Radiation Oncology Inquiry

The Radiation Oncology Inquiry was undertaken in 2002. The then Federal Minister for Health and Ageing, Senator Kay Patterson, released the Report of the Radiation Oncology Inquiry: "A vision for radiotherapy" on 13 September 2002.

Page last updated: 17 February 2016

Radiation Oncology Inquiry 2002

The aim of the Radiation Oncology Inquiry was to examine and provide recommendations on Australia's usage of radiation therapy as a cancer treatment modality with reference to current capacity, international best practice, clinical efficacy, as well as other cancer treatment modalities. Special attention was to be paid to research work already commissioned in Australia.
The terms of reference for the Radiation Oncology Inquiry were as follows:
  • Examine and make recommendations on the number and distribution of radiation oncology units needed with reference to appropriate usage levels and patient accessibility, taking into account alternative models of service delivery.
  • Examine the respective roles of radiation oncologists, radiation therapists and radiation physicists in the planning and treatment of cancer patients.
  • Examine the radiation oncologist workforce including training, continuing education and recertification, remuneration and workload.
  • Examine the specific role of radiation therapists including training, continuing education and recertification, career opportunities, remuneration and workload.
  • Examine and make recommendations on funding arrangements for radiation oncology with reference to Commonwealth and State funding of public and private providers and other financial considerations including private health insurance.
  • Examine and make recommendations on patient access to radiation oncology with particular reference to access by rural patients. Examine and make recommendations on national standards for services and facility accreditation.
  • Examine and report on how the Commonwealth, the States and private industry can work together and implement a strategic plan incorporating strategies for data collection, standards and accreditation of units, continuous evaluation of system performance, equipment replacement, State planning and ongoing education and recertification of the radiation oncology workforce.
The Inquiry focused on patient access to radiotherapy, the roles of radiation oncologists, radiation therapists and medical physicists in the delivery of radiation therapy, including equipment and funding arrangements. The report, entitled A vision for radiotherapy, was presented to Senator Patterson on 18 June 2002.

Report of the Radiation Oncology Inquiry: A vision for radiotherapy

This document is no longer available to be downloaded. If you would like a copy please contact the Radiation Oncology Secretariat and a copy will be sent to you.

Radiation Oncology Jurisdictional Implementation Group (ROJIG)

The intergovernmental Radiation Oncology Jurisdictional Implementation Group (ROJIG) was formed in 2003 to develop a response to the Radiation Oncology Inquiry: A vision for radiotherapy report. This document is also no longer available to be downloaded. If you would like a copy please contact the Radiation Oncology Secretariat and a copy will be sent to you.

Please contact the Radiation Oncology Secretariat if you have any queries relating to this inquiry or the response to it.