Hepatitis C Education and Prevention Initiative – continuation of funding

The Government has committed $17.0 million over four years to continue the Hepatitis C Education and Prevention Initiative to provide information on testing, diagnosis and treatment to the nearly 200,000 people living with chronic hepatitis C infection.

Page last updated: 08 May 2007

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Why is this important?

  • There is no vaccine or cure for hepatitis C, so education and prevention is of paramount importance in reducing the number of new infections.
  • Approximately 10,000 people were infected with hepatitis C in 2005.
  • Early testing, diagnosis and treatment can also lead to improved health outcomes for people living with hepatitis C.

Who will benefit?

  • Education and prevention activities will target those people most at risk of infection – people who inject drugs, people in custody and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who engage in risky behaviours, such as needle sharing, that may expose them to hepatitis C.
  • This initiative will also provide information on testing, diagnosis and treatment to the nearly 200,000 people living with chronic hepatitis C infection.

What funding is the Government committing to the initiative?

  • The Government has committed continued funding of $17 million over four years.

What have we done in the past?

  • Hepatitis C education and prevention activities have been funded since the initiative was first announced in 1999-2000.
  • Since then, there has been a steady decrease in the number of people diagnosed with hepatitis C.

When will the initiative conclude?

  • This is an ongoing initiative.

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