Zika virus - notifications of Zika virus infection (Zika)

This page contains information about notifications of confirmed Zika in Australia. All cases of Zika virus in Australia have been imported from overseas.

Page last updated: 29 July 2016

National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

Notifications of Zika virus infection (Zika)

Data as at 29 July 2016

Confirmed cases between 2012 and 2016

All notifications of Zika in Australia have been for infections acquired overseas.

There were no notifications of Zika Virus infection in Australia prior to 2012.

Table 1: Notifications of confirmed Zika virus infection in Australia, by state or territory of residence and year of diagnosis, National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

State or territory of residence
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
Total
ACT
0
0
0
0
0
0
NSW
0
0
4
1
10
15
NT
0
1
0
0
1
2
Qld
0
0
7
4
20
31
SA
1
0
0
1
2
4
Tas.
0
0
0
0
0
0
Vic.
0
0
2
1
6
9
WA
0
0
0
2
3
5
Total
1
1
13
9
42
66
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Confirmed and probable cases in 2016

See notes and caveats for more information about the confirmed and probable case definitions.

Table 2: Notifications of confirmed and probable Zika virus infection in Australia in 2016, by country of acquisition, National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

Country of acquisition Confirmed cases Probable cases Total
Barbados
2
0
2
Brazil
3
1
4
Colombia
1
1
2
Dominican Republic
1
1
2
El Salvador
2
0
2
Fiji
6
2
8
Guatemala
2
1
3
Guyana
1
0
1
Haiti
2
0
2
Indonesia
2
0
2
Mexico
2
1
3
Panama
0
1
1
Samoa
4
3
7
South America not elsewhere classified
1
1
2
South-East Asia not elsewhere classified
1
0
1
Tonga
11
8
19
Trinidad and Tobago
0
1
1
Vietnam
1
0
1
Total 42 21 63
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Notes and caveats

What data are included here?

These data include all confirmed cases of Zika virus infection in Australia, and a more detailed analysis of cases in 2016, including probable cases as well as confirmed. The year is based on the diagnosis date, which represents either the onset date or where the date of onset was not known, the earliest of the specimen collection date, the notification date, or the notification receive date.

What is the difference between a confirmed and probable case?

A case definition for Zika is included under flavivirus (unspecified), available from the Department of Health website. A probable Zika case is a case that reflects laboratory suggestive evidence and epidemiological evidence (such as a compatible travel history) but does not currently meet the criteria for laboratory confirmation. Some of these probable cases will be later reclassified as confirmed when more laboratory evidence becomes available (such as a second blood sample), while some will remain probable because no further evidence is available.

Where can I find the case definitions for Zika virus infection and when was the case definition last reviewed?

The case definition for Zika virus infection is available from the Department of Health website. This case definition was revised in April 2016, and retrospectively implemented to 1 January 2016.

Do these data include all Zika virus infections in Australia?

A major limitation of the notification data is that, for most diseases, they represent only a proportion of the total cases occurring in the community, that is, only those cases for which health care was sought, a test conducted and a diagnosis made, followed by a notification to health authorities. The degree of under-representation of all cases is unknown and is most likely variable by disease and jurisdiction. This is particularly relevant for Zika, since the majority of infections are asymptomatic.

Where can I get more information?

For further details on NNDSS and data interpretation, refer to Australia's notifiable diseases status: Annual report of the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System Annual report series published in Communicable Diseases Intelligence, available from: (www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/cda-pubs-annlrpt-nndssar.htm).

Acknowledgements

The Australian Government Department of Health acknowledges the Communicable Diseases Network Australia, the work of public health officers involved in the collection of surveillance data; state and territory public health communicable disease surveillance managers and data managers; and public and private laboratories.