Home page iconHOME |   Contents page iconCONTENTS |   User guide iconUSER GUIDE |  Search iconSEARCH |
Annual Report - Performance Indicators
Outcome Performance ReportMajor AchievementsOutcome SummaryPerformance IndicatorsFinancial Resources Summary

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS (EFFECTIVENESS INDICATORS)


The Department of Health and Ageing is responsible, and accountable, for contributing to the achievement of nine outcomes. Effectiveness indicators are used to measure the progress the Department is making in achieving our outcomes.

Listed below are the effectiveness indicators for Outcome 3 followed by a brief description of the Department’s performance in meeting these targets.

Indicator 1. Residential places and Community Aged Care Packages per 1,000 persons aged 70 years and over nationally (including places in flexible care)

Target:

a. 108 operational places available per 1,000 persons aged 70 years and over in 2007 (including places
in flexible care).

b. Equitable service availability across planning regions.

Information source/reporting frequency:

Departmental data including payment system and the
Australian Bureau of Statistics. Annual.


a. In the May 2004 Budget, the Australian Government announced an increase from 100 to 108 in the target number of operational places per 1,000 persons aged 70 years and over. The number of operational places available per 1,000 persons aged 70 years and over increased from 100.00 at June 2004 to 102.4 at June 2005. Indicative numbers of places to be released in the next three years have been announced, with a view to achieving the target by 2007. An estimated 23,652 new aged care places will be made available through the 2005 (11,093), 2006 (6,193) and 2007 (6,366) Aged Care Approvals Rounds.

b. Services are planned and funded to achieve regional equity, flexibility, and appropriateness to care needs. Table 3.1 details the number of allocated and operational aged care places per 1,000 persons aged 70 and over by Aged Care Planning Region at June 2005.

Indicator 2. The quality of residential care and accommodation

Target:

a. Accredited services maintain and improve performance against Accreditation Standards.
b. New buildings have a service average of no more than 1.5 residents per room, except where specifically exempted.
c. Reduction in the average number of residents per room.

Information source/reporting frequency:

Information from the Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency Ltd and administrative by-product of certification. Quarterly.


a. As at 30 June 2005, 92 per cent of homes achieved three years of accreditation compared with 90 per cent at 30 June 2004. Performance of aged care homes against Accreditation Standards is assessed by the Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency Ltd.

b. New homes certified during 2004-05, achieved an average of no more than 1.5 residents per room.

c. As at 30 June 2005, the average number of residents per room was 1.41 compared with 1.42 at 30 June 2004.

Indicator 3. The quality of community care services

Target:

Increased number of Home and Community Care services appraising their performance against agreed standards.

Information source/reporting frequency:

Information provided by State and Territory governments. Annual.


All Home and Community Care (HACC) services are required to appraise their performance over a three-year cycle. Therefore any increase in the number of services appraising their performance cannot be measured through a year-on-year comparison. In the first three-year cycle, from July 2001 to June 2004, 2,709 agencies providing HACC were appraised. The next three-year cycle will commence in 2006.

Indicator 4. Responsiveness to the issues arising from Australia’s ageing population

Target:

Progress the elements of the National Strategy for an Ageing Australia relevant to the Health and Ageing portfolio.

Information source/reporting frequency:

Research into, and analysis of, the issues arising from an ageing population, media coverage and community debate on responding to these issues. Annual.



Top of page

In the 2004-05 Budget, funding for the National Strategy for an Ageing Australia was renewed following an independent evaluation in 2003 by the Australasian Centre on Ageing. The review concluded that there was a unanimous view among stakeholders that Australian Government support of the strategy should continue. The Department is continuing to progress the strategy by, among other things:
  • ongoing partnership with local government to increase awareness and help it meet the opportunities and challenges of an ageing population;
  • re-launching the Seniors Portal as the Australian Government’s principal site for people over 50;
  • support for an awards program, including sponsorship of the Senior Australian of the Year Award, the Older People Speak Out Media Awards, Diversity@Work Awards and the Master Builders Association Lifestyle Housing Award;
  • provision of printed and internet information on government services and support for older people; and
  • continued strengthening of the Building Ageing Research initiative, for example through the Framework for an Australian Ageing Research Agenda agreed at the 2002 National Symposium on Ageing Research.

Indicator 5. Level of service provision for frail older people from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds, older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, veterans and war widows, and older people in rural and remote areas

Target:

Provision appropriate to proportion of target group in the population aged 70 years and over, and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 50 years and over.

Information source/reporting frequency:

Departmental payment system. Annual.


The allocation of aged care places for special needs groups, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, in each year takes account of advice from the Aged Care Planning Advisory Committees (ACPACs) on identified community need in each State and Territory. ACPACs provide advice on comparative aged care needs across planning regions, including the needs of people from special needs groups. The Committees consider data, local knowledge and input from the community received in letters and submissions. Following an open competitive process, the Department allocates places to approved providers that demonstrate that they can best meet aged care needs within a particular planning region, community or group. In 2004-05, this process was applied to the 2004 Aged Care Approvals Round.

Indicator 6. Proportion of people recommended for residential care as compared with Community Aged Care Packages and other community care options

Target:

Increased proportion of Community Aged Care Packages and community care recommendations against previous year.

Information source/reporting frequency:

Aged Care Assessment Program National Minimum Data Set. Annual.


In 2003-04, 48.1 per cent of recommendations by Aged Care Assessment Teams (ACATs) were for community care, compared with 47.9 per cent in 2002-03. Final 2004-05 figures were not available in time for this report; however, data for the first three quarters indicates an increase in the proportion of recommendations by ACATs for community care to around 50 per cent.

PART 2: PERFORMANCE INFORMATION


Performance Information for Administered Items


Administered Item 1. Residential care, including:
  • permanent and respite, high and low, residential places for people assessed as needing them, including special needs groups;
  • capital assistance and other support for homes with identified needs;
  • accreditation and monitoring of care and services of aged care homes by the Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency Ltd; and
  • information services and support for the rights of residents, including through the Complaints Resolution Scheme and the Commissioner for Complaints.

Target: Quantity: At least 180,000 residential places allocated by 30 June 2005.

Result: Target met.

183,395 residential places were allocated as at 30 June 2005.

Target: Quantity: More than $36 million in capital grants advertised during 2004-05.
Result: Target met. Capital grants of up to $40.764 million were advertised in the 2004 Aged Care Approvals Round.
Target: Quality: The Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency Ltd monitors the performance of all services against Accreditation Standards and the service improvement plan, including through spot checks and support visits.
Result: Target met.

In 2004-05, the Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency Ltd, in monitoring the performance of all aged care services, undertook 339 accreditation site visits, 83 review audits, and 4,016 support contacts. Of these, 563 were unannounced visits (spot checks).

Target: Quality: Average of 1.25 site visits per home by the Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency Ltd.

Result: Target met. The Agency undertook on average 1.51 site visits per home in 2004-05.

Target: Quality: Less than 5% of complaints referred to the Commissioner for Complaints for review of the process.

Result: Target not met. 5.57% of people who lodged a complaint with the Scheme during 2004-05 also referred to the Commissioner for Complaints for review of the process. This is possibly the result of increased promotion of complaints avenues. All complaints have been addressed.

Target: Efficiency: Increases in the average cost to the Australian Government per resident is no greater than inflation plus growth in client dependency.

Result: Target not met. The increase in cost to the Australian Government per resident in 2004-05 was 6.0%, compared with an increase in the rate of inflation plus growth in client dependency of 3.8%. This is due to increases in payments flowing from the Government’s response to the Review of Pricing Arrangements in Residential Aged Care, for example the Conditional Adjustment Payment (see page 102-3).


Top of page

Administered Item 2. Community care and support for carers, including:
  • Home and Community Care (HACC) services;
  • Community Aged Care Packages (CACPs) and community care establishment grants;
  • Day Therapy Centres and other support services for frail older Australians and people with disabilities, including Safe at Home, Assistance with Care and Housing for the Aged;
  • support services for carers, including Carer Respite Centres and Carer Resource Centres; and
  • information services, including Commonwealth Carelink.

Target: Quantity: An increase in the number of services provided, or people assisted, by HACC services.

Result: Target met.

The HACC Minimum Data Set for 2003-04 reported over 700,000 care recipients. Data for the first three quarters of 2004-05 indicate a growth in the number of clients receiving HACC services of 6% for the full year.

Target: Quality: An increased number of HACC services appraising their performance against agreed standards.
Result: Not applicable. All HACC services are required to appraise their performance over a three-year cycle. Therefore any increase in the number of services appraising their erformance cannot be measured through a year-on-year comparison. In the first three-year cycle, from July 2001 to June 2004, 2,709 agencies providing HACC were appraised. The next three-year cycle will commence in 2006.
Target: Quantity: At least 30,400 CACPs by 30 June 2005.
Result: Target met.

30,537 Community Aged Care Packages were allocated as at 30 June 2005.

Target: Quantity: Number of Day Therapy Centres.

Result: Target met. Indexed funding increases have maintained levels of service provision by Day Therapy Centres. This is a no growth program.

Target: Quantity: Number of National Respite for Carers services funded.

Result: Target met. An estimated 56,000 carers received an estimated 125,627 occasions of service from Commonwealth Carer Respite Centres in 2004-05, compared with an estimated 47,800 in 2003-04.
An estimated 31,000 carers were assisted by Commonwealth Carer Resource Centres, compared with 46,069 in 2003-04.
An estimated 4,000 carers received counselling services in 2004-05 under the National Carer Counselling Program, delivered through Commonwealth Carer Resource Centres, compared with 2,000 in 2003-04.

The total number of items of published information distributed by the Carer Information and Support Program increased from an estimated 343,500 in 2003-04 to an estimated 500,000 in 2004-05.

The total number of carers assisted by respite services increased from an estimated 28,000 in 2003-04 to an estimated 33,000 in 2004-05.

Target: Quantity: Maintain numbers of people assisted by Carelink.

Result: Target met. Client contacts with the Commonwealth Carelink network increased from 199,606 in 2003-04 to 235,344 in 2004-05.

Administered Item 3. Ageing support and strategies, including:
  • implementation of elements of the National Strategy for an Ageing Australia including a whole-ofgovernment approach to ageing matters;
  • flexible care options for rural and remote services; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander services; Extended Aged Care at Home (EACH) Packages; and Innovative Care services;
  • assistance for older people with dementia and their carers through the Dementia Education and Support Program;
  • assistance to eligible clients through the Continence Aids Assistance Scheme;
  • support for awareness promotion, research projects and a helpline under the National Continence Management Strategy;
  • client assessment by Aged Care Assessment Teams (ACAT) and referral to appropriate services; and
  • information for service providers and consumers, including newsletters, brochures, fact sheets, mail faxes and manuals.

Target: Quality: Improved understanding of ageing matters in the community as indicated by periodic attitudinal surveys to monitor the level of community awareness of ageing issues and the value and contribution of older people.

Result: Target met.

In 2003-04, the Department commissioned market research into community attitudes toward population ageing and older people. The research showed an increase in recognition of older people’s contributions from 86% in 2000 to 89% in 2003, and a need for more older people as role models. 36% of research recipients were able to comment unprompted on the impact of ageing issues on Australian society. On prompting, this number rose to 85%. This research was the fourth in a series following an initial study in 1999. The next is planned for 2005-06.

Target: Quality: Implementation of appropriate recommendations of the 2003 Review of the National Strategy for an Ageing Australia.
Result: Target met. The Department implemented recommendations of the 2003 Review of the National Strategy for an Ageing Australia. For more information see Indicator 4: Responsiveness to the issues arising from Australia’s ageing population.
Target: Quantity: At least 400 places in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Services.
Result: Target met.

Around 600 places were funded in 2004-05 for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flexible Services.

Target: Quantity: At least 2,200 flexible aged places for Multipurpose Services.

Result: Target not met. 2,148 flexible aged places were operational at 30 June 2005. The 2,200 target was not met due to delays in the New South Wales State Health capital works program.

Target: Quantity: At least 360 places available for EACH services.

Result: Target met. In the 2004 Aged Care Approvals Round, 900 EACH packages were allocated to successful applicants nationally.

Target: Quantity: At least 1,800 Innovative Care places allocated by June 2005.

Result: Target not met. 1,749 Innovative Care places have been allocated, including 1,428 in the Innovative Pool, and 321 for the Retirement Villages Care Pilot. Additional places were made available for pilots relating to younger people in residential aged care, but most were not taken up by State and Territory governments.

Target: Quantity: At least 600 Transition Care places allocated by June 2005.

Result: Target not met. 599 Transition Care places have been allocated. 600 places were available for allocation with all State and Territory requests for places being met.

Target: Quantity: Maintain the number of people assisted under the Dementia Education and Support Program.

Result: Target met. The number of contacts through the Dementia Education and Support Program increased from 25,344 in 2003-04 to 25,900 in 2004-05. In addition, almost 40,000 contacts were made involving support groups and community education sessions, partially funded through this program and other sources.

Target: Quantity: Maintain the number of people subsidised under the Continence Aids Assistance Scheme.

Result: Target met. In 2004-05, 19,075 people were provided with assistance under the Continence Aids Assistance Scheme, compared with 18,459 in 2003-04.

Target: Effectiveness: Implementation of the National Continence Management Strategy’s awareness promotion, research projects and helpline.

Result: Target met. The National Continence Management Strategy continues to fund a range of research and awareness raising projects. In 2004-05, 4.4 million information products were distributed nationally, an increase of 47% on 2003-04.

Target: Quantity: Maintain or increase the number of ACAT assessments conducted.

Result: See note below. In 2003-04, 190,203 assessments were recorded as being completed, compared with 197,058 for 2002-03. The recorded decrease can in part be attributed to the introduction of improved data validation procedures and a refined definition of completed assessment.

Target: Quality: Maintaining the low level of appeals against ACAT assessment decisions as a proportion of the total number of assessments.

Result: See note below. There were 56 appeals against the outcome of ACAT assessments during 2003-04, representing 0.029% of all assessments. Although this is a small increase from 0.020% in 2002-03, the proportion of appeals remains very small.

Target: Quantity: All service providers, major stakeholders and interested consumers are provided with regular, timely and accurate information regarding administration of Outcome 3.

Result: Target met. Regular editions of the Payment E$$ential$ newsletter were distributed to all residential aged care, CACP and EACH providers. Most editions also included an insert advising on the implementation of the 2004 Budget package arising from the Review of Pricing Arrangements in Residential Aged Care.

Provider transaction reports were issued monthly to providers that had changes to residential appraisals or reviews.

Information products were updated regularly to reflect indexation and policy changes affecting aged care fees and charges. All products are readily accessible on the Department’s internet site and on request from the Aged and Community Care Information Line (1800 500 853).

Provision of resources to support the work of stakeholders in 2004-05 included the development and distribution of the Decision-making Tool: Responding to Issues of Restraint in Aged Care and the Guidelines for a Palliative Approach in Residential Aged Care and the Influ-Info Influenza Kit for Aged Care.

Note: This information is reported for 2003-04, as annual ACAT data are not available to the Department in time for each year’s Annual Report.



Top of page

Performance Information for Departmental Outputs


Output Group 1. Policy advice, including:
  • effective and efficient residential care services;
  • implementation of service standards including certification, accreditation and monitoring of services;
  • effective and efficient community care services;
  • equitable allocation and targeting of services;
  • support for clients and carers;
  • Australian Government-State relations in the aged care field;
  • long-term trends and developments related to population ageing and policy settings affecting older people; and
  • national issues of concern to, and affecting the well-being of, older people.

Target: Quality: A high level of satisfaction of the Ministers and Ministers’ Offices with the relevance, quality and timeliness of policy advice, Question Time Briefs, Parliamentary Questions on Notice and briefings.

Result: Target met. The Minister and Minister’s Office were satisfied with the relevance, quality and timeliness of policy advice, Question Time Briefs, Parliamentary Questions on Notice and briefings.

Target: Quality: Timely production of evidence-based policy research.

Result: Target met.

Examples of the Department’s support of the production of evidencebased policy research included the Building Ageing Research Capacity Project, including:

  • the ongoing development of the Ageing Research Online website;
  • publication in November 2004 of Longitudinal Studies of Ageing: Implications for Future Studies;
  • sponsorship support for the 2004 Australian Association of Gerontology (AAG), and the Emerging Researchers of Ageing national conferences; and
  • financial support for the national research capacity building work of the AAG.

Work continued on advancing the Framework for an Australian Ageing Research Agenda agreed at the 2002 National Symposium on Ageing Research. The Department is represented on the Advisory Committee of the Australian Research Council (ARC) Ageing Well Network. The Department has also worked closely with the National Health and Medical Research Council and the ARC to develop the Ageing Well, Ageing Productively Research Program. This program will support multidisciplinary research projects on ageing.

In 2004-05, the Department administered funding to a research project with the University of Queensland and Blue Care about physical activity and older people. The Department is also administering funding to the first year of the physical activity arm of beyondblue’s Beyond Ageing Research Project for the Prevention of Depression, based in the Australian National University’s Centre for Mental Health Research. This project was funded in 2003-04. No funding was provided in 2004-05.

Target: Quality: Opportunity for national industry and consumer peak organisations to participate in the development and implementation of national policy through consultative groups such as the Aged Care Working Group and the National Advisory Committee on Ageing.

Result: Target met. In 2004-05, the Department supported and consulted a Minister’s Implementation Taskforce and a number of special purpose reference groups formed to advise on the implementation of measures contained in the Government’s response to the Review of Pricing Arrangements in Residential Aged Care. The Taskforce and associated reference groups contain a broad selection of aged care stakeholders including consumer, industry and professional group representatives and service providers.

The Department regularly consulted the Aged Care Advisory Committee which is the peak advisory body representing industry and consumer groups in the provision of advice to the Department and the Minister.

A National Reference Group, with industry and consumer representation, was established in December 2004 to provide advice on the development of the consumer aged care website.


Top of page

Output Group 2. Program management, including:
  • monitoring and processing payments to States and Territories, service providers and clients;
  • financial management and reporting on Outcome 3;
  • review and adjustment of legislation as required;
  • processing applications for financial hardship assistance;
  • implementation of Quality Care Principles;
  • Resident Classification Scale (RCS) regulatory audits;
  • monitoring aged care providers for compliance with standards;
  • certification of aged care homes and monitoring of standards of physical quality;
  • provision of information to service providers including on standards and business operations matters;
  • provision of information to consumers about aged care services and health issues of concern to, and affecting, the well-being of older Australians;
  • resolution of appeals from pre-Aged Care Structural Reform funding arrangements;
  • ongoing consultation with providers and review of the level of regulation;
  • promoting excellence and best practice; and
  • implementing elements of the National Strategy for an Ageing Australia relevant to the Health and Ageing portfolio.

Target: Quality: A high level of stakeholder satisfaction with the timely development and implementation of national strategies as indicated by:

  • periodic attitudinal surveys to monitor the level of community awareness of ageing issues and the value and contribution of older people;
  • implementation of appropriate recommendations of the 2003 Review of the National Strategy for an Ageing Australia; and
  • opportunity for national industry and consumer peak organisations to participate in the development and implementation of national policy through for example, the National Aged Care Accreditation and Compliance Forum and the Aged Care Working Group, Consumer Working Group and the Resident Classification Scale Industry Liaison Group.
Result: Target met.

In 2003-04, the Department commissioned market research into community attitudes toward population ageing and older people. This research was the fourth in a series after an initial study in 1999. The next is planned for 2005-06. For more information see Administered Item 3.7

The Department implemented the recommendations of the 2003 Review of the National Strategy for an Ageing Australia following renewal of funding in the 2004-05 Budget. For more information see Indicator 4: Responsiveness to the issues arising from Australia’s aging population.

Consumers, service providers, professional groups and other stakeholders have an opportunity to participate in the policy process through the Aged Care Advisory Committee, the key forum for consultation and advice on the Australian Government’s aged care programs. The Committee met four times in 2004-05.

National industry and peak consumer organisations are also involved in the Transactions and Technology, and Extra Service Reference Groups and were represented on the Review of Viability Supplement Working Group.

Target: Quality: Budget predictions are met and actual expenses vary less than 5% from budgeted expenses.

Result: Target met. Budget predictions were met and actual expenses varied less than 5% from budgeted expenses.

Target: Quality: 100% of payments are made accurately and on time or payments are made in accordance with negotiated service standards as indicated by:

  • Centrelink services fulfil the conditions set out in their contract relating to resident income status;
  • breaches of acts investigated and appropriate action taken;
  • all approved providers monitored for compliance with legislation;
  • RCS review audits targeted to maximise impact on the level of inaccurate classification appraisals both directly and through deterrent effects;
  • external Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT) appeals responded to within AAT timeframes;
  • appeals against RCS regulatory audits processed within 90 days; and
  • as appropriate imposition of sanctions, information is provided to the consumers of those services.
Result: Target met.

Centrelink fulfilled the conditions set out in their contract relating to resident income status.

Breaches of the Act were investigated and appropriate action taken. Regulatory action was taken against 129 approved providers, including the issue of 12 Notices of Decision to Impose Sanctions and 208 Notices of Non-Compliance.

The Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency Ltd monitored ongoing compliance with the Accreditation Standards through site audits, support contacts and spot checks. This ensures that all approved providers are monitored in a three-year accreditation cycle. The Department also undertakes spot checks and site visits to ensure approved providers comply with relevant legislation.

RCS review audits were targeted to maximise impact on the level of inaccurate classification appraisals.

External AAT appeals were responded to within AAT timeframes. Appeals against RCS regulatory audits were processed within 90 days. The Department wrote to all residents of homes under sanction regarding the imposition of sanctions and details of all sanctions were provided on the Department’s internet site.

Target: Quality: A high level of stakeholder satisfaction with relevance, quality and timeliness of information and education services as indicated by:

  • successful maintenance of formal and informal partnerships with other departments, peak organisations, the private sector and consumer organisations to promote healthy and positive ageing;
  • successful promotion of positive images of older people and aged care in the media and the community in general as indicated by stakeholder feedback;
  • service providers are provided with information on quality standards and business operations;
  • service providers and major stakeholders are provided with regular, timely and accurate information regarding the administration of Outcome 3; and
  • interested consumers can access high quality information products about ageing and aged care issues.
Result: Target met.

Partnerships
The Department maintains relationships with government and non-government agencies to inform the development of its information products, most notably the Australian Government Directory of Services for Older People and the Seniors Portal, which has an editorial board representing key stakeholders.

Promotion of positive ageing
Key activities in 2004-05 included ongoing sponsorship of the Senior Australian of the Year Award, the Master Builders Association Lifestyle Housing Award, and the National Awards for Local Government - Planning for an Ageing Community Award. Two new awards were sponsored: the Diversity@work Awards, encouraging employers to embrace the full breadth of workforce diversity and its potential benefits, and the Older People Speak Out National Media Awards, providing the opportunity to offer an incentive to Australian media to promote positive messages of ageing.

Information for service providers
Information and publications on quality standards and business operations were made available through the Department's Internet site and in response to requests to the Aged Care Information Line.

Information for consumers
The Seniors Portal was re-launched on 31 March 2004. The site is the Australian Government's principal site for people over 50, bringing together information from over 290 government and non-government sources.

142,000 copies of the Australian Government Directory of Services for Older People were distributed to aged care stakeholders and community organisations in 2004-05.

Information for providers and stakeholders
Regular editions of the Payment E$$ential$ newsletter were distributed to all residential aged care, Community Aged Care Package and Extended Aged Care at Home providers. Most editions also included an insert advising on the implementation of the 2004 Budget package arising from the Review of Pricing Arrangements in Residential Aged Care.

Provider transaction reports were issued monthly to providers that had changes to residential appraisals or reviews.

Information products were updated regularly to reflect indexation and policy changes affecting aged care fees and charges. All products are readily accessible on the Department’s internet site and on request from the Aged and Community Care Information Line (1800 500 853).

Target: Quantity: An estimate of 420 hardship applications processed.

Result: Target met. 648 hardship applications were processed in 2004-05.


Produced by the Portfolio Strategies Division, Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing.
URL: http://www.health.gov.au/internet/annrpt/publishing.nsf/Content/performance-indicators-3
If you would like to know more or give us your comments contact: annrep@health.gov.au