febfast – Pause for a Cause

Young and not so young Australians have given up sugar or alcohol or have committed to becoming more physically active this month for “febfast”.

Page last updated: 16 February 2018

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16 February 2018

Young and not so young Australians have given up sugar or alcohol or have committed to becoming more physically active this month for “febfast”.

Minister for Sport, Senator Bridget McKenzie, said we are at the half way point but you can still join febfast.

“It’s a great way for Australians to improve their own health, lose weight and raise money to support troubled youth,” Minister McKenzie said.

“Especially after the festive season, most of us could do with a short break from indulgence and a bit more exercise. I support and encourage all Australians, no matter what their ability or age, to get out and get active.

“febfast is flexible and allows you to choose what to skip. My personal choice is committing to moderate exercise every day and stopping my sugar intake, at least for February.”

Australians on average don’t have healthy eating habits or most don’t do enough physical activity either. Due to these and other factors, Australia has the fifth highest rate of obesity for people aged 15 years and over in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

More than half of Australians exceed the World Health Organization’s recommendation for consumption of free sugar. Our average consumption is 60 grams or 14 teaspoons every day.

Regular physical activity is also important for our overall health, across all ages. It reduces the risk of diabetes, stroke, heart disease and some cancers.

Minister McKenzie said adopting good habits for one month was a great start to better health and could lead to longer term improvements.

“febfast is an opportunity to do something really good for yourself, while also doing something good for others,” she said.

febfast is an initiative of Victoria’s Youth Support and Advocacy Service (YSAS). Funds raised go to YSAS and other services for disadvantaged youth:

    • the Link, providing a range of health and wellbeing services to young people in Tasmania;
    • Brisbane Youth Service (BYS);
    • Streetlink Youth Health Service in Adelaide;
    • Swan City Youth Service in Perth, and
    • Ted Noffs Foundation in Sydney and nationally.
For more information on febfast visit their website.

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Media contact: Sally-Anne Kahl: 0427 604 564
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