Data on Blood Borne Viruses and Sexually Transmissible Infections

Statistical information is provided by national research centres funded by the department to provide epidemiological data and undertake HIV clinical and social research, HIV and hepatitis virology research, and research focusing on sex, health and society.

Page last updated: 11 December 2015

Epidemiological data for this web page is provided from a number of sources including the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System. Further information is available in the Kirby Institute for infection and immunity in society (formally the National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research), HIV, viral hepatitis and sexually transmissible infections in Australia Annual Surveillance Report 2015; and Bloodborne viral and sexually transmitted infections in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People: Annual Surveillance Report 2015.

The latest overall Australian figures show:

  • A total of 1,081 cases of newly diagnosed HIV infection were notified in Australia in 2014. The number of HIV infections newly diagnosed in Australia has remained stable for the past three years. Chlamydia was the most frequently reported notifiable condition in Australia in 2014 with 86,136 diagnoses; the majority (78%) of diagnoses were among 15 – 29 year olds. The rate of chlamydia diagnosis has increased steadily between 2005 and 2011 (from 202 per 100,000 to 363 per 100,000) but since 2011 has remained stable in both males and females.
  • There were 15,786 cases of gonorrhoea notified in 2014, representing an increased rate in both males (from 62 per 100,000 in 2010 to 99 per 100,000 in 2014), and females (from 30 per 100,000 in 2010 to 38 per 100,000 in 2014).
  • There were a total of 1,999 infectious syphilis notifications nationally in 2014. The rate of diagnosis of infectious syphilis among men increased from 5.1 per 100,000 in 2005 to 15.9 per 100,000 in 2014 whereas the rate among women remained stable between 1.0‑1.9 per 100,000 population.
  • Following the introduction of vaccination against human papillomavirus, the proportion of young women aged 21 years or younger who were diagnosed with genital warts at their first visit to a sexual health centre decreased from 11.4% in 2007 to 1.1% in 2014. Among Australian born heterosexual men in the same age group, the genital warts diagnosis rate was 11.6% in 2007 and declined to 1.1% in 2013; and among heterosexual men aged 21 – 30 years, 18.5% were diagnosed in 2007, declining to 5.6% in 2014.
  • An estimated 213,300 people were living with chronic hepatitis B infection in Australia in 2014.
  • The population rate of diagnosis of hepatitis B infection in Australia has remained steady in the past ten years, with an overall rate of 32 per 100,000 in 2005 and 28 per 100,000 in 2014. There has been a decline in the rate of newly acquired hepatitis B cases (acquired in the past 2 years) in the past ten years by 39% from 1.2 per 100,000 in 2005 to 0.8 per 100,000 in 2014.
  • An estimated 230,470 people were living in Australia with chronic hepatitis C infection.
  • The rate of diagnosis of hepatitis C infection in 2014 was 46 per 100,000, representing a continuing decline over the past 10 years, from 61 per 100,000 in 2005.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people continue to experience higher rates of blood borne virus and sexually transmissible infections. Donovanosis, once a regularly diagnosed sexually transmissible infection among remote Aboriginal populations, is now close to elimination, with only two cases detected since 2011.
  • In 2014, the rate of HIV diagnosis among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people was almost two times higher, diagnosis of hepatitis C virus was almost five times higher, diagnosis of hepatitis B virus was two times higher, gonorrhoea infection was 18 times higher, chlamydia was over three times higher, and infectious syphilis was four times higher than the rate of diagnosis in the non-Indigenous population.

Note 1: Previous HIV, viral hepatitis and sexually transmissible infections in Australia Annual Surveillance reports have included all diagnoses of HIV (first in Australia and first overseas) which means numbers of HIV diagnoses in this report will be lower than reported in previous years.