Supporting No Jab No Pay – National Immunisation Program – expansion

This measure provides ongoing catch-up vaccines for all Australian children aged 10 to 19 years of age, and newly arrived refugees and other humanitarian entrants, through the National Immunisation Program (NIP).

Page last updated: 09 May 2017

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Why is this important?

Providing access to a nationally consistent catch-up schedule removes current inequity in access to vaccines and would enable young people aged 10 to19, newly arrived refugees and other humanitarian entrants to access the vaccines recommended by the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC) for all Australian children.

Some groups miss out on critical early childhood vaccines because of parent or carer attitudes towards vaccines or because they arrive in Australia as teenagers or adults.

The time-limited No Jab, No Pay catch-up immunisation program offered free vaccines to 10 to19-year-olds receiving family assistance payments. This measure will make it accessible to all people in the age group on an ongoing basis.

Refugees and other humanitarian entrants are at significant risk of not being immunised or under-immunised on arrival in Australia, with the vast majority lacking immunisations provided through the NIP.

High immunisation rates help protect the community against vaccine-preventable diseases, especially people too young to be immunised or not able to be immunised for medical reasons.

Who will benefit?

Almost 375,000 currently unvaccinated 10 to 19 year olds will be able to access free vaccines with around four per cent (15,000) expected to vaccinate each year.

More than 3,000 refugee and humanitarian entrants will be able to access the 10 to 19-year-old catch-up each year. Further, more than 8,000 adult refugee and humanitarian entrants will be able to catch up on the critical early childhood vaccines each year.

How much will this cost?

This measure will cost $14.1 million from 2017–18 to 2020–21.

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