Australian national notifiable diseases case definitions - Appendix B: Australian state and territory notifiable diseases

This document contains a list of diseases which are notifiable in Australian states and territories. This list is in addition to those diseases which are notifiable nationally.

Page last updated: 11 March 2016

Appendix B - Non-national notifiable diseases in Australia's States and Territories


Australian Capital Territory | New South Wales | Northern Territory | Queensland | South Australia | Tasmania | Victoria | Western Australia

In addition to the list of nationally notifiable diseases, each state and territory in Australia has its own list of notifiable diseases. The notifiable diseases that are additional to those on the national register are listed below for each state or territory. This information was current in September 2003. Please contact your local state or territory health authority for the current list relevant to your particular state or territory.

Australian Capital Territory

  • Chancroid Equine morbillivirus (Hendra virus) infection
  • Giardiasis
  • Lymphogranuloma venereum
  • Yersiniosis

New South Wales

  • Adverse event following immunisation
  • Chancroid
  • Foodborne illness in 2 or more related cases
  • Gastroenteritis among people of any age, in an institution (e.g. among persons in educational or residential institutions)
  • Lymphogranuloma venereum
  • Typhus (epidemic)

Northern Territory

  • Acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis
  • Acute rheumatic fever
  • Adverse event following immunisation
  • Amoebiasis
  • Atypical mycobacterial disease or non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM)
  • Chancroid
  • Chlamydial conjunctivitis
  • Echinococcosis (hydatid disease)
  • Gastroenteritis (with potential for outbreak): water or foodborne diseases in:
    • two or more related cases
      • in an institution
      • in a foodhandler
  • Human T-cell lymphotropic virus
  • Lymphogranuloma venereum
  • Melioidosis
  • Rotavirus infection
  • Thrombotic thrombocytopaenia purpura
  • Trichomoniasis
  • Typhus (all forms)
  • Vibrio food poisoning
  • Yersiniosis
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Queensland

  • Acute flaccid paralysis
  • Acute rheumatic fever
  • Adverse event following immunisation
  • Atypical mycobacterial disease
  • Bunyavirus infections (not included in arbovirus NEC)
  • Chancroid
  • Ciguatera poisoning
  • Cryptococcus
  • Echinococcosis (hydatid disease)
  • Elevated lead levels
  • Equine morbillivirus (Hendra virus) infection
  • Foodborne or waterborne disease in 2 or more related cases
  • Hendra virus infection
  • Lymphogranuloma venereum
  • Melioidosis
  • Yersiniosis

South Australia

  • Atypical mycobacterial disease
  • Varicella-zoster infection (chickenpox and shingles)
  • Yersiniosis

Tasmania

Available at the Department of Health and Human Services website.

  • Chancroid
  • Echinococcosis (hydatid disease)
  • Elevated lead levels
  • Gastroenteritis in an institution i.e. residential, educational or child care facility
  • Giardiasis
  • Lymphogranuloma venereum
  • Rickettsial infection (including Flinders Island spotted fever and others)
  • Suspected cases of food and waterborne illnesses
  • Vancomycin resistant enterococci
  • Vibrio infection
  • Yersiniosis
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Victoria

  • Food and waterborne illness in two or more related cases
  • Giardiasis

Western Australia

  • Adverse events following immunisation
  • Amoebiasis
  • Amoebic meningitis
  • Chancroid
  • Echinococcosis (hydatid disease)
  • Giardiasis
  • Melioidosis
  • Methicillin-resistant Staphyloccocus aureus infection
  • Paratyphoid fever
  • Relapsing fever
  • Scarlet fever
  • Schistosomiasis (Bilharzia)
  • Typhus (Rickettsial infection)
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus
  • Yersiniosis
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