Grants to help rural practices take on trainees and GP registrars

The Assistant Minister for Health, Senator Fiona Nash, has urged rural and regional general practices to apply for grants to build the facilities needed to take on more trainees and GP registrars.

Page last updated: 05 December 2014

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5 December 2014

The Assistant Minister for Health, Senator Fiona Nash, today urged rural and regional general practices to apply for grants to build the facilities needed to take on more trainees and GP registrars.

“From tomorrow, general practices will be able to access the guidelines for the Rural and Remote Teaching Infrastructure Grants programme and are invited to apply in the round of grants,” Minister Nash announced.

The programme guidelines for the Rural and Remote Teaching Infrastructure Grants programme and an ‘Invitation to Apply’ will be released on Saturday, 6 December 2014 on the Department of Health’s website.

Minister Nash said the Government committed $52.5 million over three years in the Budget to help general practices in regional and rural locations to expand facilities, with the additional consultation rooms and space to support more medical students and supervising GP registrars.

“Grants of up to $300,000 are available to help practices upgrade their facilities, with the general practice to also provide matching funding.”

Minister Nash said a minimum of 175 infrastructure grants will be available for existing rural and regional general practices in Australian Standard Geographical Classification – Remoteness Area 2 to 5.

“The Government supports a strong primary care workforce that can meet Australia’s future healthcare needs,” Minister Nash said.

“This investment in general practice and the primary care workforce will not only strengthen the general practice workforce but also enhance the training of doctors, GP registrars and medical students in regional and rural settings to give patients in country communities better access to health services.

“Moreover, opportunities for medical students and registrars to experience rural and remote practice will help foster interest in careers in these areas, boosting the rural and regional health workforce.

“We know from the evidence that people often choose to stay and work in areas where they have trained.”

Media contact: Kay McNiece, 0412 132 585

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