Sample HTML text descriptors for web accessibility and metadata

This page contains examples of descriptors that authors need to provide when submiitting articles for publication in Communicable Diseases Intelligence. This includes document and table summaries and text descriptors for maps, figures and flow charts.

Page last updated: 14 October 2016

Sample HTML text descriptors for web accessibility and metadata (PDF 300 KB)

The following are examples of summaries and text descriptors required for Australian Government compliance with the WCAG 2.0 web accessibility requirements when publishing CDI articles on the web site.

What is required?

A separate document with:

  • article/report title
  • a short one or two sentence summary of the article/report
  • a short one sentence summary of any tables
  • a long text description of any figures or images including maps or flow charts; the description should be sufficient so that a sight impaired person can interpret the figure/map/chart. In some cases a data table may be published instead, but please let us know if this is your intention. All data tables must be provided as Excel files.

Please DO NOT USE DOT POINTS in your descriptions. The text descriptions are saved as text only files, which do not handle formatting such as dot points.

Please DO NOT repeat the headings as this is repetitive for text readers. The Vision Australia advice for long descriptions is:
To provide a suitable long description, you should:

  • identify the type of graph or chart
  • provide a summary of the data, explaining the trends that a sighted person can see in the image.
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Examples

Not all examples are taken from the same report. Note: Don’t include the table or figures. There are only included here to give a sense of what the descriptions are describing.

Article/report title

2010 Australian Trachoma Surveillance Report

Summary

The National Trachoma Surveillance and Reporting Unit was established in November 2006 to improve the quality and consistency of data collection and reporting of active trachoma in Australia. This report presents data from the 2009 screening program conducted in At Risk communities from those Northern Territory, South Australia and Western Australia regions with endemic trachoma and compares 2009 data with those from screening conducted from 2006 to 2008 inclusive.

Tables

Table 1: Factors associated with admission to intensive care in patients hospitalised with confirmed influenza

Variable Odds ratio (95% CI) P value
Age >65 years 0.49 (0.29, 0.84) 0.01
Medical comorbidities 1.89 (1.02, 3.50) 0.042
Pregnancy 0.20 (0.04, 0.89) 0.034
Indigenous Australian 2.05 (0.68, 6.19) 0.206
Influenza type    
Influenza A 1 (referent)
Influenza B 1.08 (0.66, 1.77) 0.747

Text description

Table 1 shows the the odds ratrio and P value for factors associated with admission to intensive care, including age group, comorbidities, pregnancy, Indigenous status and influenza type.

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Figures

Figure 2: Notification rate for Ross River virus infection, Australia, 2011 to 2012, by age group and sex

sample image as guide to writing a text alternative

Text description

Line chart showing rates of Ross River virus infection by 5-year age groups. Age-group specific rates were highest in middle aged males and females, peaking at 41.8 per 100,000 in females aged 40 to 44 years.

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Figure 8: Notifications of dengue virus infection, Australia, July 2006 to June 2012, by month, year and place of acquisition

sample image as guide to writing a text alternative

Text description

Bar chart showing dengue notifications place of acquisition from Australia, Indonesia, Thailand or other/unknown country. The large outbreak of locally-acquired dengue in North Queensland in 2008-09 is a feature, as well as the increasing trend of cases acquired in Indonesia, particularly from 2010 onwards. In 2011/12, there were 893 notifications of dengue acquired in Indonesia, and these were 62% of all notifications.

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Figure 2: Swab testing results for influenza-like illness, ASPREN, 1 January to 31 March 2013, by week of report

sample image as guide to writing a text alternative

Text description

Dual column and line graph with the primary axis demonstrating the detection of respiratory viruses by week of report from January – March 2013.  The secondary axis (line graph) demonstrates overall influenza positivity by week of report.  Viruses monitored are as follows: influenza A untyped, influenza A H1N1(2009), influenza B, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus type 1, 2 and 3, adenovirus, rhinovirus, metapneumovirus, enterovirus, mycoplasma pneumoniae, and pertussis. These data represent the inter-seasonal period, where fewer samples are submitted for processing.  An influenza positivity peak occurred at week 3 at 47% positivity, representing 8 positive samples. Rhinovirus was the most commonly detected respiratory virus, with 19% of all swabs performed during the reporting period being positive for rhinovirus. Influenza A (untyped) was the second most common respiratory virus, representing 11% of all swabs taken.

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Figure 2: Estimated vaccine effectiveness against hospitalisation for all patients, in specified subgroups and against infection with influenza subtypes

sample image as guide to writing a text alternative

Forest plot chart showing the estimated vaccine effectiveness for all patients (50%), and in subgroups (age group, comorbidity status and influenza type). Estimated vaccine effectiveness was similar in most subgroups but was higher in patients without comorbidities (79%) but 95% confidence intervals all overlap.

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Maps

Map: Number of at-risk communities screened and trachoma prevalence, 2010

sample image as guide to writing a text alternative

Text description

Map of the statistical sub-divisions of Australia showing that prevalence was highest in the Northern Territory sub-division of NT central with a prevalence of 20% or greater. Prevalence was 10% or greater but less than 20% in rest of the Northern Territory, apart from the far northern tip which includes, Darwin, Alligator and East Arnhem and had a prevalence of less than 5%. Prevalence in this range was also found in South Eastern of Western Australia and the north western region of South Australia. Prevalence in the range 5% to less than 10% was found in the Midlands (mid-west), and the Kimberley and Pilbara regions in the north. The south western regions of Western Australia, Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania and the remaining South Australian regions were not tested as these areas are not at risk of trachoma.

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Flow charts

Figure 1: Communicable diseases notifiable fraction

sample image as guide to writing a text alternative

Text description

Flow chart illustrating the fraction of actual cases notified. Instances where a person infected by an organism is not recorded on the NNDSS include; the person shows no signs of illness; is ill but does not seek medical care; seeks medical care but a specimen is not obtained; a specimen is obtained by tests false negative; a positive test is not notified to the health authority; or when a clinician or laboratory notifies the health authority but the health authority does not report the case to NNDSS. Only if the notified health authority reports the case to NNDSS is the case recorded.

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