GP training places in rural and regional areas

Assistant Minister for Health Fiona Nash said the Australian Government was committed to GP training in rural and regional areas.

Page last updated: 22 May 2014

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22 May 2014

Assistant Minister for Health Fiona Nash said the Australian Government was committed to GP training in rural and regional areas.

Minister Nash said rural medical training continued to receive dedicated support and focus with at least fifty per cent of general practice training places required to be located in rural and regional areas.

Of the 300 new GP training places announced in the Budget, General Practice Education and Training (GPET) has advised the Department of Health that sixty-two per cent of the places commencing in 2015 would be allocated to rural and remote locations.

Prevocational General Practice Placements Program (PGPPP) was implemented to encourage hospital doctors to take up careers in general practice. Around 2,300 applications for 1,500 general practice training places in 2015 indicates that interest in careers in general practice has increased significantly.

Minister Nash said, “It is the responsibility of the States and Territories to fund the medical intern year in hospitals.

“The Commonwealth expects the states and territories to provide the required number of interns, so as not to disadvantage rural and regional areas.”

Funds previously allocated to the PGPPP will be redirected to significantly expand GP training places. GP training places will increase by 300 – from 1,200 to 1,500 new places in 2015.

GP stakeholders have been calling for an increase to GP training places. This change will see that happen, to ensure we have a strong GP workforce for Australia.

Minister's media contact: Carolyn Martin, 0417 966 328

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