Publications

Page last updated: 04 August 2014

Pregnancy Warnings on Alcohol Labels


On 13 January 2014, the Department of Health engaged Siggins Miller to undertake an independent evaluation of the voluntary labelling initiative, to measure actions taken by industry in response to the voluntary labelling initiative, and to help inform future decision-making processes by Ministers.

Ministers considered the report at their 27 June 2014 meeting and agreed to extend the existing trial on voluntary uptake of pregnancy health warnings on alcohol product labels, and to undertake a review in two years.

Siggins Miller Report - Pregnancy Labelling Evaluation (Word 481 KB)
Siggins Miller Report - Pregnancy Labelling Evaluation (PDF 1276 KB)

Siggins Miller Report - Pregnancy Labelling Evaluation - Appendices (Word 1245 KB)
Siggins Miller Report - Pregnancy Labelling Evaluation - Appendices (PDF 3089 KB)

The New Zealand Government has also conducted an evaluation of action taken by the alcohol industry in New Zealand in placing pregnancy warning labels on alcohol products. In conducting this evaluation, New Zealand considered the Evaluation Framework developed for the Australian evaluation.

NZ alcohol labelling evaluation report (Word 2585 KB)
NZ alcohol labelling evaluation report (PDF 523 KB)

Review of evidence on the effects and international regulation of caffeinated energy drinks


In June 2011, Zest Health Strategies was commissioned by the Department to undertake a review of the current evidence relating to the trends, consumption patterns and potential harmful effects associated with caffeinated energy drinks. The review also considered current national and international regulatory requirements for these products.

Evidence was gathered from a range of sources including; peer reviewed publications, non-government and government research, current legislative frameworks and relevant data sources (e.g. poisons information hotline data).

The review report summarises evidence in relation to:
  • the effects of caffeine on children, adolescents and adults, including the levels at which consumption becomes harmful, and the potential harms associated with caffeine;
  • the effects of ingredients, such as sugar, taurine, guarana, glucuronolactone and ginseng, that are commonly added to caffeinated energy drinks, including the potential harms and the levels at which they become harmful, and any potential synergistic effects;
  • incidence of harmful effects relating to the consumption of caffeinated energy drinks in children, adolescents and adults;
  • demographic trend data, consumption patterns and social drivers for consumption of caffeinated energy drinks, including effects of marketing; and reports of potential harms associated with caffeinated energy drinks.
    A full copy of the Review of evidence on the effects and international regulation of caffeinated energy drinks, can be found on the Zest Health Strategies Website