Rural and Remote Health Needs Commitment

Rural and remote health is built on the commitment, the expertise and the courage of the rural and remote health workforce the Assistant Minister for Rural Health, Dr David Gillespie, told a symposium on rural and remote health research in Canberra.

Page last updated: 07 September 2016

PDF printable version of Rural and Remote Health Needs Commitment (PDF 291 KB)

7 September 2016

Rural and remote health is built on the commitment, the expertise and the courage of the rural and remote health workforce the Assistant Minister for Rural Health, Dr David Gillespie, told a symposium on rural and remote health research in Canberra.

Delivering the opening address at the National Rural Health Alliance’s 5th Rural and Remote Health Scientific Symposium Dr Gillespie said it takes a special kind of energy - a toughness and a boldness coupled with a deep sensitivity - to work in health in rural and remote areas.

“Without that kind of workforce we just can’t deliver healthcare to Australians in rural and remote areas.

“And by workforce I mean all the contributors - our doctors, our nurses, our Aboriginal Health workers, our midwives, our researchers, our scientists and social scientists, our specialists, our mental health workers, our ambulance drivers, aged care workers, cleaners, paramedical – everyone here at this conference,” Dr Gillespie said.

The ties to land and place, the industry, the hard work, the resilience, the humour, the courage – rural and remote communities in all their shapes and colours – are defined by these truly ‘Australian’ characteristics.

Dr Gillespie said the Federal Government is pursuing bold reforms that put patients at the centre of a system that is both equitable and sustainable while also working towards delivering an important election commitment, the appointment of a Rural Health Commissioner.

“The Commissioner will consult with stakeholders about the nursing and allied health workforce in rural and remote Australia.

“The Government is committed to building a health workforce that meets the needs of rural communities. One example of this is the Rural Health Multidisciplinary Training Program which ensures more doctors, nurses and allied health workers are being trained in rural and remote locations.

“We’ve also announced the Integrated Rural Training Pipeline. Nearly $94 million over four years has been allocated to develop an integrated, prevocational, postgraduate medical training pathway in rural and regional areas.

“We’ll have more health practitioners completing the different stages of their medical training, from student to specialist, in rural areas,” Dr Gillespie said.

Dr Gillespie’s address is available on the Department of Health’s website.

Media contact: Kay McNiece, 0412 132 585

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