Anti-Doping effort around the world

Australia's anti-doping efforts take place in a global environment.

Page last updated: 02 August 2016

  1. The international anti-doping effort is built on co-operation between governments and the international sporting movement in supporting the activities of WADA. WADA is the custodian of the World Anti-Doping Code (the Code), which provides for the universal harmonisation of anti-doping rules, procedures and practices across all sports and Governments.
  2. Non-government organisations demonstrate their commitment to the Code by “signing” up to the Code. Governments, on the other hand, commit to the principles of the Code by ratifying the UNESCO International Convention Against Doping in Sport (UNESCO Convention). The Australian Government is a signatory to the UNESCO Convention.

International Intergovernmental Consultative Group on Anti-Doping in Sport

The international anti-doping effort is built on co-operation between governments and the international sporting movement, supporting the activities of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA).

WADA is the custodian of the World Anti-Doping Code (Code), which provides for the universal harmonisation of anti-doping rules, procedures and practices across all sports and Governments.

Non-government organisations such as international sporting federations demonstrate their commitment to harmonised international anti-doping arrangements by ‘signing’ up to the Code. On the other hand, governments cannot be direct parties to the Code because of WADA’s legal status ie it is a non-government organisation. However, in ratifying the UNESCO Convention, Governments commit to the principles of the Code.

Among other things, WADA:

  • implements, supports and monitors compliance with the Code;
  • implements, supports and monitors compliance with the International Standards established under the Code to promote harmonisation in the technical and operational areas of anti-doping;
  • promotes global anti-doping research; and
  • assists stakeholders to implement anti-doping education programmes.

WADA is funded equally by the international sporting movement and governments of the world. The Australian and New Zealand Governments fund the Oceania region contribution to WADA. Australia contributes about $300,000-$400,000 annually.

UNESCO

At the Third International Conference of Ministers and Senior Officials Responsible for Physical Education and Sport in December 1999, Ministers expressed concern over unethical behaviour in sport, in particular doping, and urged all countries to take concerted action.

Accordingly, the UNESCO International Convention against Doping in Sport (UNESCO Convention) was adopted on 19 October 2005 to provide an internationally recognised legal framework to:

  1. ensure that governments take actions against doping in sport that are complementary to those already being taken by the sporting movement, including anti-doping activities at the national level, international cooperation, education and training, and research; and
  2. provide support for the World Anti-Doping Code and for other international standards developed by the World Anti-Doping Agency, recognising the importance of these documents in harmonising policy and practice worldwide.
  3. This is significant because there are specific aspects of anti-doping which only governments can progress.
  4. The UNESCO Convention formally requires states parties (such as Australia) to implement anti-doping rules, develop educational strategies to raise awareness of doping in sport, and support anti-doping research.

The Australian Government contributes annually to the UNESCO Voluntary Fund for the Elimination of Doping, established under Article 17 of the UNESCO Convention to assist less developed countries to create and implement effective anti-doping programmes.

World Anti-Doping Agency

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) was established in 1999 as an international non-government agency responsible for the promotion, coordination and monitoring of the international fight against doping in sport. WADA is the custodian of the World Anti-Doping Code which provides for the universal harmonisation of anti-doping rules, procedures and practices across participating sports and governments.

WADA is funded equally by the international sporting movement and governments of the world. The Australian and New Zealand Governments fund the Oceania region contribution.

Oceania Regional Anti-Doping Organisation

WADA’s Regional Anti-Doping Organisation (RADO) program was implemented in 2004 so that groups of countries could pool resources to develop anti-doping programmes that are compliant with the Code, increase worldwide testing and ensure that more athletes are subject to the same anti-doping protocols.

There are currently 15 RADOs located across the world, including the Oceania RADO (ORADO) based in Fiji. Since 2010, the Australian Government has provided assistance to the ORADO to provide an anti-doping presence in the Pacific region. There are currently nine countries that participate: American Samoa, Cook Islands, Fiji, Palau, Papua New Guinea, New Caledonia, Samoa, Tonga, and Vanuatu.


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