Helping Families with Diabetes – Insulin Pump Program – reducing patient contributions

This measure simplifies the subsidy and removes the co-payment for the Insulin Pump Program (IPP) to ensure children with type 1 diabetes in families with low incomes have more affordable access to insulin pumps.

Page last updated: 09 May 2017

PDF version: Helping Families with Diabetes – Insulin Pump Program – reducing patient contributions (PDF 122 KB)

Why is this important?

The establishment of a panel of suppliers of insulin pumps, which comes into effect on 1 July 2017, has substantially lowered the unit prices, allowing for around 20 more insulin pumps to be subsidised each year within the existing funding. This will increase the number of children who can benefit from the IPP.

Up to 68 pump subsidies are provided every year, and 775 insulin pumps have been subsidised since the IPP began.

Currently the IPP subsidises all pumps that are listed on the Prostheses List, with the most expensive being $9,500. The minimum subsidy payable by the Government is $500 and the maximum is $6,400.

Under the current program, patient co-payments in the order of several thousand dollars are expected.

Who will benefit?

Removing the co-payment on the IPP will help families who have children with type 1 diabetes to better manage their condition.

An extra 20 insulin pumps are expected to be subsidised, helping more children and families.

Other stakeholders, including the IPP administrator and suppliers of pumps on the panel, will welcome this measure.

How much will this cost?

This measure has nil financial impact.

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