Indigenous Aged Care Graduates to Help Meet Future Workforce Demands

More than 30 Indigenous aged care graduates are about to embark on a career in a priority industry, thanks to an Australian Government-funded programme which aims to improve the lives of Indigenous Australians.

Page last updated: 09 December 2015

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8 December 2015

More than 30 Indigenous aged care graduates are about to embark on a career in a priority industry, thanks to an Australian Government-funded programme which aims to improve the lives of Indigenous Australians.

The Assistant Minister for Health, the Hon Ken Wyatt AM, MP, today presented the Australian Centre for Workplace Learning graduates with their Certificate III in Aged Care qualifications, funded through the Coalition Government’s Indigenous Advancement Strategy.

“Essentially the Indigenous Advancement Strategy aims to get Indigenous Australians into meaningful employment while improving literacy and numeracy outcomes and increasing Year 12 attainment and pathways to further training and education,” Minister Wyatt said.

Minister Wyatt said the Australian Centre for Workplace Learning, funded by the Indigenous Advancement Strategy, trains the graduates and provides career opportunities in aged care, disability care, and early childhood education and care for Indigenous trainees.

“This organisation gives its students the very best head-start following graduation, by working closely with employers to confirm traineeship positions,” he said.

“Most of these positions are in areas with high Indigenous populations. It means students can remain close to their Country, while becoming more prosperous through a sustainable, long-term career.

“Over the past 10 years, the Australian Centre for Workplace Learning has successfully trained, placed and supported more than 800 Indigenous job seekers into paid employment.”

Minister Wyatt said these Indigenous trainees will enter the aged care system at a time of significant change.

“With the number of Australians aged over 65 expected to grow to 4.6 million in the next 20 years, what better time to embrace older Australians, the services and care they receive,” he said.

“Traditional models of care – where providers largely directed how funding was spent – are now changing as we move towards a consumer driven system which places the needs and goals of ageing Australians at the core of service delivery.”

Minister Wyatt said while the current system provides access to quality care for a growing number of people; it is also challenged in meeting some current needs.

“Aged care is not just about caring for the frail and sick, it is also about enabling consumers to live active and independent lives.

“Added to this, Australia’s growing ageing population will need the aged care workforce to nearly triple from around 350,000 people to more than 800,000 by 2050 to meet the demand.

“I congratulate these graduates on their achievement and wish them the best for their future careers.”

ENDS

Media contact – Chloe Lawler 0447 680 444

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