Roadmap Roundtable considers next steps in aged care reform

The Minister for Aged Care, Ken Wyatt AM, MP, has met with about 100 aged-care consumers and providers to consider the Government’s next steps in the reform of Australia’s $16 billion aged care sector.

Page last updated: 23 February 2017

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23 February 2017

The Minister for Aged Care, Ken Wyatt AM, MP, met yesterday with about 100 aged-care consumers and providers to consider the Government’s next steps in the reform of Australia’s $16 billion aged care sector.

The meeting in Sydney – the Aged Care Roadmap Roundtable – was held to further the Government’s close co-operation with the aged care sector to ensure affordable, accessible and quality aged care for older Australians.

The Roadmap, released in April last year, was drawn up by the Aged Care Sector Committee, and it sets out short, medium and longer-term goals to make aged care consumer driven, market based and sustainable.

Mr Wyatt told the Roundtable that he supports the Roadmap, however, reform and the sequencing of reform were complex.

“I am keen to hear from you about how the Roadmap sits with your own experiences as aged-care providers and consumers,” he said.

“How can we work together to address any concerns? Working together is the key.

“Later this year, I will be considering the next steps in the Government’s reform agenda.

“I will be taking your views into consideration as we go into the development of the next phase of the reform process.”

Mr Wyatt said in the six years since the Productivity Commission’s 2011 Inquiry Report Caring for Older Australians there had been significant changes to deliver an aged-care sector that gave consumers more choice, raised the quality of care and was fiscally sustainable for Government and the community.

He said that innovation and technology would be a key to improving aged-care services in a market-driven environment.

Mr Wyatt said the aged-care sector would need to meet the expectations of older Australians for greater independence and to stay in their own homes and be connected to their communities for as long as possible.

“They also want quality care. And quality is not just about meeting minimum standards,” he said.

“Modern older Australians and their families – quite rightly – want quality of life. They also want to feel relaxed, secure and at ease, which means that their individual cultural and personal needs are acknowledged and accepted.”

Mr Wyatt said the aged-care sector had to make it “core business” to cater for people from diverse backgrounds – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, people with different gender and sexual preferences and people with mental illness.

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