On World Hearing Day make a sound investment – get a hearing check-up

The ability to hear is something many of us take for granted and on World Hearing Day we are reminded to take care of our hearing health.

Page last updated: 03 March 2017

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3 March 2017

The ability to hear is something many of us take for granted and on World Hearing Day we are reminded to take care of our hearing health.

This year’s World Hearing Day theme — Action for hearing loss: make a sound investment — aims to highlight the economic impact of hearing loss and the cost effectiveness of hearing devices.

Minister for Aged Care and Minister for Indigenous Health, Ken Wyatt AM, MP, said that one in every six Australians has some form of hearing loss, and the figure is only going to increase as the population ages.

“By 2050, that rate is expected to rise to one in every four Australians,” he said.

“Hearing loss has the potential to affect a person’s independence, participation in community life and the ability to communicate with others. It also has financial implications.

“The Australian Government provides funding support for the Hearing Services Program so eligible people can access a range of fully or partially subsidised hearing services.

“In 2015-2016, almost 700,000 clients received help under the Hearing Services Program voucher system, with more than 1.3 million services delivered in total.

“All Australians should be vigilant about their health — especially with something as fundamental as hearing.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in remote areas can access outreach hearing services through Australian Hearing under the Community Services Obligations component of the program.

“In 2015-2016, more than 4,000 clients received 8,256 services.

“Children need good ear health to make the most of their education.

“A range of Australian Government programs provide clinical services, training and health promotion resources to improve ear health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

“In 2015-16, more than 42,000 clinical services were provided by health professionals through these programs.

“If you notice something different about your hearing, visit your local GP, because once hearing has been damaged it can never be fully repaired.”

For further information about Hearing Services, please visit your GP or view the Hearing Services Program website.

For more information contact Randal Markey, Media Adviser, 0417 318 620

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