Cervical Cancer Screening Incentives for General Practitioners – Continue funding

A $97.2 million measure will encourage GPs to screen more women between the ages of 20 and 69 for cervical cancer, particularly women in rural and remote areas, Indigenous women and those from culturally diverse backgrounds.

Page last updated: 09 May 2006

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Why is this important?

  • This initiative aims to improve the rate of early detection of cervical cancer in Australian women, aged 20 to 69 years, the nationally agreed screening age.
  • The incidence of cancer of the cervix in the target group was 9.5 per 100,000 in 2001 and the rate of mortality was 2.2 per 100,000 in 2003. Early detection reduces the incidence of and mortality from cancer of the cervix.
  • This Initiative encourages GPs to systematically screen women in the target group and in particular unscreened and underscreened women such as those in rural and remote areas, Indigenous women and women from linguistically diverse backgrounds.

Who will benefit?

  • It is estimated that there are around 3.5 million women between the ages of 20 and 69 years who need to be screened by their GP for cervical cancer over the next 2 years.

What funding is the Government committing to the initiative?

  • The Government has committed continued funding of $97.2 million over the next four years to encourage GPs to screen women between the age of 20 and 69 years and, in particular, unscreened and underscreened women such as those in rural and remote areas, Indigenous women and women from linguistically diverse backgrounds.

What have we done in the past?

  • Incentives to encourage General Practitioners to systematically screen women were introduced in the 2001-02 Budget to assist in improving the rate of early detection of cervical cancer in Australia.

When will the initiative conclude?

  • This is an ongoing initiative.

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