients.

The Department administers the declaration process. As part of that process, the Department collects the following information when a hospital is declared:

  • facility name;
  • ownership arrangements;
  • name of Chief Executive Officer;
  • date facility opened;
  • address and contact details;
  • geographic area;
  • category of hospital45
  • number of beds; (up to 5 categories);
  • type of hospital46
  • classes of clinical services offered by the hospital47
  • accreditation details;
  • whether the facility is co-located with a public hospital; and
  • triage and emergency arrangements.
  • 45 There are 5 categories: Private Hospital; Privatised Public Hospital ; Hospital providing overnight treatment; Hospital providing overnight and day only treatment; Hospital providing day only treatment.
    46 There are 7 types: For Profit; Religious; Charitable; Community; Memorial; Bush Nursing; Other/Not For Profit.
    47 There are 42 classes: Addiction Dependency; Endoscopy; Neonatal Intensive Care Unit; Sleep Apnoea; AIDS/HIV; Epilepsy; Neurosurgical; Spinal; Burns; General Surgery; Obstetrics/Maternity; Surgical; Cardiac; Genetics; Oncology; Transplant; CCU; Geriatric Assessment Unit; Orthopaedics; Vascular; Chronic Disease Management; Gynaecology; Paediatric; Other Services (please list below); Day Surgery; High Dependency; Pain Management; Dental; Hospital in the Home; Palliative Care/ Hospice; Diabetes; Infectious Disease; Psychiatric; Dialysis; ICU; Rehabilitation; Ear Nose & Throat; IVF; Residential Aged Care Services; Emergency Department; Medical.

    There is no obligation on the private hospital to update or maintain this information once it has been collected by the Department at hospital declaration.

    The hospital declaration requirement and associated process also applies to public hospitals who wish to receive payments of health benefits for treating insured patients. However, there is no requirement to be declared under the Private Health Insurance Act 2007 for a hospital – either private or public – that does not wish to receive benefits’ payments.

    All private hospitals declared under this Act are required to submit HCP data to health insurers (see Section 2.1.1) and are required to submit PHDB data to the Department (see Section 2.1.2).

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    2.3.2   New South Wales

    Within NSW, private hospitals and day procedure centres must be licensed under the Private Health Facilities Act 2007 and the Private Health Facilities Regulation 201048. There are currently 18 prescribed classes of private health facilities49. Licensing is overseen by the Private Hospital Unit within NSW Health.

    48 Licensing Private Health Facilities. New South Wales Government.
    49 The 18 classes of service comprise anaesthesia; cardiac catheterisation; cardiac surgery; chemotherapy; emergency; gastrointestinal endoscopy; intensive care; interventional neuroradiology; maternity; medical; mental health; neonatal; paediatric; radiotherapy; rapid opioid detoxification; rehabilitation; renal dialysis; and surgical.

    The above legislation defines a private health facility in terms of the clinical nature of services provided by the facility. The range of clinical services that is prescribed as (potentially) being delivered by a private health facility is the same as the 18 service classes.

    Schedule 1 of the Private Health Facilities Regulation 2010 outlines the standards with which private hospitals must comply. Section 21 outlines that private hospitals must report adverse events to the Department. Under section 42 of the Act, a root cause analysis team should also be appointed for any such reportable incident. The licensee has 30 days after being provided with an incident report by the root cause analysis team, to forward a copy of the report to the Director General.

    In addition, the “licensee of a private health facility must conduct regular audits to ensure that the facility is complying with statutory requirements as well as the facility’s policies and procedures” 50.

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    50 Private Health Facilities Regulation, 2010. New South Wales.

    Under the Act and Regulation, the Private Health Care Unit monitors and ensures compliance with licensing standards. This includes regular onsite visits, paper audits, telephone or written contact. After each audit, reports are made to facilities and the Unit conducts follow up work to ensure recommendations have been implemented51.

    51 Monitoring Activities. New South Wales Government.

    Licensed private hospitals are also required to submit data monthly to the NSW Health Inpatient Statistics Collection (NSWISC), as specified in Policy Directive 2005/17552. The data submitted by private hospitals to NSWISC forms the basis of the admitted patient data submitted by NSW Health to the AIHW for inclusion in the APC (see Section 2.1.3).

    52 Register of Patients - ISC - Private Hospitals/Private Data Procedure Centres from 1 July 2000. New South Wales Government.

    2.3.3   Victoria

    The Department of Health is responsible for the regulation of private hospitals and day procedure centres under the Health Services Act 1988 and the Health Services (Private Hospitals and Day Procedure Centres) Regulations 2002. This legislation mandates the minimum requirements for the quality and safety of care delivered to patients in private hospitals and day procedure centres53. A private hospital or day procedure centre cannot commence or continue operation and admission of patients unless the premises are registered under this legislation. Applications for renewal of registrations must be made three months in advance of expiry.

    53 Private Hospitals and Day Procedure Centres in Victoria. Department of Health Victoria.

    The above legislation defines a private hospital in terms of the services it provides54 and the fact that those services are provided for a charge. It also defines a day procedure centre in similar terms, with the additional criterion that patients “are reasonably expected to be admitted and discharged on the same date” 55.

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    54 The legislation requires a private hospital to provide one or more of medical health services, surgical health services or specialty health services. Specialty health services comprise one or more of artificial insemination; assisted reproductive treatment; cardiac services; emergency medicine; endoscopy; intensive care; mental health services; neonatal services; obstetrics; oncology (chemotherapy); oncology (radiation therapy); renal dialysis; and specialist rehabilitation services.
    55 Health Services Act 1988. Victorian Government.

    The Department’s Policy Instruments and Compliance Unit conducts regular on-site assessments of registered facilities. The inspection process begins with the proprietor completing a comprehensive self-assessment tool that incorporates legislative requirements, relevant professional standards, relevant guidelines, current best practice and occupational health and safety issues. The self-assessment tool is reviewed by the Policy Instruments and Compliance Unit prior to a scheduled inspection, the results of which are used to inform both the inspection plan and information gathering at the time of inspection.

    Inspections of each registered private hospital and day procedure centre are undertaken at a minimum of once every two years. However, each facility is assessed against a risk-rated matrix and that matrix indicates whether more frequent regulatory inspections are required56. Information collected through the inspection is used by the Department’s authorised officers to inform the Secretary on the standards of health care services provided against criteria set out in the above regulations. Results of the inspection are used to inform the Secretary of the Victorian Department of Health whether to renew a registration or whether to place additional conditions on the registration. As a standard, registrations remain valid for a period of two years.

    56 Health care quality and safety monitoring in Victoria. The Victorian Quality Council, Safety and Quality in Health. April 2011.

    As specified in the Health Services (Private Hospitals and Day Procedure Centres) Regulation 2002, private hospitals and day procedure centres are required to submit episode level data to the Department of Health in Victoria for every separation (completed admitted patient episode).

    These data are stored in the Victorian Admitted Episode Dataset (VAED) and form the basis of the admitted patient data submitted by Victoria to the AIHW for inclusion in the APC (see Section 2.1.3).

    External reporting of sentinel events is not mandated for the private hospital sector in Victoria. However, some private hospitals contribute data on quality and safety performance to state databases, including hospital-acquired infection data contributed to the Victorian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System (VICNISS). This reporting commenced from 2009 and private hospitals participate on a voluntary basis.

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    2.3.4   Queensland

    Private hospitals within Queensland are licensed under the Private Health Facilities Act 1999 which “empowers the Chief Health Officer to make standards for the protection of the health and well being of patients receiving health services at private health facilities” 57. Queensland has a Clinical Services Capability Framework for Licensed Private Health Facilities that specifies support services, staff profiles and minimum safety standards that should be met by private health facilities to ensure safe and appropriate supported clinical services58.

    57 Role of Private Health Regulation. Queensland Health.
    58 Clinical Services Capability Framework for Public and Licensed Private Health Facilities, Version 3.0, Fundamentals of the Framework. Queensland Government.

    The above Act defines a private hospital and a day hospital separately. Both are defined as a facility that delivers health services, with a health service defined as “a service provided to a person for maintaining, improving or restoring the person’s health and wellbeing”. A private hospital is defined as a facility that provides health services to people who are admitted and discharged on separate days, and the facility is not a public hospital nor a nursing home, hostel or other residential nursing care facility. A day hospital is defined as a facility that provides health services to people who are admitted and discharged on the same day and which is not run by the State.

    The Private Health Facilities Act 1999 requires licensees of private health facilities to submit reports to the Chief Health Officer on a six monthly basis. The purposes of these reports are to:

    • monitor the quality of health services provided at private health facilities;
    • enable the State to give information to the Commonwealth or another State under agreements prescribed under section 147 of the Act; and
    • monitor the general state of health of the public having regard to the types and numbers of health services provided at the facilities.

    Reporting obligations include sentinel events (as defined by the Act) within 48 hours and for some events, a root cause analysis is required. On a six monthly basis, hospitals are also required to report adverse outcomes’ data. This is used by Queensland Health to identify any aspects of the health service provision that may require closer scrutiny and monitoring59.

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    59 Private Health Reports. Queensland Government.

    A self-audit tool has been developed to allow hospitals to assess their individual compliance with the Private Health Regulations.

    Additional reporting requirements are imposed on licensed private hospitals through the Health Quality and Complaints Commission Act 2006. Under this Act, the Health Quality and Complaints Commission (HQCC) has developed a set of 9 healthcare standards that apply to all licensed private hospitals and day hospitals in Queensland60. These standards include an obligation to demonstrate improvement in quality of care via reporting against 89 indicators. The responses required for the indicators are a mixture of numbers and Yes/No responses.

    60 Healthcare Standards Reporting Guide, Version 2.0, Updated 9 November 2010. Health Quality and Complaints Commission. The 9 standards are: Providers’ duty to improve health services; Credentialing and scope of clinical practice; Complaints management; Review of hospital-related deaths; Management of acute myocardial infarction on and following discharge or transfer; Reducing the risk of venous thrombo-embolism; Ensuring correct patient, site, side and procedure; Hand hygiene; Appropriate use of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis.

    There is scope for Queensland Health to share data reported the Chief Health Officer with the HQCC but only if the private hospital concerned provides its consent to do so.

    In addition to these quality and safety reporting requirements, private hospitals in Queensland are required to provide data to the Queensland Health Admitted Patient Data Collection (QHAPDC) and to the Queensland Health Monthly Activity Collection (QHMAC). These requirements are mandated by the Private Health Facilities Act 1999. The data submitted by private hospitals to QHAPDC forms the basis of the admitted patient data submitted by Queensland Health to the AIHW for inclusion in the APC (see Section 2.1.3). The QHMAC data are used by Queensland Health to fulfil its reporting obligations under the Australian Healthcare Agreements61.

    61 Monthly Activity Collection Manual, Private Facilities. Queensland Health, July 2010.

    As and when private hospitals and day facilities update their details, Queensland Health advises the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing of the changes.

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    2.3.5   South Australia

    Within South Australia, the Health Care Regulations 2008 and the Health Care Act 2008 specify the regulations that govern the licensing of private hospitals62. Day hospitals are not required to hold a licence.

    62 Health Care Regulations 2008. South Australia.

    The above Act defines the concept of a health service and then defines a hospital as an entity that provides health services including health services provided on a live-in basis. A private hospital is then defined as a hospital that is not incorporated under the Act itself. In effect, this means that day hospitals are not defined as a private hospital for the purposes of the South Australian legislation and so are not subject to the State’s private hospital licensing arrangements.

    South Australia adopts a minimalist approach to private hospital licensing, with no routine data submission requirements imposed through the licensing arrangements. Nonetheless, all private hospitals (as defined by the above Act) and almost all private day hospitals in South Australia submit admitted episode data to the Integrated South Australian Activity Collection (ISAAC) on a monthly basis. This data submission is voluntary and has been taking place since the early 1990s. The data submitted by private hospitals and day hospitals to ISAAC forms the basis of the admitted patient data submitted by SA Health to the AIHW for inclusion in the APC (see Section 2.1.3).<

    On an annual basis, licensed private hospitals are required to provide SA Health with an annual return, which incorporates data on selected establishment characteristics. The data required are outlined within Schedule Two of the Health Care Act 2008 and include facility name and address, ownership and management details, bed numbers, clinical services63, changes in facilities offered, and changes in diagnostic equipment used. Under the terms of the license, private hospitals are subject to inspections.

    63 The return requires the private hospital to nominate whether the range of services provided has changed and specifically whether it operates any of coronary care unit; neonatal intensive care unit; intensive care unit; high dependency unit; renal dialysis; or rehabilitation.

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    2.3.6   Western Australia

    Private hospitals and day hospitals are licensed within Western under the legislative framework provided by the Hospitals and Health Services Act 1927, the Hospitals (Licensing and Conduct of Private Hospitals) Regulations 1987, the Hospitals and Health Services (Day Hospital Facility) Determination 2005, and the Hospitals and Health Services (Day Hospital Facility) Determination (No. 2) 2005.

    Under this legislation, a private hospital and a day hospital are defined separately. A hospital is defined as a “an institution for the reception and treatment of persons suffering from illness or injury, or in need of medical, surgical or dental treatment or assistance, and includes a maternity home or maternity hospital, day hospital facility, nursing home or nursing post” 64. A private hospital is then defined as a hospital that is not a public hospital.

    64 Hospitals and Health Services Act 1927. Western Australian Government.

    A day hospital is defined as premises that are separate from a hospital (as defined in the Hospitals and Health Services Act 1927), do not provide overnight accommodation, and provide one or more of a prescribed set of services. The services prescribed for day hospitals comprise:

    • any procedure involving general, spinal or epidural anaesthetic65;
    • any procedure performed under sedation, plexus blockade or Biers Block64;
    • any procedure involving the invasion of a sterile body cavity64;
    • peritoneal dialysis and haemodialysis for the treatment of end stage renal failure64; and
    • multidisciplinary day programs for psychiatric treatment of patients with mental illness66.

    65 Hospitals and Health Services (Day Hospital Facility) Determination 2005.
    66 Hospitals and Health Services (Day Hospital Facility) Determination (No. 2) 2005.

    In applying for a licence, applicants are requested to provide a range of establishment data that is entered into a central database within the Licensing Standards and Review Unit of WA Health. This includes; facility and licence applicant details; clinical specialities and number of beds67. Under any licence that is subsequently granted, any changes to the standing data should be notified to the Unit within 24 hours.

    67 Application for License under the Hospitals and Health Services Act 1927. Licensing Standards and Review Unit, Department of Health, Western Australia, 2009.

    The licence that is issued clearly stipulates the conditions under which it is granted. This includes the number of beds, classes of patients that can be treated, number and categories of staff. On an annual basis, each licensed facility is subject to an inspection before the licence is renewed. This includes verification of standing data and operations against the conditions of the licence. On renewal of the licence, WA Health provides the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing with a copy, which can be used to update the Department’s records.

    Under the terms and conditions of private hospitals’ and day hospitals’ licences, licence holders must comply with WA Health policies. These include sentinel events68; critical incidents and mortality review69.

    68 Sentinel Event Policy. Office of Safety and Quality in Healthcare, WA Health.
    69 Review of mortality: Policy and Guidelines for Reviewing Inpatient Deaths. Office of Safety and Quality in Healthcare, WA Health.

    Licensed private hospitals and day hospitals also are required, under licence conditions, to submit data on admitted patients to the WA Hospital Morbidity Data System (HMDS)70. These data are required to be submitted monthly and form the basis for the data provided by WA Health to the AIHW for inclusion in the APC (see Section 2.1.3).

    70 Hospital Morbidity Data System: Reference manual, July 2010. WA Health.

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    2.3.7   Tasmania

    In Tasmania, private hospitals and private day hospitals are licensed under the Hospitals Act 1918. However, the Health Service Establishments Bill is currently before the Tasmanian Parliament and will repeal and replace the Hospitals Act 1918, once passed. This section presents the details of the licensing regime proposed under that Bill. The Bill itself specifies the requirements for licensing and arrangements for the safety, quality and standards imposed on services provided by private health establishments.

    The Health Service Establishments Bill specifies the scope of services provided by private health establishments in terms of the clinical nature of the services and the need for supervision or specific delivery by a registered medical practitioner, a registered nurse with obstetric qualifications, a registered dental practitioner, or by a registered podiatrist. The Act then classifies such services into 3 types:

    • Type A procedures – those requiring admitted overnight hospital stay;
    • Type B procedures – those usually requiring admitted treatment without an overnight stay; and
    • Type C procedures – those not usually requiring admitted treatment.

    A facility where Type A procedures are undertaken for fee, gain or reward are required to be licensed as a private hospital under the above Bill, while a facility where Type B procedures are undertaken but no Type A procedures, is required to be licensed as a day procedure centre. The Secretary of the Tasmanian Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) is also empowered to require a health establishment that does not deliver Type A nor Type B services to be licensed as either a private hospital or a day procedure centre, should considerations of public safety and service quality warrant so doing.

    Once licensed, there are no explicit statutory reporting requirements for private hospitals, although the Health Service Establishments Bill empowers the Secretary of the DHHS to require licensed private hospitals and day procedure centres to provide “any information that…is required for the purposes of this Act”. It also allows for the making of regulations specifically to require a licensee to submit “to the Secretary ... a copy of the register of patients for the establishment”.

    In effect, such a regulation would require private hospitals and day procedure centres to submit data to the DHHS admitted episode collection. Nonetheless, currently Tasmanian private hospitals and day hospitals do submit data to this collection, on a voluntary basis. These data form the basis for the data provided by DHHS to the AIHW for inclusion in the APC (see Section 2.1.3).

    Establishment level data, such as bed numbers and theatre types, is collected by DHHS through the licence application and approval process, and is required to be updated as and when such details change. DHHS provides this information to the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing on an exception basis (that is, when there is a change to the licensee’s details).

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    2.3.8   Northern Territory

    In NT, private hospitals are licensed under the Private Hospitals Act. This Act specifies the requirements for licensing and arrangements for the management and inspection of private hospitals.

    The Private Hospitals Act defines a private hospital in terms of the provision of prescribed medical or surgical treatment for fee or reward. There is no separate definition or classification of a day hospital or similar concept. The Act describes prescribed medical or surgical treatment as involving high risk procedures that are prescribed by regulation. However, the necessary regulations are yet to be presented to the NT Parliament71.

    71 The Private Hospitals Act was created by the passage of the Private Hospitals and Nursing Homes Amendment Act 2011, which passed through the NT Parliament on 3 May 2011 and commenced on 20 May 2011. The NT Legislative Assembly rose on 5 May 2011 and was scheduled to resume sitting on 23 June 2011.

    Once licensed, there are no explicit statutory reporting requirements for private hospitals. However, the Chief Health Officer of NT Health is empowered to require a licensee to provide details of any birth or death that occurs in the private hospital.

    The Private Hospitals Act requires annual inspection of each licensed private hospital. As a part of that inspection, the Act empowers the Chief Health Officer’s authorised inspector to inspect the “register of patients” that the hospital is required to maintain. This register contains patient, clinical and administrative data for each admitted patient episode.

    Nonetheless, currently one NT private hospital submits data to the NT admitted episode collection, on a voluntary basis. No private day hospitals do so. These data form the basis for the data provided by NT Health to the AIHW for inclusion in the APC (see Section 2.1.3).

    Establishment level data, such as bed numbers and theatre types, is collected by NT Health through the licence application and approval process, and is required to be updated as and when such details change.

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    2.3.9   Australian Capital Territory

    In the ACT, private hospitals are licensed under the Public Health Act 1997. Under that Act, the operation of a private hospital is classified as a public health risk activity, requiring licensing. Private hospital licences are issued under the ACT Healthcare Facilities Code of Practice 2001, which is an enforceable code of practice under the Public Health Act 1997.

    The Code of Practice applies to all healthcare facilities, both public and private, that provide prescribed medical and dental procedures. The Code defines prescribed medical and dental procedures as comprising one or more of:

    • administration of a general, spinal, epidural or major regional block anaesthetic or intravenous sedative for the purpose of performing an elective procedure, not including mandibular blocks;
    • endoscopy;
    • dialysis, haemofiltration or haemoperfusion;
    • prolonged intravenous infusion of a single cytotoxic agent or sequential intravenous infusion of more than one cytotoxic agent; or
    • cardiac catheterisation.

    The Code also applies to all healthcare facilities that provide overnight accommodation to patients prior to or after medical treatment.

    The concept of a day hospital is defined in the Health Act 1997, which defines a day hospital as a hospital where a person admitted for medical or surgical treatment is discharged on the same day.

    This licensing framework does not require healthcare facilities to provide information to ACT Health, other than our requirement to notify ACT Health of serious incidents within 24 hours of their happening, and a requirement for producing a publicly available annual report.

    Nonetheless, some ACT private hospitals voluntarily provide admitted episode data to ACT Health. Private day hospitals are the exception, with none of these providing data. These data form the basis for the data provided by NT Health to the AIHW for inclusion in the APC (see Section 2.1.3).

    Similarly to South Australia, ACT adopts a "light touch" approach to private hospital licensing. Private hospital details are checked and updated as necessary on an annual basis, at around the time that the admitted episode data are due to be provided to the AIHW. The facility level details held by ACT health cover such things as facility ownership and contact details, range of clinical services offered, accreditation, held, and compliance with certain public health procedural requirements.

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    2.3.10   Summary

    Table 4 summarises the licensing requirements within the States and Territories, in terms of the types of facilities that require licensing; the classes of service that each facility can be licensed to provide, reporting requirements determined by the licence, and whether or not the jurisdiction provides licence details to the Department. It does not cover statutory reporting obligations unrelated to the licensing arrangements, such as the requirements to report to cancer registries and perinatal statistics units.

    Table 5 summarises the different approaches to defining private hospitals and Day hospitals within each State and Territory.

    From the foregoing descriptions of licensing arrangements, it is clear that the concepts of private hospital and day hospital, while broadly similar across borders, differ substantially in terms of how they are specifically defined. The most extreme example of this is South Australia where the notion of a day hospital is not defined at all within the licensing arrangements.

    There is also substantial variation in the range and nature of facility level details captured through licensing application and renewal processes. In particular, the information captured on service profiles varies significantly among jurisdictions.

    The level of reporting and data submission expected of private hospitals also varies significantly among States and Territories. At one extreme, Queensland imposes significant reporting burdens across a range of operational areas. While at the other extreme South Australia imposes very little in the way of legislated reporting requirements.

    This variation is evident in terms of expectations around admitted episode data. Some jurisdictions require submission of admitted episode data from private hospitals and Day hospitals either as a condition of licence or as a statutory requirement. Others rely on voluntary submission of such data by the private sector.

    No jurisdiction has a formal arrangement in place with the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing to provide the latter with updates to licence details for private hospitals and Day hospitals that they license. Informal arrangements operate for two jurisdictions.

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    Table 4 Summary of legislative requirements by State and Territory.

    Jurisdiction Facilities licensed Service classes Reporting requirements Data provided to DoHA
    New South Wales • Private Hospitals
    • Day facilities
    In addition, there are eighteen prescribed classes of private health facilities72
    16 classes of service73 • Adverse Events
    • Root Cause Analysis
    • Regular audit
    • Admitted Patient Collection
    No
    Victoria • Private Hospitals
    • Day facilities
    15 classes of service74 • Self-audit tool
    • Episode level data
    • Admitted Patient Collection
    No
    Queensland • Private Hospitals
    • Day facilities
    42 classes of service75 • Sentinel events
    • Root Cause Analysis
    • Adverse outcome
    data on six monthly basis
    • Self-audit tool
    • Admitted Patient Collection
    Informally
    South Australia • Private Hospitals, excluding day facilities 6 classes of service76 • Provision of documents for inspections No
    Western Australia • Private Hospitals
    • Day facilities A-D
    • Private nursing posts
    • Private Psychiatric Nursing Hostels
    • Private Nursing homes
    34 classes of service77 • Sentinel events
    • Root Cause Analysis
    • Mortality Review
    • Inpatient statistics
    Informally
    Tasmania • Private hospitals
    • Day hospitals
    Three types of service, based on admitted status and overnight stay status • Nil No
    Northern Territory • Private hospitals, including day hospitals Unknown78 • Unknown78 No
    Australian Capital Territory • Healthcare facilities, including public, private and day hospitals 10 types of service79 • Notifiable incidents
    • Annual report
    No

    72 Anaesthesia; Cardiac catheterisation; Cardiac surgery; Chemotherapy; Emergency; Gastrointestinal Endoscopy; Intensive care; Interventional neuroradiology; Maternity; Medical; Mental health; Neonatal; Paediatric; Radiotherapy; Rapid detoxification; Rehabilitation; Renal dialysis; and Surgical.
    73 Anaesthesia; Intensive care; Paediatric; Cardiac catheterisation; Interventional neuroradiology; Radiotherapy; Cardiac surgery; Maternity; Rapid opioid detoxification; Chemotherapy; Medical Rehabilitation; Emergency; Mental health; Renal dialysis; Gastrointestinal endoscopy; Neonatal; and Surgical.
    74 Medical health services; Surgical health services; Speciality health services for the provision of; Artificial insemination; Assisted reproductive treatment; Cardiac Services; Emergency Medicine; Endoscopy; Intensive Care; Mental Health; Neonatal Services; Obstetrics; Oncology (Chemotherapy); Oncology (Radiation Therapy); Renal Dialysis; and Specialist Rehabilitation.
    75 Cardiothoracic Surgery; Colorectal Surgery; Coronary Care; Drug & Alcohol; Ear Nose & Throat; Gastrointestinal Surgery; General Medicine; General Surgery; Gynaecology; High Dependency; Hepatobiliary/Pancreatic Surgery; Hospice; Intensive Care; Intensive Care Post-Operative Maxillofacial Surgery; Mental Health; Mental Health – Secure; Neonatal Cots; Neurology; Neurosurgery; Obstetrics; Oncology; Oncology/Palliative Care; Ophthalmology; Orthopaedic; Otolaryngology Surgery; Paediatric Medicine; Paediatric Surgery; Palliative Care; Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery; Post Natal; Rehabilitation; Renal Medicine; Sleep Studies; Respiratory Medicine; Sub-Acute Medical; Thoracic Medicine; Thoracic Surgery; Unallocated; Urology; Vascular Surgery; Day Hospital Diagnostics; Day Hospital Primary Recovery and Day Hospital Treatment Bays.
    76 Coronary care unit; Neonatal intensive care unit; Intensive care unit; High dependency unit; Renal dialysis; Rehabilitation.
    77 Department of Health Western Australia, Licensing and Standards Review Unit, License Application, Medicine – Cardiology; Dermatology; Emergency medicine; Gastroenterology; Hepatology; General Medicine; Gerontology; Infectious disease; Intensive care; Medical Oncology; Nephrology; Neurology; Nuclear Medicine; Obstetrics; Gynaecology; Opthalmology; Paediatric Medicine; Palliative Medicine; Psychiatry; Rheumatology; Thoracic and sleep studies; Surgery – Cardiothoracic; colorectal; dental; Ear nose and Throat; General; Gynaecological; Neurosurgery; Oral/Maxillofacial; Major Orthopaedic; Minor Orthopaedic; Ophthalmic; Otolaryngology; Paediatric; Plastic; Urology; and Vascular.

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    Table 5 How private hospitals are defined, by jurisdiction.

    Jurisdiction Private hospital Day hospital
    New South Wales Facility delivering one or more of a set of specific services Facility delivering one or more of a set of specific services
    Victoria Facility delivering one or more of a set of specific clinical services, for a charge Facility delivering one or more of a set of specific clinical services, for a charge. Patients are expected to be admitted and discharged on the same day
    Queensland Facility delivering health services (generically defined) to patients admitted and discharged on different days. Facility delivering health services (generically defined) to patients admitted and discharged on the same day.
    South Australia Facility delivering health services (generically defined) to patients on a live in basis Not defined
    Western Australia Facility providing medical, surgical or dental treatment that is not a public hospital Facility separate to a hospital that provides one or more of a set of specific clinical services
    Tasmania Facility providing services requiring supervision of delivery by a registered health professional, to patients requiring admitted overnight stay Facility providing services requiring supervision of delivery by a registered health professional, to patients expected to be admitted and discharged on the same day
    Northern Territory A facility providing prescribed medical or surgical services for a charge A facility providing prescribed medical or surgical services for a charge
    Australian Capital Territory Facility delivering one or more of a set of specific clinical services, for a charge Facility delivering one or more of a set of specific clinical services, for a charge, and where patients are admitted and discharged on the same day

    78 Awaiting passage of regulations by NT Parliament.
    79 ACT Healthcare Facility Licence Application Form. The 10 service types are Overnight stays prior to, or after receiving medical treatment; Administration of a general anaesthetic; Spinal anaesthetic; Epidural anaesthetic; Major regional block anaesthetic not including mandibular blocks; Intravenous sedative; Endoscopy; Dialysis, haemofiltration or haemoperfusion; Prolonged intravenous infusion of a single cytotoxic agent or sequential intravenous infusion of more than one cytotoxic agent; and Cardiac catheterisation.